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Admin
05-08-2012, 21:57
Tes and Keeley are trying to convince me that getting a dog is a good idea :(

I am a dog lover but when I was a teenager I had to take me life long pal (German Shepard) to be put to sleep as she was very ill and in great pain. I still remember her looking at me as they injected her. Later we ended up rescuing a dog, it was a standard yorkshire terrier. The standard is a lot bigger than what most people consider to be a yorkie. Anyway one day my eldest Daughter who was four at the time was playing with the dog and he got stuck behind a chair, she decided to drag him out by his balls and once out he turned and bit her. He bit just below her eye and we had to take her to hospital. She was fine and I did not blame the dog in this circumstance. Unfortunately the hospital reported the matter to the police. :( A few years later he was in the garden playing with the kids and their friends and they decided to put him in a bag. He didn't like this and as we came out to rescue him one of the kids tried to open the bag and got nipped through the bag. Her parents came round and although I tried to explain to them they said the dog was dangerous and reported it to the police. Second offence........ :( :( :(

So I am not going to be easily convinced....

So here is my checklist.

1) happy to travel and camping in van
2) good with children
3) not aggressive
4) happy to be left alone (if I am in the pub at a meet)
5) low shedding
6) intelligent
7) medium exercise requirements, one walk and freedom of garden
8) happy to be around other dogs

I have been looking at Beagles...

What do you think?

Funky Farmer
05-08-2012, 22:07
The obvious answer is a Scottie :)7185 Not that I am at all biased of course.

n brown
05-08-2012, 22:08
having had 4 kids,they grew up,and a dog ,it died, i can't contemplate the idea of willingly giving up so much for a dog,it seems everything becomes secondary to the dog,you can't make a move without considering the dog and it can curtail a lot of activities.but you'll have thought of all this

Admin
05-08-2012, 22:10
The obvious answer is a Scottie :)7185 Not that I am at all biased of course.

too much grooming

rach82
05-08-2012, 22:11
Tes and Keeley are trying to convince me that getting a dog is a good idea :(

I am a dog lover but when I was a teenager I had to take me life long pal (German Shepard) to be put to sleep as she was very ill and in great pain. I still remember her looking at me as they injected her. Later we ended up rescuing a dog, it was a standard yorkshire terrier. The standard is a lot bigger than what most people consider to be a yorkie. Anyway one day my eldest Daughter who was four at the time was playing with the dog and he got stuck behind a chair, she decided to drag him out by his balls and once out he turned and bit her. He bit just below her eye and we had to take her to hospital. She was fine and I did not blame the dog in this circumstance. Unfortunately the hospital reported the matter to the police. :( A few years later he was in the garden playing with the kids and their friends and they decided to put him in a bag. He didn't like this and as we came out to rescue him one of the kids tried to open the bag and got nipped through the bag. Her parents came round and although I tried to explain to them they said the dog was dangerous and reported it to the police. Second offence........ :( :( :(

So I am not going to be easily convinced....

So here is my checklist.

1) happy to travel and camping in van
2) good with children
3) not aggressive
4) happy to be left alone (if I am in the pub at a meet)
5) low shedding
6) intelligent
7) medium exercise requirements, one walk and freedom of garden
8) happy to be around other dogs

I have been looking at Beagles...

What do you think?


Both our dogs are brilliant but our eldest Macy fit's all your requirements!


) happy to travel and camping in van - YES,LOVES IT
2) good with children YES, LOVES THEM
3) not aggressive NOT AT ALL
4) happy to be left alone (if I am in the pub at a meet) YES - QUITE HAPPY TO BE LEFT ALONE FOR LONG PERIODS
5) low shedding WELL MAYBE SHEDS DURING SUMMER MONTHS
6) intelligent - VERY
7) medium exercise requirements, one walk and freedom of garden - YES - QUITE HAPPY AS LONG AS SHE GETS OUT (although she gets 3 walks a day and is never let in the garden to do business - I don't agree with that!)
8) happy to be around other dogs YES - WE TAKE IN OTHER PEOPLES DOGS ALL THE TIME - AS A BUSINESS

She is a Black Labrador

Personally I don't think a beagle is suitable...Labrador, Spanial, Collie?

Sparks
05-08-2012, 22:12
Post deleted

Colincorker
05-08-2012, 22:15
I have to agree that our Black Lab fits all of the above too.

He's coming up for 10 now but still has all the get up and go you could want. But he's equally happy asleep for most of the day!

MORGANTHEMOON
05-08-2012, 22:18
having had 4 kids,they grew up,and a dog ,it died, i can't contemplate the idea of willingly giving up so much for a dog,it seems everything becomes secondary to the dog,you can't make a move without considering the dog and it can curtail a lot of activities.but you'll have thought of all this

nbrown you are right they rule our life and I drop down the pecking order with each new woofer.
But my wife loves her 2 min daxys they are funny and would tick phils boxes, well the puppy will when she gets used to traveling.
They will be both coming to the Wales meet so I'll introduce them.
7187

mariesnowgoose
05-08-2012, 22:19
I may be putting my foot in in here, but don't collies need quite a lot of exercise, being working dogs?

Try this website:

Small Dogs - Small Dog Breeds (under 20lbs) (http://www.bestfamilydog.co.uk/small-dogs.php)

I'm assuming you want a smaller dog so it fits in the camper? :)

n brown
05-08-2012, 22:21
nbrown you are right they rule our life and I drop down the pecking order with each new woofer.
But my wife loves her 2 min daxys they are funny and would tick phils boxes, well the puppy will when she gets used to traveling.
They will be both coming to the Wales meet so I'll introduce them.
7187
if you've trained them to bite english i'm stopping here!

MORGANTHEMOON
05-08-2012, 22:25
if you've trained them to bite english i'm stopping here!

No I would never do that to guests even if they are English but they may s h i t e on your doorstep. lol

n brown
05-08-2012, 22:29
No I would never do that to guests even if they are English but they may s h i t e on your doorstep. lol

oh i don't mind that,do it myself all the time !

Funky Farmer
05-08-2012, 22:33
if you've trained them to bite english i'm stopping here! Result :lol-049::lol-049:

rach82
05-08-2012, 22:35
I may be putting my foot in in here, but don't collies need quite a lot of exercise, being working dogs?

Try this website:

Small Dogs - Small Dog Breeds (under 20lbs) (http://www.bestfamilydog.co.uk/small-dogs.php)

I'm assuming you want a smaller dog so it fits in the camper? :)

All dogs need quite a lot of exercise as do humans!

I dont think getting a small dog means less walks or exercise! if you are not prepered to to exercise a dog dont get one!

We have a Labrador and a Labrador x Ridgeback and they both fit into our camper fine:)

mariesnowgoose
05-08-2012, 22:40
Bichon frise or a shih-tsu, if I had to choose, for your requirements.

How about a good Heinz 57 from a rescue? Suitable breed/cross breed of course.
Too many abandoned dogs needing a good home, and I personally wouldn't buy a "breed" from a dog dealer on this principle alone.
You might be able to get a rescue puppy which would be more suitable for training/getting off to the best start etc. ?

Funky Farmer
05-08-2012, 22:40
This one could meet your requirements Phil :)

Tiny Cute Stuffed Dog. | eBay (http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Tiny-Cute-Stuffed-Dog-/261077233964?pt=UK_Soft_Toys_Bears&hash=item3cc96a712c#ht_500wt_899)

rach82
05-08-2012, 22:42
I have to agree that our Black Lab fits all of the above too.

He's coming up for 10 now but still has all the get up and go you could want. But he's equally happy asleep for most of the day!

Macy is 12 now and still doing 4 mile walks with stiles - she need a little help with the stiles these days but loves being out! Also loves being asleep most of the time!

Burtie
05-08-2012, 22:44
try one of these very easy to look after no shedding no grooming
hardly any walking and it does as its told

7188 7189

lotusanne
05-08-2012, 22:52
Hi Phil, great news that you're thinking of getting a dog, yes they are a responsibility, but you know that, and the benefits far outweigh that in my opinion... the huge welcome everytime you walk in the door, the total unrequited love, the enforced exercise, seeing the countryside every single day all seasons. I wouldnt be without mine. Some breeds definitely want less exrcise than others - greyhounds are surpisingly lazy dogs for example, and many need rescuing. I would choose a rescue dog if atall possible, there are so mnay sad cases desperate for a home. But in the end it comes down to chemistry... I always said i owuld never have another long haired white dog... and what have I got???!!! But I fell in love with her from her photo on the RSPCA site, and the secind i saw her i knew it she was the one! Dogsblog is a great site for rescue dogs, loads of centres and you can search by all sorts of things, breed, size, area etc. Good luck hope you do get one, great for kids to have a dog around too. ps think i meant unconditional love, not unrequited love!

mariesnowgoose
05-08-2012, 22:53
All dogs need quite a lot of exercise as do humans!

I dont think getting a small dog means less walks or exercise! if you are not prepered to to exercise a dog dont get one!

We have a Labrador and a Labrador x Ridgeback and they both fit into our camper fine:)

Here, here on the first one. :D

I just meant that collies probably require a bit more than most (fact), and some smaller dogs need a lot less (fact).

Phil has 2 children plus himself and wife - I'm thinking of the campervan here - so just thought that maybe the size of a potential dog might come into the decision equation as well?
Also, I get the impression that Phil is being gently co-erced into getting a dog by the kids :lol-053:

Admin
05-08-2012, 22:56
Here, here on the first one. :D

I just meant that collies probably require a bit more than most (fact), and some smaller dogs need a lot less (fact).

Phil has 2 children plus himself and wife - I'm thinking of the campervan here - so just thought that maybe the size of a potential dog might come into the decision equation as well?
Also, I get the impression that Phil is being gently co-erced into getting a dog by the kids :lol-053:

* 3 Daughters *

The dogs size is important, if it wasn't then I think choosing would be easy.

mariesnowgoose
05-08-2012, 23:01
* 3 Daughters *

The dogs size is important, if it wasn't then I think choosing would be easy.

Oops!

Sorry about that Phil...

Well, living in a household with that many women you ain't got a chance, me old son. :lol-049:

You'll just have to do your best to steer them in the right direction and hope for the best :goodluck:

cooljules
05-08-2012, 23:40
Take Arthur....hes pig ugly. unfort now his doggy Alzheimers is worse, wanders off, no road sense, wee's and poo's in the house, even if you have just let him out, almost totally blind apart from light/dark but not bad for at least 17 but still loves walks and paddles. will give you lots of love and affection (then forget lol) but as i said, hes damn ugly

kangooroo
06-08-2012, 00:03
How about a big cuddly bunny instead?

These are often adopted by people for whom a dog is impractical.

They can be litter-trained, go for walks on a lead and harness (when it suits you, not them) and are happy to be caged in suitable housing while unsupervised. They're attentive, affectionate and more intelligent than you might think.

Meet Walter, and his Walterlet offspring. Some forum members may recall meeting their late-granny who enjoyed several wilding trips at Stonehenge.....

719071917192

baloothebear
06-08-2012, 00:07
I've had loads of dogs. Rescue dogs some good, some bad and some incredible. I've also used to train Labs as Gun Dogs and did quite well at Field Trials with them. I've also had English Bull Terriers and my daughter used to dress them up in her doll's clothes which they seemed to think was a laugh. My late wife used to breed GSDs.
I've now got an Australian Cattle Dog. I've wanted one for 40 years ever since I first saw them working in the Northern Territories. They are everything that I imagined they'd be and then some. I do use mine for driving Cattle as well
Digger also is on my avatar

Dogs 101- Australian Cattle Dog - YouTube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=koq1G5eDDEE)

and

The Australian Cattle Dog - YouTube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iCyv3MeoYHI)

1) happy to travel and camping in van
Yes - no worries

2) good with children
Your own kids - no worries

3) not aggressive
Now that's a different matter. I think that given the right prompts they would be absolute B&&%%*ds

4) happy to be left alone (if I am in the pub at a meet)
They'd rather be int eh Pub having a few scoops and prawns with you

5) low shedding
Once a year seems to be about right

6) intelligent
Se Wikipedia - reckoned to be one of the top ten dogs for intelligence

7) medium exercise requirements, one walk and freedom of garden
as much or as little as you like

8) happy to be around other dogs
Usually but you have to watch them

I have been looking at Beagles... tend to wander off and roam a lot

Sparks
06-08-2012, 00:48
Post Deleted

Somelier
06-08-2012, 06:18
Sounds like you need a Chihuahua - small, short-haired and small enough to pop into your pocket when you go to the pub!

kimbowbill
06-08-2012, 06:31
Tes and Keeley are trying to convince me that getting a dog is a good idea :(

I am a dog lover but when I was a teenager I had to take me life long pal (German Shepard) to be put to sleep as she was very ill and in great pain. I still remember her looking at me as they injected her. Later we ended up rescuing a dog, it was a standard yorkshire terrier. The standard is a lot bigger than what most people consider to be a yorkie. Anyway one day my eldest Daughter who was four at the time was playing with the dog and he got stuck behind a chair, she decided to drag him out by his balls and once out he turned and bit her. He bit just below her eye and we had to take her to hospital. She was fine and I did not blame the dog in this circumstance. Unfortunately the hospital reported the matter to the police. :( A few years later he was in the garden playing with the kids and their friends and they decided to put him in a bag. He didn't like this and as we came out to rescue him one of the kids tried to open the bag and got nipped through the bag. Her parents came round and although I tried to explain to them they said the dog was dangerous and reported it to the police. Second offence........ :( :( :(

So I am not going to be easily convinced....

So here is my checklist.

1) happy to travel and camping in van
2) good with children
3) not aggressive
4) happy to be left alone (if I am in the pub at a meet)
5) low shedding
6) intelligent
7) medium exercise requirements, one walk and freedom of garden
8) happy to be around other dogs

I have been looking at Beagles...

What do you think?

Phil, most of your criteria is around training a dog, i agree with the king Charles Spaniel, they are adorable, easy to train, low malt but can be a bit timid, great with children and other dogs, easy to house train.

My friend has a miniature labradoodle, she's fantastic, a good all rounder

i would steer clear of a collie, as much as i love em, they need loads of exercise and mental stimulation, seen so many naughty one's (exclude rigg the pigg and mia)

its a big decision to make but if i had to choose again (hopefully not yet) i would go for a rescue mix breed, they make the best dogs ever

i can lend you Henry and keisha for a trail period if you want, they curl up to nearly nothing :scared:

daisymini
06-08-2012, 06:58
Both our dogs are brilliant but our eldest Macy fit's all your requirements!


) happy to travel and camping in van - YES,LOVES IT
2) good with children YES, LOVES THEM
3) not aggressive NOT AT ALL
4) happy to be left alone (if I am in the pub at a meet) YES - QUITE HAPPY TO BE LEFT ALONE FOR LONG PERIODS
5) low shedding WELL MAYBE SHEDS DURING SUMMER MONTHS
6) intelligent - VERY
7) medium exercise requirements, one walk and freedom of garden - YES - QUITE HAPPY AS LONG AS SHE GETS OUT (although she gets 3 walks a day and is never let in the garden to do business - I don't agree with that!)
8) happy to be around other dogs YES - WE TAKE IN OTHER PEOPLES DOGS ALL THE TIME - AS A BUSINESS

She is a Black Labrador

Personally I don't think a beagle is suitable...Labrador, Spanial, Collie?

My Labradoodles fit all your criteria its obviously the Labradour in them..!!

Ems
06-08-2012, 07:04
Don't be fooled that little dogs don't need much exercise, Beau needs lots, she even tells me when she wants to go :lol-053: If she hasn't been out she won't sit still but its great as it makes me less lazy and we have some amazing walks together. She also doesn't like me talking on the phone for long and sits next to me squeaking her ball!

Beau won't stay in the van on her own, I got her when she was a year old and had never been in a car, she travels fine but doesn't like being left. If you want to avoid that sort of problem I suggest getting a puppy so that they get used to it straight away. Beau was also anxious about being left in the house but I managed to get her over that, it did take quite a while though!

They are great companions and I wouldn't be without Beau now, it was a big decision though and it took me a while to decide if I wanted to make the comitment.

Good luck with your choice. My only experience is with Jack Russell crosses and I'm not sure they would suit your requirements! I'd definately recommend rescuing, there are way too many dogs out there that need good homes and some puppies end up in kennels.

donkey too
06-08-2012, 07:46
In my opinion there are only two that fit your requirements.
1 A basset hound, but they need lots of exercise. but they are very family orientated and a Dog will try to exert his authority on the family and become the Patriarc. but this can be handled with a Jenny op. Sorry I meant castration. They then become very loving and are terrific with kids.

2 A standard Poodle. don't need too much exercise, do need clipping every 3 months but this can be done yourself. They also do not mault at all. they are very protective of their family. They are fantastic with children of all ages. The wool / hair can be spun and knitted or used as insulation material.

But as with all breeds. A dog becomes what their owners are.

You could try Brandon on a Saturday night for a stray.:lol-053:

Doodles
06-08-2012, 08:04
7197

bethatthehug
06-08-2012, 08:47
Nope, if you still have those children around I couldn't recommend having any dog at all. Sorry. :(

REC
06-08-2012, 08:57
Bet all that has made things easier, hasn't it Phil??:lol-053: good luck, especially with all the women in your life....I had three sons so know what it is to be outnumbered at every turn!:rolleyes2:

Justjack
06-08-2012, 09:13
We have a collie, which would be totally unsuitable for you Phil as he needs a huge amount of exercise every day. I also look after a neighbours black lab, but size and the amount of moulting she produces would be unsuitable too. However, the mother-in-law has a miniature schnauzer which ticks all your boxes. She would not have been my personal choice but once she arrived we all fell madly in love with her. She would be perfect for you and your girls, as long as they didn't try to bag her!

Smaug
06-08-2012, 10:03
Recently acquired a 6yo Jack Russell bitch formerly used for breeding. She was unwanted after ripping a cockerel to bits. :scared: She gave us a few problems at first & bit me to the bone when I cornered her on the first day! But after a lot of effort we have "socialised" her a lot & she now follows me everywhere. She is however very protective of us & our "space".

I get well pestered when she needs to go out & she loves running around & chasing balls. It's been a while since we last had a dog & we didn't really want the commitment, but she is proving to be relatively little trouble - unlike the kids who are supposed to have left home years ago!! :rolleyes2:

I'd be inclined to go for a rescue dog, you usually get a few weeks "grace" to make sure you settle together well & they do seem to appreciate a good home. And I wouldn't give a toss what breed to get, it's not a fashion contest, the important thing is what the individual animal is like.

Wind Dancer
06-08-2012, 11:10
Hi Phil, There are some useful resources around which could help, some of which are below.

There is also Discover Dogs at Earls Court, which is designed for people just like you. You can go and meet all the different breeds under one roof, and get expert advice on them from people who know the breeds best.

Pedigree dogs are tried and tested so traits are well documented, and if you short list some suitable breeds then you can have an idea what crosses would also be suitable.

Are you ready for a dog? - The Kennel Club (http://www.thekennelclub.org.uk/item/427)

★☞ Dog Breed Selector Quiz SelectSmart.com (http://www.selectsmart.com/DOG/)

Select a breed UK (http://www.petplanet.co.uk/select_a_breed.asp)

Best Family Dog - Learn how to choose the ideal dog. (http://www.bestfamilydog.co.uk/)

It would be beneficial to start looking around at local training clubs too, as good ones are few and far between and often have long waiting lists. Get the children involved in the training, and they could do the Good Citizen awards.

Good luck!

Firefox
06-08-2012, 11:23
What I don't understand is that everyone always tells me "It's not the breed it's how they're brought up".

Yet people also advise "Get a rescue dog."

Surely this is contradictory. With a rescue dog you don't know how they have been brought up. They could have all kinds of issues which can come to light later.

If you are looking for some very specific qualities then surely the best thing would be to get a puppy. Then you could get them used to the motorhome from very young and also get them used to the other aspects of your family life. And make sure they are brought up with loving care.

I'm sure giving a home to a rescue dog is very admirable, and would suit many people, but would it necessarily suit someone who is looking for something very specific in their pet?

Wind Dancer
06-08-2012, 11:38
And I wouldn't give a toss what breed to get, it's not a fashion contest, the important thing is what the individual animal is like.


I agree that the individual animal is important, but so is the breed. The majority of dogs in rescue centres are there because they were inappropriate for the home in the first place. :sad:

jane
06-08-2012, 11:44
why not try a poodle cross.... I have a bearded collie crossed with poodle so have an inteligent, mid sized, loving, non shedding dog, who is happy with one walk( where she tears about and I wander)

Wind Dancer
06-08-2012, 11:51
What I don't understand is that everyone always tells me "It's not the breed it's how they're brought up".

Yet people also advise "Get a rescue dog."

Surely this is contradictory. With a rescue dog you don't know how they have been brought up. They could have all kinds of issues which can come to light later.

If you are looking for some very specific qualities then surely the best thing would be to get a puppy. Then you could get them used to the motorhome from very young and also get them used to the other aspects of your family life. And make sure they are brought up with loving care.

I'm sure giving a home to a rescue dog is very admirable, and would suit many people, but would it necessarily suit someone who is looking for something very specific in their pet?

Very well put Firefox.

Rescue dogs make great pets - but often have hangups or issues that can be high maintenance, or at worst too much for the new owner to handle. One has to be quite flexible and open minded at the risks with rescues.

Sparks
06-08-2012, 12:32
Post deleted

lotty
06-08-2012, 12:48
As you know Phil I have a terrier. He does not shed hair which is brilliant but it is a lot of work to look after the coat as with any breed that doesn't molt. Terriers are very head strong and independent and most have guarding instincts, this can lead to issues with the dog constantly guarding you from other dogs or humans (which has caused me some trouble as you know) on the other hand he is a very loyal and loving dog to his family and is great with kids. However, I would not recommend a Kerry blue terrier or some other terrier breeds to a first time terrier owner. They need a very firm and and to know their place in the pack from day one.
Beagles on the other and I would recommend, Mr Lotty and I have had 3 Beagles and they were fantastic.
The last beagle we had we adopted from the beagle rescue centre local to us, he was 9 years old when we had him and we had 3 wonderful years with him, we had him as a companion for our beagle bitch (we had from a puppy) who was about 9 at the time. We could leave them alone without any separation issues, they all travelled well (in the car we didn't have a van then) very friendly with people and no aggression with other dogs fom any of them.
There are the breeds like labradoodles etc, however these are larger dogs and having Labarador in them are high energy and love water!
If I was to have another dog after Ed then it would be a beagle paws down, no question.
Oh beware, boy do they molt! But if it was the choice of a Beagle that molt but has the ideal temperament or a terrier that doesn't molt but has a difficult temperament then I would get the Beagle and buy a good Hoover! Lol

Smaug
06-08-2012, 12:53
I agree that the individual animal is important, but so is the breed. The majority of dogs in rescue centres are there because they were inappropriate for the home in the first place. :sad:

Have you ever had a rescue dog? Often they are good dogs that have had bad owners & respond extremely well to a good home. Rescue Centres understand the issues & will put down a dog that has serious issues. I disagree with yor statement that the dogs were "inappropriate" have you any evidence to support that statement cos it doesn't match my experience. If a family has picked an "inappropriate" dog & then has the sense to let it go to a rescue centre it is hardly the dog's fault is it?

lotty
06-08-2012, 12:58
Very well put Firefox.

Rescue dogs make great pets - but often have hangups or issues that can be high maintenance, or at worst too much for the new owner to handle. One has to be quite flexible and open minded at the risks with rescues.

I think the key to a rescue dog is know the breeds! Some breeds have traits that are breed specific, ie, guarding (so barking maybe an issue) working dogs (so need mental and physical stimulation) etc
Research the breads. I love Staffies, I have a friend with one but I would never have one myself, they are not good with other dogs and there are a lot of campsites that don't allow them on site, I know this is wild camping however some of us do use the odd CL, so this is another issue to think about
The best dog I've ever had was a 9 year old Beagle from a rescue.

Deleted user 21925
06-08-2012, 13:03
In a lot of respects, dogs are like humans, they all have different personalities, within breeds as well, although it is correct to say that some traits are common to certain breeds.
To some extent, it is the luck of the draw, you may choose a dog because it's breed has certain traits which appeal, however this is no guarantee that the dog will turn out exactly how you want it to. But having made the commitment, it is your responsibility to stick at it!

coolasluck
06-08-2012, 13:46
Tes and Keeley are trying to convince me that getting a dog is a good idea :(

I am a dog lover but when I was a teenager I had to take me life long pal (German Shepard) to be put to sleep as she was very ill and in great pain. I still remember her looking at me as they injected her. Later we ended up rescuing a dog, it was a standard yorkshire terrier. The standard is a lot bigger than what most people consider to be a yorkie. Anyway one day my eldest Daughter who was four at the time was playing with the dog and he got stuck behind a chair, she decided to drag him out by his balls and once out he turned and bit her. He bit just below her eye and we had to take her to hospital. She was fine and I did not blame the dog in this circumstance. Unfortunately the hospital reported the matter to the police. :( A few years later he was in the garden playing with the kids and their friends and they decided to put him in a bag. He didn't like this and as we came out to rescue him one of the kids tried to open the bag and got nipped through the bag. Her parents came round and although I tried to explain to them they said the dog was dangerous and reported it to the police. Second offence........ :( :( :(

So I am not going to be easily convinced....

So here is my checklist.

1) happy to travel and camping in van
2) good with children
3) not aggressive
4) happy to be left alone (if I am in the pub at a meet)
5) low shedding
6) intelligent
7) medium exercise requirements, one walk and freedom of garden
8) happy to be around other dogs

I have been looking at Beagles...

What do you think?





I know where you are coming from with regards to dogs.
We are in the same position as you are,i love animals and my wife is bonkers about dogs,we are also pondering getting a dog for when we fulltime and hit the road.For me it would be cruel to not rescue a dog and give it a happy life if not for the dog then for my wife.
I am particularly partial to collies as they are good for security and i have a thing for them,one thing is sure though my wife can pick up its mess after it:lol-053::lol-053:
I would have thought beagles to be akin to collies in that they need a lot of exercise!!
As long as you are in full charge of your dog and it knows you are boss then you should be ok,i find that animals not unlike women,need to know there place:lol-053:

sasquatch
06-08-2012, 14:00
Before I was married I had Labradors that were trained 'to the gun'. My wife wasn't keen on dogs,so we had children instead! 2 years ago my eldest daughter brought home a Shtzhu pup that one of her work colleagues bought for their daughter who lost interest after 2 weeks! They were going to take it to the pound,my daughter rescued it! My wife is now completely besotted with our Alfie. He loves coming with us and is very socable. If you see the canal boaters dogs the majority have Jack Russells or similat smallish breeds.
But a rescue dog can be some benefit to everyone! especially the dog.

Marie Ellis
06-08-2012, 15:52
Our dog fits all your needs!(No you cant have him!) Hes a black labrador and is a perfect member of our family and the breed is known for no aggression and intelligence! Their perfect for guide dogs and assistance dogs for all the reasons you have highlighted as your needs.Labradors all the way!!

robert b
06-08-2012, 15:58
i own a black lab retreiver and she is a fantastic dog we rescued her 4yrs ago from a breeding owner she is the most placid dog ive ever known she loves it in motorhome we take her every where we go she loves romping in the water .wouldnt be without her

Wind Dancer
06-08-2012, 16:17
Hmm, a few points here....


Have you ever had a rescue dog?
Yes. (Though I don't know why that is relevant).


Often they are good dogs that have had bad owners & respond extremely well to a good home.
Completely agree. The vast majority of problems are due to how the dog has been treated. Good homes are essential for those dogs that have often been through so much, so getting a good match is very important. Far better that they get an appropriate forever home, than being returned again, during a 'grace' period or at any time.


Rescue Centres understand the issues & will put down a dog that has serious issues. Except the Dogs Trust :)
It is horrendous that any dog should find itself in this situation :mad2: :cry:
What reason do you think leads to this tragic situation, and how could it be prevented?


I disagree with yor statement that the dogs were "inappropriate" have you any evidence to support that statement cos it doesn't match my experience.

You are entitled to your opinion and I have no issue with that. Yes I do have evidence, substantial evidence. It is also easy to find on the internet, or talking to people involved with rescue centres.


If a family has picked an "inappropriate" dog & then has the sense to let it go to a rescue centre it is hardly the dog's fault is it?

Of course it is not the dogs fault! I don't know what made you think I thought that.

Re the rescue centre, again I agree. The thing is why are owners giving up their dogs?

Is it not better to treat the cause rather than the symptoms? If they get the right dog in the first place, they're less likely to have to give it up.

It would make more sense for people to research a) whether to have a dog at all, and b) which dog is best suited to the life they can give it?

I'd love to see all rescue dogs adopted, but more so I rather it was not necessary for them to be there in the first place. Worse still is a rehomed dog being returned to the centre :sad:

This thread is about the best dog to meet a particular requirement, and a rescue puppy or dog could fit the bill. However dogs or breeds that are known not to meet the specified requirement would (imo) be inappropriate.

sagart
06-08-2012, 16:35
Low shedding? That eliminates my Rough Collie but superb and natural protectors of children (& my wife!)

lala
06-08-2012, 16:39
boxer great dogs we have 2 bitches no probs at all with camping

herbenny
06-08-2012, 18:34
Phil you can have mine ...a cross between a Lab/ springer he can be as mad as a box of frogs :banana::banana: Only kidding I wouldnt be without him but never in a million years realised how much hard work, time and energy they are. I nagged Himbenny about getting a dog (his family always had dogs) but I never, so I was keen to get a a nice small low maintenance dog but ended up with a big bruiser:D:D. He is a lot of fun though !!

Hope you find something suitable for your family and your lifestyle. I never thought a dog could enrich my life so much :heart:

Shelagh
06-08-2012, 19:14
Does it have to be a pedigree ? Go to RSPCA/SSPCA etc. That way you can try before you buy. Most will even let you take them home overnight to see how compatible you are. There are thousands of homeless dogs out there. We have adopted all our dogs, some have been a bit of hard work to begin with but would not have been without any one of them. Plus you can get some funky looking mutts!

2madcollies
06-08-2012, 19:34
As far as we are concerned the choice is obvious.

We are the most intelligent breed, though we do need to be kept busy with work, training or by taking part in different types of dog-sports. These are mostly held in the countryside, so compliment wild camping.

mariesnowgoose
06-08-2012, 19:38
As far as we are concerned the choice is obvious.

We are the most intelligent breed, though we do need to be kept busy with work, training or by taking part in different types of dog-sports. These are mostly held in the countryside, so compliment wild camping.

I read somewhere that giant poodles are more intelligent than collies < Marie is now running for the hills after such a risky comment....>

But I imagine collies are good if you fancy a spot of lamb roast on the fly out in the wilds :lol-049::lol-053:

n brown
06-08-2012, 19:49
i had a collie bitch she was totally hyper.people said she'd calm down at 2 years old.they lied.still mental at 14 run over trying to round up a reversing land rover.shed enough each day to make warm jumpers for a family of 6 ,couldn't take her anywhere.rounde up us, chickens,falling leaves,passers by,ducks,geese,pigs,cows,not popular with horses.tried to bite chainsaws,jigsaws,bonfires,shotguns.but you might like one

Smaug
06-08-2012, 22:15
i had a collie bitch she was totally hyper.people said she'd calm down at 2 years old.they lied.still mental at 14 run over trying to round up a reversing land rover.shed enough each day to make warm jumpers for a family of 6 ,couldn't take her anywhere.rounde up us, chickens,falling leaves,passers by,ducks,geese,pigs,cows,not popular with horses.tried to bite chainsaws,jigsaws,bonfires,shotguns.but you might like one

:wacko::wacko:

I love it; as I said some posts ago, it's all about the individual animal not the breed. Err, unless you believe all Scotsmen are mean, all Welsh are miserable & all Englishmen are reserved, etc etc. :banana:

hdeagle
06-08-2012, 22:26
I still think that it would be worth considering a rescue dog. Try looking at Hope Rescue or Four Paws Rescue. They have forums that post pictures of the dogs while they are being fostered in peoples homes while they wait for a permanent home.
During this time they are assessed on how they get on with other dogs and cats and how they respond to children.
Our Patterdale cross is a 2 year old rescue dog and he is well behaved and trustworthy, never having damaged anything. He is happy even if left in the van or car so long as he comes with you.
Certainly worth a look imho.
:)

kimbowbill
06-08-2012, 22:35
I wish i could foster, but i wouldn't be able to part with them, could easy do it with kids, but not dogs :banana:

angelad
06-08-2012, 22:57
Try Dog Rescue Pages - UK dog rescue homes, centres and shelters guide (http://www.dogpages.org.uk) a lot of rescues post their dogs on there and it's divided into geographical areas. The majority of the dogs are fostered so you know quite a bit about their characters/training/likes/ etc. I do think that with an older dog you know what you're getting - it's character shows through, you know it's adult size and appearance which you don't always with a young pup. My friend bought a Jack Russell pup that at a year old was the size of a small donkey!

splitty67
06-08-2012, 23:07
Bichon frise or a shih-tsu, if I had to choose, for your requirements.

How about a good Heinz 57 from a rescue? Suitable breed/cross breed of course.
Too many abandoned dogs needing a good home, and I personally wouldn't buy a "breed" from a dog dealer on this principle alone.
You might be able to get a rescue puppy which would be more suitable for training/getting off to the best start etc. ?

I thought a shih-tsu was a safari park with no animals

mariesnowgoose
07-08-2012, 05:14
I believe things should be reversed.

It shouldn't be about the suitability of a dog, it should be about the suitability of the prospective owners.
People should be vetted first before they are allowed to acquire any animal.

They should be the ones having to undergo a "trial run", not the dogs.
I would like to see anyone thinking about taking on a dog undertaking basic training before taking on such a responsibility, especially if they've never had a dog before, or even if they have?
Perhaps we wouldn't have so many abandoned dogs as a result.

Anyone who genuinely loves animals shouldn't object to this approach whatsoever, imho.

It'll never happen though.

kimbowbill
07-08-2012, 05:50
I believe things should be reversed.

It shouldn't be about the suitability of a dog, it should be about the suitability of the prospective owners.
People should be vetted first before they are allowed to acquire any animal.

They should be the ones having to undergo a "trial run", not the dogs.
I would like to see anyone thinking about taking on a dog undertaking basic training before taking on such a responsibility, especially if they've never had a dog before, or even if they have?
Perhaps we wouldn't have so many abandoned dogs as a result.

Anyone who genuinely loves animals shouldn't object to this approach whatsoever, imho.

It'll never happen though.

I so agree with you, and your right, it will never happen, the RSPCA used to do it when i worked there many years ago, i used to do house inspections and suitability, it worked really well.

hdeagle
07-08-2012, 10:36
I believe things should be reversed.

It shouldn't be about the suitability of a dog, it should be about the suitability of the prospective owners.
People should be vetted first before they are allowed to acquire any animal.

They should be the ones having to undergo a "trial run", not the dogs.
I would like to see anyone thinking about taking on a dog undertaking basic training before taking on such a responsibility, especially if they've never had a dog before, or even if they have?
Perhaps we wouldn't have so many abandoned dogs as a result.

Anyone who genuinely loves animals shouldn't object to this approach whatsoever, imho.

It'll never happen though.

The rescue associations that I mentioned in my earlier post do conduct home visits to check out owners and the suitability of gardens. I also know that the Great Dane rescue also check on whether there is enough room and suitable owners for what is very big dog.

pink
07-08-2012, 11:49
721472137212

Autumns from a rescue centre, and shes great!

Admin
07-08-2012, 12:30
At the moment I am looking at a pocket Beagle, not a really small one like a Queen Elizabeth.

lotty
07-08-2012, 14:17

lotty
07-08-2012, 14:28
At the moment I am looking at a pocket Beagle, not a really small one like a Queen Elizabeth.

In the uk all Beagle sizes I believe are classed as a Beagle, it is only America that classes them as different. We had one smaller legged bitch and 2 longer legged males.
Be careful of dodgy breeders. Some are only interested in the money not the welfare of the dogs.
Contact the Beagle welfare who may be able to recommend a breeder or even better could put you in touch with your local rehomeing centre.

maingate
07-08-2012, 14:54
You are all wasting your time. Phil, your kids will make their mind up over the Bank Holiday weekend. They will be besotted with one of 2 breeds they will see that weekend.

mariesnowgoose
07-08-2012, 17:36
Hear, hear!

Couldn't have put it better myself.

I do like dogs, and my other half walks a lot of friends' dogs regularly as he seems to be a bit of a dog whisperer :lol-053:, but we would never have one ourselves.

Everything you've said is absolutely spot on.

Gary Johnson
08-08-2012, 10:52
Our little boy Barney a Shih-Tzu fits your all your needs . Nothing phases him , only dog i`ve known not fussed about thunder and lightning . Travels in the van no prob , loves camping. Takes as much and how little walking I can do . My partner who works in a primary school , took him in and they all loved him , even the odd pupil that was worried by dogs stroked him.

n brown
08-08-2012, 11:02

maingate
08-08-2012, 11:21
Just a little current tale to highlight how children are allegedly irresponsible and depend on the good sense of adults where pets are concerned.

My daughter has a close lifelong friend whose 11 year old son has been saving up his pocket money for 2 years to buy a dog. He helps out at a local Rescue centre on weekends. The parents have now decided what breed he will get and they will name it. By the way, neither of the parents have ever owned a dog before.

The husband does not want a small dog (too poncy), it must be black and white (he is a fanatical Newcastle United supporter). He has already said that he will not be exercising it (he works you see).

The mother has had a fairly serious heart condition from birth (so she will not be exercising it).

They have decided that the son will have a Border Collie. :scared:. A breed that needs plenty of exercise and stimulation. :rolleyes2:

Now who is the sensible one, the child or the parents?

My daughter is having to bite her tongue over this. She does not want to fall out with the mother but can see a disaster looming. The dog will probably be gone before it is housetrained as they have not got a clue how to look after a puppy.:sad:

BambiOwner
08-08-2012, 12:01
We used to have two German Sheppard's and this was fine when I was well enough to take them both on long walks then one died through old age and my health started to get worse so my wife (bless her) used to walk the dog for miles until he to died of old age, now I wanted another dog because I love animals and a dog NEVER lets you down in the same way as some people do. It was a very hard decision on which type of dog to get but in the end my wife found the perfect dog for me, if I am in my wheel chair because I am having a bad day the dog fits down the side it can get on the bed if we want it to and it does not molt the dog cost me nothing I won it in a raffle. Our dog is perfect in every way does not make a mess nor eat us out of house and home does not keep barking at all hours of the day and night.
Have you guessed yet the dog is a miniature Labrador and it is a soft toy, we can take it any where no vets bills cause it never gets sick we do not have to take it out in the rain or snow. We made the decision not to have another live animal because although it would be loved and cared for we would not be able to exercise it and we are not the sort that let their dogs take them self for a walk. Our dog does every thing that is needed and if we ever have trouble while we are wild camping I will throw the dog at them.

mariesnowgoose
08-08-2012, 12:02
Just a little current tale to highlight how children are allegedly irresponsible and depend on the good sense of adults where pets are concerned.

My daughter has a close lifelong friend whose 11 year old son has been saving up his pocket money for 2 years to buy a dog.
He helps out at a local Rescue centre on weekends. The parents have now decided what breed he will get and they will name it. By the way, neither of the parents have ever owned a dog before.

The husband does not want a small dog (too poncy), it must be black and white (he is a fanatical Newcastle United supporter).
He has already said that he will not be exercising it (he works you see).

The mother has had a fairly serious heart condition from birth (so she will not be exercising it).

They have decided that the son will have a Border Collie. :scared:. A breed that needs plenty of exercise and stimulation. :rolleyes2:

Now who is the sensible one, the child or the parents?

My daughter is having to bite her tongue over this. She does not want to fall out with the mother but can see a disaster looming.
The dog will probably be gone before it is housetrained as they have not got a clue how to look after a puppy.:sad:

<Sigh> The father sounds like a typical Geordie male :lol-049:
Maybe the boy can do a swap - the dog of his choice in exchange for the parents? :lol-053:

kernowprickles
08-08-2012, 12:18
Good luck with this one, Phil!! But whatever you get, remember that children will promise to look after the dog, take it for walks, clean up after it, but rarely keep their promise for any length of time! I've seen so many friends end up looking after the dog themselves, while the children who SO wanted it can't be bothered any more. Be prepared to have to do it all yourself when the novelty has worn off!!

KP x x

herbenny
08-08-2012, 13:42
Good luck with this one, Phil!! But whatever you get, remember that children will promise to look after the dog, take it for walks, clean up after it, but rarely keep their promise for any length of time! I've seen so many friends end up looking after the dog themselves, while the children who SO wanted it can't be bothered any more. Be prepared to have to do it all yourself when the novelty has worn off!!

KP x x

Ain't that the truth !!! ........;)

Smaug
08-08-2012, 15:55
We are currently caring for 3 African Giant Land Snails. Our G-daughter thought the were "amazing" & "sick" when she saw them & decided she wanted them. Now she is a year or so older she has decided they are slimy & horrid. :rolleyes2:

They ain't much trouble & can be left for a few days at a time, they eat for a day or two, "run" round the aquarium for a day or two & then sleep for a day our two. A lettuce leaf or a slice of cucumber keep 'em happy for a week. Not ver sociable or cuddly tho & useless as guard snails. :lol-053:

Never bought a pet for a kid yet that the kid looked after itself - including my own tortoise, goldfish etc when I was a kid! If you get any pet it MUST be because you want it yourself, anything else will be a disaster.

kernowprickles
13-08-2012, 20:40
They look quite cute! But I can't quite see Phil taking one for walkies, or getting it to fetch sticks......oh well, I suppose you could always eat it if you got fed up with it!!

7350

mandrake
13-08-2012, 20:49
a pot one

kernowprickles
15-08-2012, 10:23
What about adopting Funky Farmer's marauding Pheasant?? I'm sure he would be glad to see it go to a good home!!

7398

colinbredin
15-08-2012, 10:54
1 We had a Westie - Angus luved kids and Motorhoming. Westies dont Cast Hair. He was left in the van on his own and in the house on his own. No issues. Great wee lad. Died Last Year aged 13
2. We now have a Llaso Apso - Charlie is a great little fella and he does not cast hair either. Luvs the Van and People. Hes now 1 and we can leave him in the house and van on his own.

Colin
Northen Ireland

channa
15-08-2012, 11:18
I personally would steer clear of a beagle, hunting dogs that require a lot of excercise
Leon my pointer fits the bill but suffers the same trait if I don't walk him hell take himself.

Other than that beautiful dogs and tick all the boxes.

For me the gsd is still up there remarkable dogs and don't contrary to belief require that much excercise its more amental thing with them.


I still miss my holly..and I suppose like all pets it is always painful in the end.

madria
15-08-2012, 13:17
Someone else's dog - but if you must Miniature Schnauzer preferably Black - and they don't shed there hair

madria
15-08-2012, 13:24
Like this one

madria
15-08-2012, 13:52
LOL = Ginger and Grey as well, hoping to get down you way in September

4maddogs
15-08-2012, 18:43
Both our dogs are brilliant but our eldest Macy fit's all
She is a Black Labrador

Personally I don't think a beagle is suitable...Labrador, Spanial, Collie?

No! Not a spaniel.....they must ave loads of exercise. I know I have 3 springers.

rockape
15-08-2012, 18:59
if you've trained them to bite english i'm stopping here! Get a cross rottwieller with a St Bernard,,,,,, If it attacks you it will go for help:lol-049:

4maddogs
15-08-2012, 18:59
I wish i could foster, but i wouldn't be able to part with them, could easy do it with kids, but not dogs :banana:

Hmmmm, exactly why I have 4 dogs, not 2!:lol-053:

channa
15-08-2012, 19:17

rockape
15-08-2012, 20:05
[QUOTE=channa;225895] I used to have a talking German Sheperd,, got rid of it as he was a bulls==ter

Sharloid
15-08-2012, 20:24
I don't think making a checklist for having a dog is the right way to go about it, yes it's practical but you will learn nothing. If you find a dog that fits your life, doesn't make you change anything or accomodate him/her then I feel it won't benefit you. I found in the time i've been accompanied by my dog that I have had to adapt to living with him, so I couldn't just carry on like before which has made me better off. Sometimes it's better to get the dog you need rather than the dog you want.

Sparks
15-08-2012, 22:46
Post deleted

Sparks
18-08-2012, 18:10
Post deleted

mariesnowgoose
18-08-2012, 18:30
That is one bouncy dog! Brilliant!

Somelier
18-08-2012, 18:57
Frankly, there is only one breed of dog that is worth considering, even though it's not really what you are after - it's the border collie. No other breed can come anywhere near it!!!!

http://www.rakm.co.uk/web_pics/pepper.jpg

kernowprickles
18-08-2012, 20:45
Ok, Phil, you've had all the advice, now what's it to be???? Giant African Land Snails or those nice purple dogs??? Or have Tess and Keeley forgotten all about it, and you're lying low hoping they won't remember??

:danger::dog::giggle:

KP x x x

Devadave
01-09-2012, 18:26
Yep we got a very special dog...
A black lab retriever cross called Uska... He loves then van and just knows when we are going away, sits inbetween the front seats, he is loyal, he busies when he's told, he won't walk to heel instead he leads.
He loves to play with kids, adults and other dogs...Will not bite anyone or anything.
And he is a guide dog!

the reason I'm telling you this, if you can get a failed or retired guide dog, they can fail if they don't like noises, then you will get a great pet, friend and companion. :wacko::nicethread:

canalwheeler
01-09-2012, 18:33
Which dog is best?

Mine obviously....


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QArMDFKjqYY&feature=plcp

Uncle Tone

mariesnowgoose
01-09-2012, 19:31
Some of us at the Druridge meet know what dog Phil is considering, but we ain't spilling the beans!

You have to guess.

(please keep schtum all Druridge attendees...)

PS The prize for the right answer will NOT be an iPad :lol-049::lol-053:

Admin
02-09-2012, 20:49
ok

picked up the puppy today from Sheffield.

My name is Bosely

7801

I escaped from my box and wanted to be loved.
But it was more fun to climb up on Phil's shoulders and bite his ears
In fact I stayed there for over an hour!

7802780378047805

Too tired to even let go of toy

7806

Deleted user 21925
02-09-2012, 20:53
That's not a Puggle is it Phil??

Admin
02-09-2012, 20:55
That's not a Puggle is it Phil??

No common sense jumped in.

See who guess right first.
His colours and blues eyes should help.

herbenny
02-09-2012, 20:55
oh just too cute for words :heart: bet your little girl is delighted ...congrats Phil .....:wave:

Deleted user 21925
02-09-2012, 21:25
Only dogs I can think of with blue eyes are Weimeraners (which it aint) and Huskies

Deleted user 21925
02-09-2012, 21:41
Australian Shepherd?

Wind Dancer
02-09-2012, 21:59
Looks like a blue merle Border Collie to me. (though could be an Aussie shepherd as Rob suggested).

Either way, you have certainly got your work cut out for you! They say merles are much harder work, and I know plenty that live up to that reputation :lol-053:

Certainly totally adorable :dog:

:goodluck:

Deleted user 21925
02-09-2012, 22:10
Looks like a blue merle Border Collie to me. (though could be an Aussie shepherd as Rob suggested).

Either way, you have certainly got your work cut out for you! They say merles are much harder work, and I know plenty that live up to that reputation :lol-053:

Certainly totally adorable :dog:

:goodluck:

I think you're right about the Merle, just the colour threw me, I thought they had a lot more white.:dog:

Admin
02-09-2012, 22:13
blue merle Border Collie yep.

I wanted a dog that would drive me insane if I do not exercise it! (joke)

Yep it is a dog thats intelligent, hyperactive and loves playing.
It matches my Daughter that is intelligent, hyperactive and loves playing!

duwduwbach893
02-09-2012, 23:54
Hi Phil

we've had many different breeds of dogs over the years..border collies, labradors, jack russels, std yorky (he's current..blind and grumpy, but not surprising considering his history!), std and mini dachunds, etc etc... and all absolutely GREAT in their different ways.

However the best dog to suit all your requirements really is a no brainer..Its got to be a minature schnauzer!

1. small, easy to pick up!!

2. Full of character!

3. Totally non-aggressive.

4. Does'nt moult...at all!

5. Perfect when travelling.

6. Intelligent, and 'mostly' obidient!

7. Fine with kids, and other dogs.

8. No probs being left on her own.

9. Ours does'nt need much 'grooming'. Just the occasional brush through the legs and beard to keep the knots out, and thats it!

Only downsides...expensive to buy, and i would only buy from a breeder who has others as pets, ie not just churned out breeding machines!
Needs a 'hair' cut every 3 month or so, at about 30 a time, so not bad really.. No hairs over your black trousers etc!!

We've had ours, Meg, for 13 years now, and she still behaves like a pup! She's been a very healthy dog throughout, albeit getting a little deaf now.. She will walk as far as you want to (been up snowdon twice, and not the train!), and also happy with a breif walk if thats all thats on offer!

She's fed no more than she needs, and no junk (THATS MOST IMPORTANT...We've seen many small dogs overfed who eventually die way before their time as a consequence of too much food etc).

Anyway, best of luck in whichever you choose,

Best Regards, Gary M

mariesnowgoose
03-09-2012, 04:15
Well done Phil.

Just train him to control all those badly behaved campers in here, god knows they need it :lol-053: - should be easy-peasy with a collie.

You'll soon be a regular Slim Jim if you exercise him properly!

lotusanne
03-09-2012, 07:39
Phil congatulations on your new arrival and he is just the cutest little pup ever, absolutely goregeous. For my money border collies are the best dog of all, as many have already said, but as you are aware so intellingent that they need lots to keep them occupied. But so worth it, in no time you will be saying "he understands every word I say to him...no really..!!". Mia is half blue merl and she is a wonderful dog, couldnt have hoped for better. How has he he coped with his frist night away from his mum? Have you had a puppy before? If not you are in the right place for advice as so many on here have dogs. When I got Mia i got a bit addicted to those Dog Whisper type programs, some amazing results in there, and I did learn stuff from them. But I think the most important rule is.. you are boss - they have to come back/ stop the second you tell them for safety reasons.. but i think you can only get to this position by doing it with love, the dog has to WANT to do what you ask, not do it cos hes scared of you. Please post more piccies and updates and am very happy for you and your family , so exctiting getting a new puppy

oldish hippy
03-09-2012, 08:51
Nice looking pup phil

plum loco
03-09-2012, 17:06
Yes it's heart breaking when you lose your dog.Everyone who has a dog will tell you that there type of dog is the best.There is no perfect dog,they all have there own little quirks German sheperds are over protective of family and property, and make the best guard dogs,long haired terriers are very clever,they make great work dogs and like to be hunting in the scrubs.What ever type of dog you choose,you will soon come to love it and it will love you back,and be the best dog ever,to you only that is.

ourchoir
03-09-2012, 18:02
Beagles are fantastic - we had one - they are as safe as any can be with children but - they wander - a lot - ever heard of the phrase hare brained? You will not be able to let them off lead in the open as their nose will lead them into all sorts of trouble. Black lab sounds good if you have the space....Good luck! J

mariesnowgoose
03-09-2012, 18:35
This is a fully grown blue merle collie and is the type of dog that Phil now has, except his is only a wee pup.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/be/Blue_merle_Border_Collie.jpg

oldish hippy
03-09-2012, 18:49
that will keep him active phill wil have to teach him in welsh that confuse other owners when he is out and about first thing is to teach him whicj side of the bed is yours in the camper so he always sleeps on other side lol

Admin
03-09-2012, 22:28
He is doing well, no problems last night.

He likes fuss then lets you know when hes had enough.

Tes taught him to sit on command today, I thought it was a fluke at first, but he is happy to repeat this.

He was watching us clean up his accidents with tissue yesterday. He missed his training pad tonight and wee'd on the floor slightly, he went and got a tissue and dropped it on the wee!

Good doggy!

lotusanne
03-09-2012, 22:31
He is doing well, no problems last night.

He likes fuss then lets you know when hes had enough.

Tes taught him to sit on command today, I thought it was a fluke at first, but he is happy to repeat this.

He was watching us clean up his accidents with tissue yesterday. He missed his training pad tonight and wee'd on the floor slightly, he went and got a tissue and dropped it on the wee!

Good doggy!

No way!! Really Phil? Thats so clever, sounds like you've got a bright one there:(:):dance:

Deleted user 21925
03-09-2012, 22:33
Tes taught him to sit on command today, I thought it was a fluke at first, but he is happy to repeat this.

He was watching us clean up his accidents with tissue yesterday. He missed his training pad tonight and wee'd on the floor slightly, he went and got a tissue and dropped it on the wee!

Good doggy!

What! Should be making your breakfast and fetching the papers by now!

Oh damn, I forgot. You've met Ruby!

mariesnowgoose
04-09-2012, 03:41
He missed his training pad tonight and wee'd on the floor slightly, he went and got a tissue and dropped it on the wee!

Good doggy!

You're joking, right?!

Trust you to pick a MENSA dog! :lol-053:

Admin
04-09-2012, 06:30
You're joking, right?!

Trust you to pick a MENSA dog! :lol-053:

He is very clever (I think)

I have just had a morning play with him (supervising Keeley really)

The first thing he did was run to the back door, and out he went for a pee! (good boy!)
then we had a play and he ran to the back door again... morning poo (good boy!)

Just starting to control his nipping play now... How?
When he nips you have to go "wooof" then he starts licking instead.

Oscarsmum
04-09-2012, 08:07
i have two goldens, yes they shed they drool , their big but they are a huge part of my life, they comforted me when i was upset at the sudden loss of my dad, they can be left alone whilst i go to work( 4 hrs max) great company, good ice breaking when making new friends i could go on, not everyone is a dog lover am fine with that, however i made my choice to have mine because i wanted two goldens and i had the time and commitment now they are elderly i have to adjust but thats fine,
would i have another when their call to heaven comes??? yes definately, would i consider a rescue ?? yes theres too many abandoned dogs that deserve a good home..................

San846
04-09-2012, 08:14
It's got to be a miniature schnauzer, no shedding, great little characters and don't need loads of exercise, the fact that I have two is totally irrelevant :))

NeilyG
04-09-2012, 08:55
Ha ha - like the wee/tissue windup, Phil. Sounds like you're giving him good 'positive' puppy training - ie. not punishing too much when he gets it wrong and rewarding the little bugger when he does right.
You'll be training it to round us all up at future meets next. Baaah!

NeilyG
04-09-2012, 08:59
He is doing well, no problems last night.

He likes fuss then lets you know when hes had enough.

Tes taught him to sit on command today, I thought it was a fluke at first, but he is happy to repeat this.

He was watching us clean up his accidents with tissue yesterday. He missed his training pad tonight and wee'd on the floor slightly, he went and got a tissue and dropped it on the wee!

Good doggy!

Hope he doesn't get 'training pad' mixed up with 'iPad'. :cry:

Seahorse
04-09-2012, 11:19
Having read your initial comments Phil, i am surprised that you have ended up with a Bluemerle! They are incredible dogs, get it right and you will have a fantastic dog, get it wrong and you will have a bossy monster that will rule you and your family!

Please dont get me wrong i am sure you did your research before you picked up Bosely, so you and the family should have a good idea of whats in store. Border Collies do need a lot of exercise ( as do most dogs), but they require a lot of mental exercise as well, this can be taxing as they are quick to learn and therefore you are constantly needing to think of ways to work them.
Without the right physical and mental activity they become bored and very often destructive.

I am afraid i do get out of my highchair a little bit over border collies as rescue centres are overflowing with dogs where people didnt understand what they were taking on, many of these dogs never get rehomed because they are to scewed up!!

Not sure where the advice came from to woof at your puppy when it nips, i think you would do far better with a firm NO!!

Anyway enough of the lecturing, i wish you, your family and puppy a long and happy future.

From the proud and happy owner of a rescued Bluemerle.


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