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Kontiki
13-06-2012, 08:31
I know there a few other motorbikers on here, this is a e-petition to
ensure biker related questions are made compulsory in the driving theory test.

As any biker knows its dangerous enough on the roads & at least having some motorcyclist awareness questions might help.

Don't know what happened to the link, checked it after posting but here it is again.

http://epetitions.direct.gov.uk/petitions/26272

Bigpeetee
13-06-2012, 09:02
I know there a few other motorbikers on here, this is a e-petition to
ensure biker related questions are made compulsory in the driving theory test.

As any biker knows its dangerous enough on the roads & at least having some motorcyclist awareness questions might help.

Can't see a link??

julie1
13-06-2012, 09:46
I know there a few other motorbikers on here, this is a e-petition to
ensure biker related questions are made compulsory in the driving theory test.

As any biker knows its dangerous enough on the roads & at least having some motorcyclist awareness questions might help.

Hi Ed
I'll sign it if you give us the link. My younger brother is a biker and we use a scooter when we're away with the MH.
Julie

Somelier
13-06-2012, 09:54
I live very close to the eastern end of the notorious "Cat & Fiddle" road between Buxton and Macclesfield, named as one of the most dangerous roads in Britain.

Of course the road is not dangerous at all, what makes it dangerous is those that drive over it at high speed without any regard for speed limits, overtaking restrictions or other road users.

The majority of offenders are motorcyclists, who tear across this road at high speed, overtaking cars whether it is safe to do so or not - on bends, double white lines and against oncoming traffic.

On several occasions, when I have had two Canadian canoes on the top of my car and been driving back from Macclesfield, I have met motorcyclists approaching me on sharp bends and on the wrong side of the road. You should see their reactions when the see 2 huge, green pointed things aiming straight at them!

It is motorcyclists that need to be educated, not car drivers!!!!

Byronic
13-06-2012, 11:23
I know there a few other motorbikers on here, this is a e-petition to
ensure biker related questions are made compulsory in the driving theory test.

As any biker knows its dangerous enough on the roads & at least having some motorcyclist awareness questions might help.

Agreed, can only help. However have you taken a recent Motorcycle Theory Test, even that only has a few motor cycle specific questions. The Hazard Perception section only gives a view from a car drivers perspective, and strangely very experienced riders/drivers are quite likely to fail the H P section. the perceived wisdom being that they click too quickly, it pays to be slower! A flawed test.

Bigpeetee
13-06-2012, 13:04
I live very close to the eastern end of the notorious "Cat & Fiddle" road between Buxton and Macclesfield, named as one of the most dangerous roads in Britain.

Of course the road is not dangerous at all, what makes it dangerous is those that drive over it at high speed without any regard for speed limits, overtaking restrictions or other road users.

The majority of offenders are motorcyclists, who tear across this road at high speed, overtaking cars whether it is safe to do so or not - on bends, double white lines and against oncoming traffic.

On several occasions, when I have had two Canadian canoes on the top of my car and been driving back from Macclesfield, I have met motorcyclists approaching me on sharp bends and on the wrong side of the road. You should see their reactions when the see 2 huge, green pointed things aiming straight at them!

It is motorcyclists that need to be educated, not car drivers!!!!

There's good and bad in both camps, recently I've been driving an invisible motorhome, cars and bikes have all pulled out in front of me, not seeing me by the looks on their faces!!

I think it should start earlier with the cycling proficiency test for ALL children to encourage the sensible use of two wheels, then insist that cyclists stay within the law ie use lights at night, the correct lanes, traffic lights etc.

Then when they go on to powered vehicles be it 2/4/more they will have experienced other road users.

All too often one camp blames another, but in reality there's a lot of both good and bad in all camps.

I'm saying this from th experience of being a keen cyclist, motor cyclist, car, van and motorhome user.

BTW

About 20 years a go one of my apprentices who used to enjoy touring on his BMW bike had just left home on his summer holidays. On a straight road where he was only doing about 50 with his lights on, a Motorhome pulled out in front of him from a side road, he woke up inside the MH with the wife screaming that HE'd spoiled her holiday!!

Luckily for him there was an off duty traffic PC following him to verify his speed and saw what happened.

He had a few bruises and a cut on his lip, his leathers were trashed and the MH & his BMW were right offs.

But I agree, the Cat & Fiddle Rd can be bloody dangerous having traveled over it for almost 60 years, I've seen quite a few accidents, the majority caused by over zealous drivers/riders.

just jane
13-06-2012, 15:28
I live very close to the eastern end of the notorious "Cat & Fiddle" road between Buxton and Macclesfield, named as one of the most dangerous roads in Britain.

Of course the road is not dangerous at all, what makes it dangerous is those that drive over it at high speed without any regard for speed limits, overtaking restrictions or other road users.

The majority of offenders are motorcyclists, who tear across this road at high speed, overtaking cars whether it is safe to do so or not - on bends, double white lines and against oncoming traffic.

On several occasions, when I have had two Canadian canoes on the top of my car and been driving back from Macclesfield, I have met motorcyclists approaching me on sharp bends and on the wrong side of the road. You should see their reactions when the see 2 huge, green pointed things aiming straight at them!

It is motorcyclists that need to be educated, not car drivers!!!!

I find this post extremely bigoted, your opinion is obviously biased by the fact that you live near the most popular roads for bikes and possibly see more than the average amount of them. That road also probably attracts the boy racer types and not the average biker. As Bigpeetee says there are good and bad in all road using groups and an understanding and tolerance should be taught to all of them as part of tests.

sledge
13-06-2012, 17:59
I think its very unfair to blame the bikers while working for several recovery companys i recovered quite a few bike smashes and can only remember 1 between a bike and car where the bike was at fault .I have been to more single and two car crashes than i can remember that were caused by speed or careless driving especially with younger drivers .I ride a bike my self and have heard the phrase sorry i didnt see you several times after taking evasive action to avoid some idiot in a car that has just pulled out in front of me.

mmoane
13-06-2012, 18:26
Hi

I agree with you and have signed this petition. I am a "returning biker" (gave it up 18 years ago after my daughter was born). Although I drive a 125 marauder and have only done the compulsory cbt at present, in the past 4 months I have beeen back on the road with my bike I have noticed how much more dangerous the roads are these days for a biker!!

Mary



I know there a few other motorbikers on here, this is a e-petition to
ensure biker related questions are made compulsory in the driving theory test.

As any biker knows its dangerous enough on the roads & at least having some motorcyclist awareness questions might help.

Kontiki
13-06-2012, 19:02
Sorry about the missing link but I've put on the first post again. Agree with many of the comments, there are good & bad drivers on all sides but it is a fact that on a motorcycle you are much more likely to be seriously hurt if you are in an accident. After returning to biking after many years I really felt vulnerable, I took a 'Bike Safe' 2 day course with the North Wales police which I found excellent. It was enlightening seeing how accidents happen & the causes.

Teffy
13-06-2012, 19:49
I've signed the petition. One of my boys used to ride motorbikes and was twice knocked off his bike, once in this country and once in Germany, by car drivers who turned in front of him without signals or looking. Fortunately he wasn't badly hurt either time but he had friends killed and another lose a leg. Yes there are idiots in all types of vehicle but bikers are so very vulnerable.

just jane
13-06-2012, 20:00
Thanks for the link, I will sign it and pass it on.
As others have said I freely admit there are good and bad drivers of all vehicles(even bicycles-I was almost hit by a group of cyclists going through a red light as I crossed a pedestrian crossing with my children once).
I have known many bikers and many have had accidents but the ones where the biker is at fault usually cause less damage to both rider and bike but I have lost two close friends and had three others suffer very serious(life threatening) injuries because of drivers pulling out of side roads on long straight roads because they didnt see the bike. In one case the driver had not even demisted the side windows and gave the bike less than 30ft stopping distance then tried to blame the bike because the rider had a black helmet on despite the fact that the bike was bright red and had its lights on in broad daylight.

channa
13-06-2012, 23:24
Motorcycles aren't dangerous until you factor in riders and other road users.

I tried to find the link, but Lincolnshire bike safe offer some interesting statistics in terms of accidents..

Along the lines of bar two fatalaties the rest of the counties fatalaties involved sports bike riders...

This group are the group that need e ducating most and yet seem to be the most reluctant....this is why lincs do bikesafe at cadwell park to attract what they consider the most vulnerable group.

I can believe sports riders are the most at risk, many born agains who haven't ridden for years let loose on a two wheel missile

To put things in context, run of the mill 600 cc bikes are faster than a lot of supercars..

I believe that the best thing that can happen to a new rider is to fall off.....not hurt,and no damage to machine hopefully, but it is a sober lesson in motorcycling if you get it wrong it can be a painful experience...respect of the bike perhaps
Likewise every provisional licence holder for a car should be made to ride a bike to induce empathy for other road users, appreciate how road surfaces can affect handling etc.

I am an experienced motorcyclist for what its worth and my comments are borne from experience and observation.

I re iterate motorcycles are not dangerous in themselves until you introduce riders and other road users
Channa

David & Ann
14-06-2012, 02:02
In my 53 years of driving the most important lesson I learnt at a very early age is having judgement and keeping your distance, among all the other precautions you require for being a good and safe driver. In Germany, there is no speed limit, unless otherwise stated. It is drummed into our heads at driving school (Oral and theory classes) that every driver on the road is a danger to you and that you must think and look ahead of every second you are in the driving seat. For me, keeping your distance is a primary lesson.

Somelier
14-06-2012, 07:23
In my 53 years of driving the most important lesson I learnt at a very early age is having judgement and keeping your distance, among all the other precautions you require for being a good and safe driver. In Germany, there is no speed limit, unless otherwise stated. It is drummed into our heads at driving school (Oral and theory classes) that every driver on the road is a danger to you and that you must think and look ahead of every second you are in the driving seat. For me, keeping your distance is a primary lesson.

I agree. But many motorcyclists that I encounter sit immediately on the off-side rear corner of the car in front of them. Should the car need to brake suddenly, there is no way they can avoid a collision. Then the motorcyclist suddenly overtakes the car, without indication and frequently on double white lines, bends or where there is traffic coming the other way. I've lost count of the number of times I've had to brake hard to avoid a motorcyclist overtaking and heading towards me on the wrong side of the road. It is these idiots that create the statistics that label roads as being dangerous.

And don't talk to me about motorcyclists and speed limits!!!!!

Somelier
14-06-2012, 07:27
I find this post extremely bigoted, your opinion is obviously biased by the fact that you live near the most popular roads for bikes and possibly see more than the average amount of them. That road also probably attracts the boy racer types and not the average biker. As Bigpeetee says there are good and bad in all road using groups and an understanding and tolerance should be taught to all of them as part of tests.

How can you say bigoted, when I'm only expressing my experience NOT my opinion!!!!!

David & Ann
14-06-2012, 11:21
My opinion only. A novice when passing his/her test, should still display a plate showing a new qualified driver for 2 years. Any traffic infringement, no matter how small, an immediate ban until you have done X amount hours of retraining and sit through another test. Keep getting hit with a ban and retest until you clear your 2 years under the new driver plate. Perhaps someone can add to this suggestion. Or am I being to hard in my thinking.

Byronic
14-06-2012, 12:20
My opinion only. A novice when passing his/her test, should still display a plate showing a new qualified driver for 2 years. Any traffic infringement, no matter how small, an immediate ban until you have done X amount hours of retraining and sit through another test. Keep getting hit with a ban and retest until you clear your 2 years under the new driver plate. Perhaps someone can add to this suggestion. Or am I being to hard in my thinking.

Perhaps every motorist should do a retest/retraining every 5 years or so there are a lot of old codgers out there who have not even kept up with the Highway Code let alone maintained up to date practical skills. A good start would be mandatory eye sight checks.
Not just the novice and/or the young motorists that may need a bit of remedial attention.

stevebill
14-06-2012, 14:34
This subject is bound to raise some arguments. Ive had a bike since I was 16, and still ride one at 57. I, too, have experienced insane idiots overtaking me on bikes at blind bends- they have no excuse and should be severely dealt with. However, for all our sakes it is surely the sensible thing for all car learner drivers to have to learn about other road users. One major danger is the corner pillar to the car drivers' right and left. These seem to be getting wider and wider to the extent that it is so difficult to see any vehicle coming either from left or right. Education is the key.
That, and address the worrying problem of people texting or reading texts whilst driving along!!!

tf bundy
14-06-2012, 14:51
Hi all.

I have had bikes for the last 32 years, and have never had an accident. I ride at all times of the year and until recently rode 60 miles a day to get to work and back. Therefore may I pass on to anyone interested, my 3 top tips to avoid having an "off".

1. (The most important one of all) Keep a very large distance from the car in front. Not only is it much safer, but makes your riding much more smooth and progressive.
2. Assume that every car is going to pull out in front of you until your are past the point of danger.
3. When riding in the wet, dont just be cautious, be extra cautious! especially with the front end of the bike.

There are many other "top tips", but if you follow these rules, then the chances of having an accident will be significantly reduced.

If you have to remember just one of these simple rules, its rule No.1 that is the life saver, whether it be in a car or on a bike. . . STAY WELL BACK.

Bigpeetee
14-06-2012, 14:58
Hi all.

I have had bikes for the last 32 years, and have never had an accident. I ride at all times of the year and until recently rode 60 miles a day to get to work and back. Therefore may I pass on to anyone interested, my 3 top tips to avoid having an "off".

1. (The most important one of all) Keep a very large distance from the car in front. Not only is it much safer, but makes your riding much more smooth and progressive.
2. Assume that every car is going to pull out in front of you until your are past the point of danger.
3. When riding in the wet, dont just be cautious, be extra cautious! especially with the front end of the bike.

There are many other "top tips", but if you follow these rules, then the chances of having an accident will be significantly reduced.

If you have to remember just one of these simple rules, its rule No.1 that is the life saver, whether it be in a car or on a bike. . . STAY WELL BACK.

Agreed, I too have never had a bike accident, early cycling taught me that EVERYONE, pedestrians, cars, vans, tractors, sheep, buggers with canadian canoes on top:lol-053: especially caravans etc are all trying their best to KILL YOU

Beemer
14-06-2012, 18:24
It is motorcyclists that need to be educated, not car drivers!!!!

Well they certainly get educated when they come off their bikes don't they?
Usually, when they do, they hurt themselves quite badly, and the majority of the time no-one else is hurt.
On the other hand, when a car driver does something stupid and crashes, a lot more people get hurt!
There is a well known abbreviation in the motorcycle community... SMIDSY
Sorry Mate I didn't See You! The most common retort by car drivers!!!!
Bikes are on the increase (especially with the fuel being the price it is) so it is the car drivers that need to be more aware.

Beemer
14-06-2012, 18:38
Hi all.

1. (The most important one of all) Keep a very large distance from the car in front. Not only is it much safer, but makes your riding much more smooth and progressive.
2. Assume that every car is going to pull out in front of you until your are past the point of danger.
3. When riding in the wet, dont just be cautious, be extra cautious! especially with the front end of the bike.



Good advice.
I passed my bike test in Germany (forces) in 1976. There are no 'grey' areas of law out there on the road, if you make a mistake don't expect a driver to avoid you, they know they are in the right and will therefore hit you. As a rider you would be aware of this and your riding attitude would reflect that, of suffer the consequences!

My advice is treat everyone on the road as an idiot and expect them to do the most unexpected, this advice has kept me upright since passing my test. I still commute to work on a motorcycle. I use my wifes Suzuki 600 for filtering through the traffic, but like my BMW bike best for touring.

Kontiki
14-06-2012, 18:39
I feel safer riding in Europe (France/Spain/Portugal these are the only places I have experience of) I find they are more considerate & give you the room. This is more important when we are riding our 125cc 2 up as I can only get it to just over 50.In this country I've lost count of the times I had cars/vans/lorries etc. almost forcing me off the road. Don't have too my problems on my 750 Virago as I can keep away from them.

I am always on my guard for any cars turning out of side roads & assume they haven't seen me unless I have looked into the drivers eyes.


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