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View Full Version : How many different names for the toilet



MORGANTHEMOON
21-06-2012, 12:58
In another thread a toilet was called a chuntie!

I've never heard it called that, so cumon from each area of the UK what do you call the toilet?

Funky Farmer
21-06-2012, 13:03
When I was a kid in rural Somerset we called our outside long drops a 'Gadge' Not sure if it was a local word but I haven't heard it anywhere else. Bloomin' spooky it were on dark winter night too, I can tell ya. Didn't hang about in there for long.

Bigpeetee
21-06-2012, 13:08
Ty Bach surely!!

TOILED

Lavvie

Bog House (Graffiti inside: "The painters work has been in vain, the bog house poet has struck again!)

LOLOAQICI82QB4IP

MORGANTHEMOON
21-06-2012, 13:20
Ty Bach surely!!

TOILED

Lavvie

Bog House (Graffiti inside: "The painters work has been in vain, the bog house poet has struck again!)

LOLOAQICI82QB4IP

Ty Bach yes from the days when the toilet was out the back.

scenictraveller
21-06-2012, 13:25
just for the record :)

Div Ye Mine (http://www.mcjazz.f2s.com/DivYeMine.htm)

Div y' min fin chunties 'neath the bed
Saved journeys in the caul'?
If ye admit t' minin' 'at,
Like me……….yer getting' aul'!


Chunties were more likely a seated flushing toilet bowl but Po's and Pails were ever present as were thrown clay hot water bottles before rubber was rife. In one of my homes was a magnificent victorian heavily crazed toilet bowl - my mother said on sight of it - hey eddie! Kin ye nae get a new chuntie! :lol-053:

also known as a thunder box.

Funky Farmer
21-06-2012, 13:42
just for the record :)

Div Ye Mine (http://www.mcjazz.f2s.com/DivYeMine.htm)

Div y' min fin chunties 'neath the bed
Saved journeys in the caul'?
If ye admit t' minin' 'at,
Like me……….yer getting' aul'!


Chunties were more likely a seated flushing toilet bowl but Po's and Pails were ever present as were thrown clay hot water bottles before rubber was rife. In one of my homes was a magnificent victorian heavily crazed toilet bowl - my mother said on sight of it - hey eddie! Kin ye nae get a new chuntie! :lol-053:

also known as a thunder box.


Yeah, I remember Thunder box. I think that was/is more an army term

maingate
21-06-2012, 13:44
In the North East it is known as 'the nettie'.

tommytransit
21-06-2012, 13:46
it's a "netty" here in the north east, and dont forget to put the sneck on the door or some one may walk in

Firefox
21-06-2012, 13:47
Khazi, bog, lavvie, little boys/girls room, cloakroom, powder room, WC, crapper... all depends on how posh you are. London has a huge cross section of dialects and people. Not that I'm from there but have lived around here for a while.

BambiOwner
21-06-2012, 14:34
Its called a "Dunny" in Australia

Bigpeetee
21-06-2012, 14:38
A Guzunder

More a term for a pottery potty as it guz under the bed

tintent
21-06-2012, 14:49
Must hurry got to go t toolshed.

pink
21-06-2012, 14:54
i say loo, have heard it being called a john

n brown
21-06-2012, 15:10
crapper or bog,used to be an underground crapper in london,all the bowls made by thomas crapper,where the cisterns were thick glass and had goldfish in them.always fun to pull the chain and watch them go down ! the urinals were made by armitage shanks and had a lifelike bluebottle glazed into them to aim at

Bigpeetee
21-06-2012, 15:11
i say loo, have heard it being called a john

The John is an American expression

marydot
21-06-2012, 20:53
In the North East it is known as 'the nettie'.

It's where Wor Geordie lost his leggie, alang the Scotswood Rooad!

Marydot

Teffy
21-06-2012, 21:13
When I was a little girl I used to stay at my Grandma's, where there was an outside lavvie. So in the night we used the "po" which went under the bed. Years later I realised this was the French pronunciation of "pot" - an attempt to make it sound a bit posher and more dignified.

n brown
21-06-2012, 21:38
loo is derived from guardez-l'eau,an early form of golden shower,but obviously,less welcome

Holasuki
21-06-2012, 21:48
A Guzunder

More a term for a pottery potty as it guz under the bed

HA HA HA ! lol!!!

A bit like pointing at food on someone's face / clothes and saying: 'is that for Ron?'

Suki.

kangooroo
21-06-2012, 21:58
'Bathroom' - if you're American...

Firefox
21-06-2012, 22:19
I believe "restroom" is also used in the US. Typically euphemistic of them :D

marydot
22-06-2012, 08:48
My dad used to call it the library, and he would spend ages in our outside lav, reading the paper. Said it was the only place he could get any peace (shouldn't have had so many of us then!) but it was murder if you needed to go, as it was the only one available. Sunday mornings were the worst, as the paper was thicker with all the sports pages!:lol-053:

Marydot

Russtic
22-06-2012, 11:11
Then of course there are the infamous 'starting blocks' en France!

pink
22-06-2012, 13:36
W.C...water closet not wild camping;)

pink
22-06-2012, 13:37
The throne..:king:

pink
22-06-2012, 13:39
The khazi

pink
22-06-2012, 13:43
I like" the oval office"

pink
22-06-2012, 13:52
loo is derived from guardez-l'eau,an early form of golden shower,but obviously,less welcome

lol, i thought it came from Waterloo?

Viktor
22-06-2012, 14:43
The John is an American expression

Actually it's not. Believe it or not 'The John' was the original name given to the flushing toilet after the inventor who was John Harrington in 1596. Joseph Bramah of Yorkshire patented the first practical water closet in England in 1778. However the first 'inventor' of a dry inside toilet was Sir John De Coursey by coincidence and that was where there term 'The John' really originated in Ireland (Carrickfergus Castle) in or around 1180 - 90.
Thomas Crapper was a London plumber who invented the 'ball cock' and thus made the flushing toilet popular in the 1880's.

antiquesam
22-06-2012, 14:52
I remember the "nettie" as a lad, and remember a poem about the midnight engineers who emptied the nettie's from the little door in the back lane and came home "in the morning covered in Turkish delight". Pity I can't remember who wrote it or how the rest of it went.

GeoffB
22-06-2012, 15:05
Excuse the crudity, but don't Aussies call it "sh*t house" as in the line from the Barry Humphries song "she bangs like a sh*t-house door" ? Their more polite term is "dunnie" I believe.

Thunder-box is certainly a forces name, and literal too. They used to have 10-seaters (5 seats back to back, the sides but not the front partitioned off) all above the same deep trench at some training areas. The fun was to wait until someone was sitting down - you could see their legs sticking out - then go around the other side and drop a smoke grenade or thunderflash down another sitting hole. If you got it right the victim didn't know until coloured smoke bellowed out between their legs, or they were shocked by an explosion and got a splattering from below. Happy days!

Viktor
22-06-2012, 15:08
'Stretch & Seal' also caused a few problems lol.

GeoffB
22-06-2012, 16:02
I remember the "nettie" as a lad, and remember a poem about the midnight engineers who emptied the nettie's from the little door in the back lane and came home "in the morning covered in Turkish delight". Pity I can't remember who wrote it or how the rest of it went.

My father's a Midnight Mechanic
He works in the middens by night
And when he comes home in the morning
He's covered with Turkish Delight.

My grandmother (a very proper old lady) used to recite a version when I was tiny, which went:

My father's a midnight mechanic
He works like a fiend in the pit
He goes out each evening and comes home each morning
All covered all over in... then she'd sing "sweet violets, sweeter than the daisies" etc.

She had an outside loo with the pipes heavily lagged and rough 'izal' paper hanging by string on a nail, you didn't hang around there on a frosty winter morning!

antiquesam
22-06-2012, 19:55
My father's a Midnight Mechanic
He works in the middens by night
And when he comes home in the morning
He's covered with Turkish Delight.

My grandmother (a very proper old lady) used to recite a version when I was tiny, which went:

My father's a midnight mechanic
He works like a fiend in the pit
He goes out each evening and comes home each morning
All covered all over in... then she'd sing "sweet violets, sweeter than the daisies" etc.

She had an outside loo with the pipes heavily lagged and rough 'izal' paper hanging by string on a nail, you didn't hang around there on a frosty winter morning!

Thank you for that, it brings back happy memories, I remember Izal but usually we had newspaper squares.

Teffy
22-06-2012, 20:04
We had Izal at home but Grandma had newspaper squares.

Toonman
22-06-2012, 20:20
I was brought up in a mining village in Northumberland and remember the miners cottages in long rows. The toilets were across the back lane and were called "earth closets" by the tenants as the midden men only came once a week and fathers often put a spade of earth down the hole to keep the flys down.

n brown
22-06-2012, 20:20
as my parents became more affluent we moved from newspaper to glossy magazine squares.posh but messy


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