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Bushtrekker
26-06-2012, 16:44
Does anyone else switch language in mid-conversation? In the past I've found that I have a tendency if I forget what I want to say in French or German to switch, not to English, which would be logical, but into the opposite language. Sometimes this works well, as most people know odd words in various languages, as it did at the best schnitzel restaurant in Sopron, Hungary, but I can't help wondering why my brain makes that crossover instead of switching to English.

Funky Farmer
26-06-2012, 17:04
Only when I speak in tongues ;)

Bushtrekker
26-06-2012, 17:07
I discovered last year that I have German and Dutch ancestors, which I had never even suspected.

donkey too
26-06-2012, 17:11
I am glad I am not the only one. My daughter is always laughing at me because I often got from French to German in mid sentence. But not visa versa.
I think it is because when we were brought to England in 1940 we only spoke German. and even after a few years in an English school we still spoke German with my Father in the home. Funny as my Mothers first language was Bretange with a smattering of French yet we never spoke that language together.

Beemer
26-06-2012, 17:23
Does anyone else switch language in mid-conversation? In the past I've found that I have a tendency if I forget what I want to say in French or German to switch, not to English, which would be logical, but into the opposite language. Sometimes this works well, as most people know odd words in various languages, as it did at the best schnitzel restaurant in Sopron, Hungary, but I can't help wondering why my brain makes that crossover instead of switching to English.

My first wife is German and I have a German daughter...and sometimes I can only think of the German word for something and completely forget the English. I always eventually remember the English word, but have always thought how strange is was to have only remembered the German word initially.
I thought I was a bit strange, so I am so glad to find there are others...:lol-061:

Bushtrekker
26-06-2012, 17:24
So all you had to do to expose a spy was stamp on their foot. This wouldn't work with me as I often say Merde or Scheissen in public instead of more obvious Anglo Saxon words. My German started with a woman, who had signed a contract to teach British army children just before I met her, so I did a crash course. French was from school, so well back and I also studied Swahili when I was about 17 as I wanted to go and work in Africa. I can still work out some of what is being said on wildlife programmes, so I don't think languages ever disappear.

vwalan
26-06-2012, 18:12
not that they speak swahili in morocco .gambia algeria etc . africa is a big place . even here they never taught us scoose or geordie at school .and i never ever can get my head round jocksy . have a few scottish mates that have to speak slow and clear if i,m to understand them. sooner speak arabic .

Bushtrekker
26-06-2012, 18:29
I can't understand some people in the Black Country and I grew up there.

runnach
26-06-2012, 18:36
Hope you don't get confused while driving.......what side of road should I be on :scared:

vwalan
26-06-2012, 18:40
always drive on the right side.
the other side would be the wrong side.
doesnt matter where in the world you are .drive on the right side . not the wrong .

Bushtrekker
26-06-2012, 18:42
According to my daughters I always drive in the middle:lol-053:

n brown
26-06-2012, 18:43
i sometimes mutter to myself in french,and spent enough time in portugal to have a problem speaking french without portugese words slipping out.my son's ex was brought up by a spanish dad and english mum in belgium,their family all speak a language made up of the 3 nationalities,and it flows along very nicely

vwalan
26-06-2012, 18:53
when my youngest son was in maroc with us he used to see how many languages he could use in one sentance .he reckoned arabic ,french german english and the odd spanish word got you what you wanted .
it doesnt matter what you use so long as the other person knows the same words in the same language.
comunication is the game .speaking perfect is for school.

Deleted user 21925
26-06-2012, 18:55
I never switch languages mon petit pois!

mumumum4
26-06-2012, 18:58
I speak French well enough to get by talking to a non English speaking French person in France, but I can read French pretty well, to the point where I forget I forget that it's not English I'm reading. Sometimes when in France I forget that my children can't do this so well, and get confused when they haven't understood something I think they should have just read eg information board. If you can understand that!

At home we speak NE Scotland doric which is almost a completely different language to English, and is often not understood by people in Aberdeen where I now live.

Bushtrekker
26-06-2012, 18:59
Body language fascinates me and you can usually tell what's going on by watching expressions.

n brown
26-06-2012, 19:12
when i was a young drunkard my companions were of the glaswegian persuasion.i reckon that experience taught me that ANY language would be easier to learn than that,jimmy.see you

scenictraveller
26-06-2012, 19:37
i only speak doric so no need to worry :)

guy i know had a brother who ran a trawller out of banff,he had 3 polish crew all knew very little english,after 6 month you would have thought they
were born and bread in Banff,

Bushtrekker
26-06-2012, 19:47
Regional differences in language also fascinate me. When I first learned German the teacher spoke with a hard northern accent and it was only when I started going to Austria that I softened the 'Ick' sound to 'Ish'. There is a village which forms part of the Black Country which has a completely different dialect and accent to the rest. Its claim to fame is that they made the anchor chain for the Titanic, so I suspect it was an influx of chainmakers from elsewhere that changed the accent.

n brown
26-06-2012, 19:56
i find i pick up other accents,they're irresistable. put me in the same room as a yorkshireman or a brummie and within 5 mins i'll be using that accent.now that may be annoying,but it makes it easier to tune into what they say.if you speak to a frenchman without using a french accent you'll have problems,but with the accent you can speak english and he'll understand half of what you say.

Beemer
26-06-2012, 21:29
At home we speak NE Scotland doric which is almost a completely different language to English, and is often not understood by people in Aberdeen where I now live.

This is so true... I am a southerner, my wife, a northerner (Sheffield) who translates for me when we are in Scotland...yes really!

Bushtrekker
27-06-2012, 05:11
i find i pick up other accents,they're irresistable. put me in the same room as a yorkshireman or a brummie and within 5 mins i'll be using that accent.now that may be annoying,but it makes it easier to tune into what they say.if you speak to a frenchman without using a french accent you'll have problems,but with the accent you can speak english and he'll understand half of what you say.

I've been in various language classes over the years in which people who had a far better vocabulary than me just murdered the language because they couldn't get the accent right. I was on a services near Winchester last week and a German couple came into McDonalds and I watched her trying to order french fries. She went through every version she could think of, but managed to make herself understood, because she had a very clear speaking voice, so everything she said was understandable, which is more than could be said for those serving.

mumumum4
27-06-2012, 14:51
i only speak doric so no need to worry :)

guy i know had a brother who ran a trawller out of banff,he had 3 polish crew all knew very little english,after 6 month you would have thought they
were born and bread in Banff,


My sister and brother in law live near Banff and he is always away with the tartan army. When in one of the Eastern European countries, after a game, he was walking down the road with his pal and thought they'd have a laugh with a couple of locals. He shouted "Aye aye, foo ye dein?" To his great surprise, the local guy replied "Nae bad, fit like yersel?" Turns out he worked the fishing boats at the Broch (Fraserburgh) It's a small world.

Alison


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