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View Full Version : Careful where you aim that Radar Gun



maureenandtom
27-07-2012, 09:07
Inspired by the close Typhoon thread, which might have been a genuine incident, what about this?



Two British traffic patrol officers from North Berwick were involved in an unusual incident, while checking for speeding motorists on the A-1 Great North Road .

One of the officers (who are not named) used a hand-held radar device to check the speed of a vehicle approaching over the crest of a hill, and was surprised when the speed was recorded at over 300mph. The machine then stopped working and the officers were not able to reset it.

The radar had in fact latched on to a NATO Tornado fighter jet over the North Sea , which was engaged in a low-flying exercise over the Border district.

Back at police headquarters the chief constable fired off a stiff complaint to the RAF Liaison office.

Back came the reply in true laconic RAF style. 'Thank you for your message, which allows us to complete the file on this incident. You may be interested to know that the tactical computer in the Tornado had automatically locked on to your 'hostile radar equipment' and sent a jamming signal back to it. Furthermore, the Sidewinder Air-to-ground missiles aboard the fully-armed aircraft had also locked on to the target. Fortunately the Dutch pilot flying the Tornado responded to the missile status alert intelligently and was able to override the automatic protection system before the missile was launched'.



RAF speeding ticket (http://www.boreme.com/posting.php?id=14020)

Firefox
27-07-2012, 09:24
This is also a completely made up story of the type people like to put in emails urging other people to forward it :)

The police speed trap versus combat aircraft appears in various forms across the world, they just change the name of the plane and air force to suit the country.

mariesnowgoose
27-07-2012, 09:45
We all still like to think that it might have happened, though.

:)

Northerner
27-07-2012, 09:48
This is also a completely made up story of the type people like to put in emails urging other people to forward it :)

The police speed trap versus combat aircraft appears in various forms across the world, they just change the name of the plane and air force to suit the country.

Bang on! And there are loads of them out there. I always check Snopes!

snopes.com: Police Radar Prompts Missile (http://www.snopes.com/horrors/techno/radar.asp)

Firefox
27-07-2012, 10:12
We all still like to think that it might have happened, though.

:)

Of course, this is why it is so successful as a chain email. All they care about is how far they can spread it, so it has to be plausible or have some appeal.

Another one that springs to mind is a fabricated conversation between a US battle ship and a lighthouse whereby the US ship thinks the lighthouse is another ship and threatens to blow it out of the water if it doesn't move out of the way!

Or the ones telling you to forward them if you "love your mother". It's a game between the spammers and the percentage of people who they can persuade to be taken in ;)

n brown
27-07-2012, 10:18
so what are you saying ?that we can't believe what we read ?now that IS far fetched !

Firefox
27-07-2012, 10:27
Enough do believe them though...

If the original story had gone out with a big heading "ACTUALLY THIS STORY IS COMPLETE FABRICATION" I doubt it would have spread past the first email contact, and we wouldn't see it here on this page either:lol-049:

maureenandtom
27-07-2012, 10:28
Some tales are so obviously untrue that you don't need to check. The military, and I think, probably especially the RAF is rife with tall tales. I think they're made up in the bar and by morning they've spread and gained a varnish of respectability.

Some bars used to keep a line book. If you shot a line that was judged to be particularly good it was recorded in the line book. The saying was that if ever it could be proved that your story was untrue you had to buy everybody in the bar that night a pint. I never knew of a line being disproved. We all wanted them to be true.

maureenandtom
27-07-2012, 11:05
Remember the Penguin one?

The line-shoot goes something like this. A helicopter pilot was flying along a beach near Port Stanley (now just Stanley for some reason) and noticed that a row of penguins followed the course of his flight. Intrigued, and putting it down to jealousy on the part of these flightless birds, he turned round and watched the heads turning as flew along their ranks the other way. Like a tennis match was how he put it.

Still intrigued he then flew out to sea and turned round to find every penguin eye on him. Flying towards them, the penguin heads rose and rose and rose until he passed over them - and they all fell over backwards.


Without looking this up, I seem to remember that this line-shoot gained such respectability that it was the subject of a scholarly investigation by some University or other.


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