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tiderus
23-06-2012, 11:34
66 years later!


What happened to the radiation that
lasts thousands of years?

HIROSHIMA 1945
http://i698.photobucket.com/albums/vv350/tiderus/HIROSHIMA.jpg

We all know that Hiroshima and Nagasaki were destroyed in August 1945
after the explosion of atomic bombs.
However, we know little about the progress made by the people of that land
during the past 65 years.

http://i698.photobucket.com/albums/vv350/tiderus/bomb.jpg

HIROSHIMA - 65 YEARS LATER

http://i698.photobucket.com/albums/vv350/tiderus/HIRO1.jpg


http://i698.photobucket.com/albums/vv350/tiderus/HIRO2.jpg


http://i698.photobucket.com/albums/vv350/tiderus/HIRO3.jpg

DETROIT- 65 YEARS AFTER HIROSHIMA

http://i698.photobucket.com/albums/vv350/tiderus/DETROIT1.jpg

http://i698.photobucket.com/albums/vv350/tiderus/DET2.jpg

http://i698.photobucket.com/albums/vv350/tiderus/DET3.jpg


What has caused more long term destruction -
the A-bomb,
or
Government welfare programs created to buy the
votes of those who want someone to take care of them?

Japan does not have a welfare system.

Work for it or do without.



These are possibly the 5 best sentences you'll ever read and all applicable to this experiment:

1. You cannot legislate the poor into prosperity by legislating the wealthy out of prosperity.

2. What one person receives without working for, another person must work for without receiving.

3. The government cannot give to anybody anything that the government does not first take from somebody else.

4. You cannot multiply wealth by dividing it!

5. When half of the people get the idea that they do not have to work because the other half is going to take care of them,

and when the other half gets the idea that it does no good to work because somebody else is going to get what they work for,

that's the beginning of the end of any nation.


Where are we going?


Some friends were moaning that they could'nt get a job,

So I easily lined up a couple. 250 a week in a pub, and 550 a week working trafic light signs.

( Which is hard to get people to stick for more than a couple of weeks).

Unfortunatly they didn't fancy that sort of work. So we'll carry on paying them.

Off me soap box now, and back to work.

By jove I needed that!

Rgd's Graham.

Viktor
23-06-2012, 12:20
It's often quite confusing because what mostly happens after the initial blast is first a wave of excessive pressure called overpressure which lessens with distance from ground zero....this crushes....a bit like crushing a beer can....and it is quickly followed by a heat blast again which lessens with distance. It is this pressure which crushes and pushes over structures and trees.

Radiation from radioactive material such as uranium lasts a long time, however most people confuse this and the radiation from radioactive fallout which occurs when dust, soil and debris is sucked up into the air when an atomic bomb detonates close to or in contact with the ground. If the detonation is an airburst there will be no radioactive fallout if high enough, or very little if closer to the ground....so the long term effects of radiation are minimal. The dispersal factor in fallout is also of significance....it's a bit like chucking handfuls of flour up in the air...if there is a little wind the majority will fall a short distance away...if a good bit you might never see any evidence of it on the ground at all and hense very low levels of fallout. The problem comes if there are multiple detonations as in a nuclear war scenario. A reactor coolant leak or meltdown of nuclear material is another matter as it is a high level of radiation in a confined space or area such as in Japan in the aftermath of the sunami.

In the photos below the city was mostly constructed of wooden buildings with paper screens in the traditional Japanese style...what wasn't blown away, burned...in a modern city made mostly of concrete more evidence of buildings standing would be seen.

Contrary to popular belief a nuclear war would be survivable but it would be a difficult survival for most left alive as we would be back for a time in the late 1800's with all our support systems such as food transportation, electric, and manufacturing unavailable for perhaps decades.

maingate
23-06-2012, 12:59
Contrary to popular belief a nuclear war would be survivable but it would be a difficult survival for most left alive as we would be back for a time in the late 1800's with all our support systems such as food transportation, electric, and manufacturing unavailable for perhaps decades.

That would mean the Welsh would just carry on as normal then. :lol-049: :lol-049:

Dezi
23-06-2012, 13:17
It's often quite confusing because what mostly happens after the initial blast is first a wave of excessive pressure called overpressure which lessens with distance from ground zero....this crushes....a bit like crushing a beer can....and it is quickly followed by a heat blast again which lessens with distance. It is this pressure which crushes and pushes over structures and trees.

Radiation from radioactive material such as uranium lasts a long time, however most people confuse this and the radiation from radioactive fallout which occurs when dust, soil and debris is sucked up into the air when an atomic bomb detonates close to or in contact with the ground. If the detonation is an airburst there will be no radioactive fallout if high enough, or very little if closer to the ground....so the long term effects of radiation are minimal. The dispersal factor in fallout is also of significance....it's a bit like chucking handfuls of flour up in the air...if there is a little wind the majority will fall a short distance away...if a good bit you might never see any evidence of it on the ground at all and hense very low levels of fallout. The problem comes if there are multiple detonations as in a nuclear war scenario. A reactor coolant leak or meltdown of nuclear material is another matter as it is a high level of radiation in a confined space or area such as in Japan in the aftermath of the sunami.

In the photos below the city was mostly constructed of wooden buildings with paper screens in the traditional Japanese style...what wasn't blown away, burned...in a modern city made mostly of concrete more evidence of buildings standing would be seen.

Contrary to popular belief a nuclear war would be survivable but it would be a difficult survival for most left alive as we would be back for a time in the late 1800's with all our support systems such as food transportation, electric, and manufacturing unavailable for perhaps decades.


Ahem, Back in the late 1800's this Country had an excellent support system. It led to rapid urbanisation & one of the fastest population growths ever recorded in the World.

Dezi :pc:

Viktor
24-06-2012, 11:07
Better revise that backwards then perhaps to the middle ages ;) but you get the picture I'm sure....the remains of our technology would be lying around broken in the cities with little knowledge or means to fix it for a long time. Farming would be the foremost industry again where the land was usable and there would be gangs trying to take it away from you too....lack of drugs and antibiotics....and even minor injuries could be life threatening....not a pretty picture but also not the 'total aniliation' of the doomsday merchants.

Personally I would worry a lot more about resistance to antibiotics and the re-emmergence of the older diseases which have always been with us.

walkingsoul
24-06-2012, 18:40
!


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