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View Full Version : I love this time of year, so much wild food about.



Bushtrekker
06-08-2012, 20:17
I've just started watching a programme on More 4 called Jimmy's Forest during which he's cooking squirrel. At this time of year there is plenty of wild food about, from three quarter grown rabbits and young pigeons to berries, with the promise of blackberries and hazelnuts to come. The next couple of months are perfect for living off wild food and I'm off on Thursday with my rods, gun and nets to try to eat as much wild food as possible. At the weekend I was on Cannock Chase picking Cannock Chase berries, a hybrid between bilberry and cowberry, but other members of the same family can be found on most heathland sites.

A camper is the perfect way of making use of fresh ingredients caught or harvested from the wild, so I'm looking forward to this trip.

Doodles
06-08-2012, 20:20
I cant wait to see what i can learn from this show :)

Deleted user 21925
06-08-2012, 20:22
I cant wait to see what i can learn from this show :)

Me too. I'm fine with skinning animals or gutting fish etc. Not very confident with berries and mushrooms and the like!

kimbowbill
06-08-2012, 20:24
Me too. I'm fine with skinning animals or gutting fish etc. Not very confident with berries and mushrooms and the like!

i thought you knew your mushrooms :cool1::cool1:

Doodles
06-08-2012, 20:25
Me too. I'm fine with skinning animals or gutting fish etc. Not very confident with berries and mushrooms and the like!

Im pretty much the same i dont trust my mushroom hunting at all :)

Did you know you can starve to death eating rabbit?

Deleted user 21925
06-08-2012, 20:26
i thought you knew your mushrooms :cool1::cool1:

Thought I did until that purple anteater flew by...

Deleted user 21925
06-08-2012, 20:27
Im pretty much the same i dont trust my mushroom hunting at all :)

Did you know you can starve to death eating rabbit?

Heard that recently somewhere. Apparently you burn more calories eating it than you get out of it!

Doodles
06-08-2012, 20:28
Thought I did until that purple anteater flew by...

We got some liberty caps growing in the allotment :) They can stay there too :rolleyes2:

Doodles
06-08-2012, 20:29
Heard that recently somewhere. Apparently you burn more calories eating it than you get out of it!

Exactly and all you need is one green to go with it and you are fine.Wierd isnt it?

Deleted user 21925
06-08-2012, 20:29
We got some liberty caps growing in the allotment :) They can stay there too :rolleyes2:

Prepare for a few Pm's!!!!!!!!

Doodles
06-08-2012, 20:30
Prepare for a few Pm's!!!!!!!!

:lol-049::lol-049::lol-049::lol-049::lol-049:

Bushtrekker
06-08-2012, 20:39
and are ideal for vegetarians because they are full of nuts.

One of the most easily recognisable and tasty fungi is the giant puffball and they will be around soon, look for a round ball the size of a football, slice it and fry in butter. You can avoid rabbit poisoning by eating fatty meats such as goose or duck, both of which come into season at the beginning of next month, although Canada geese are now on open license if they are causing damage, so can be shot at any time of year. Another easily recognisable fungus is a large orange bracket fungus called 'Chicken of the Woods', which freezes well and can be used in casseroles and curries during the Winter

Doodles
06-08-2012, 20:44
53.235704,-1.103708

Right on my doorstep we go here each year for our haul of chestnuts and plenty of birch trees for sap too as long as you repair the tree afterwords but im sure that goes without saying on here.

Deleted user 21925
06-08-2012, 20:46
and are ideal for vegetarians because they are full of nuts.

One of the most easily recognisable and tasty fungi is the giant puffball and they will be around soon, look for a round ball the size of a football, slice it and fry in butter. You can avoid rabbit poisoning by eating fatty meats such as goose or duck, both of which come into season at the beginning of next month, although Canada geese are now on open license if they are causing damage, so can be shot at any time of year. Another easily recognisable fungus is a large orange bracket fungus called 'Chicken of the Woods', which freezes well and can be used in casseroles and curries during the Winter

I am familiar with Giant Puffballs and Chicken of the woods as they are reasonably unmistakeable. It's the smaller varieties which make me nervous.

Doodles
06-08-2012, 20:51
Same here i learned about chicken of the woods from Hugh Fearnly :)

Bushtrekker
06-08-2012, 20:52
A few years ago I was listening to a programme on Radio 4 about fungi and the presenter was walking round a wood which the Polish interviewee said was one of the best in the area, then I realised they were in the woods behind my house. We used to get a lot of Ceps on the Chase, until the Forestry Commission started harvesting trees. They are good for drying, but tend to be full of maggots.

Deleted user 21925
06-08-2012, 20:55
53.235704,-1.103708

Right on my doorstep we go here each year for our haul of chestnuts and plenty of birch trees for sap too as long as you repair the tree afterwords but im sure that goes without saying on here.

Heard about Birch Sap, how do you use it?

Doodles
06-08-2012, 20:59
Anyone trap for signal crayfish i applied for a licence this year but was told that my local rivers were not considered at risk yet.Was not dissapointed to hear them say that of course but something i would like to trap love the things boiled with a load of garlic butter poured over them :tongue:

MORGANTHEMOON
06-08-2012, 20:59
Im pretty much the same i dont trust my mushroom hunting at all :)

Did you know you can starve to death eating rabbit?

Come to Wales the mushrooms are magic here (so they say)

kimbowbill
06-08-2012, 21:01
We got some liberty caps growing in the allotment :) They can stay there too :rolleyes2:

October meet maybe?????:scared::lol-053::rolleyes2:

Doodles
06-08-2012, 21:01
Heard about Birch Sap, how do you use it?

Drink it or make wine from it can also make similar to maple syrup from it but you need more than you shoud take really.

Deleted user 21925
06-08-2012, 21:03
Anyone trap for signal crayfish i applied for a licence this year but was told that my local rivers were not considered at risk yet.Was not dissapointed to hear them say that of course but something i would like to trap love the things boiled with a load of garlic butter poured over them :tongue:

Have caught Crayfish using a baited dropnet in the Great Ouse before now. Haven't bothered since licencing laws applied. There are a large amount of American Signal Crayfish in the Ouse nowadays so I don't suppose getting a license would be difficult. (Would have thought it would be the same up your way in the Trent though).

Bushtrekker
06-08-2012, 21:06
I meant to buy one of the D shaped nets they used to keep in the camper, but didn't get used to it. I've always been interested in primitive hunting techniques, but unfortunately the laws in this country stop their use, which is a pity, as other countries are more tolerant of things such as bow fishing.

Doodles
06-08-2012, 21:09
Have caught Crayfish using a baited dropnet in the Great Ouse before now. Haven't bothered since licencing laws applied. There are a large amount of American Signal Crayfish in the Ouse nowadays so I don't suppose getting a license would be difficult. (Would have thought it would be the same up your way in the Trent though).

Thats what i thought but apparently not.

Firefox
06-08-2012, 21:09
We got some liberty caps growing in the allotment :) They can stay there too :rolleyes2:

Are you sure they're liberty caps? They don't usually appear till late September, and October is the best time. You can almost set your calendar by them!

Doodles
06-08-2012, 21:15
Are you sure they're liberty caps? They don't usually appear till late September, and October is the best time. You can almost set your calendar by them!

99% sure they are liberty caps i just put it down to weather and the vast amount of chicken poop ive spread around :) i will take a photo tomorrow i could be wrong.

maingate
06-08-2012, 21:25
If it's Rabbits you are after, it's no good going to the Northumberland coast.

Just got back and they have disappeared virtually from Bamburgh down to Low Newton-by-the sea. The Whippets were bored stiff, only got one in a fortnight. I expect Boulmer will still be a hot spot though, they breed like Rabbits there. ;)

Firefox
06-08-2012, 21:58
99% sure they are liberty caps i just put it down to weather and the vast amount of chicken poop ive spread around :) i will take a photo tomorrow i could be wrong.

Well they do like dung. I've only ever found them in grassland with dung though. Usually cows, horses or sheep. Never heard of them in July/August before. It's a bit of a goal if you've encouraged them to grow in an allotment!

kimbowbill
06-08-2012, 22:38
Well they do like dung. I've only ever found them in grassland with dung though. Usually cows, horses or sheep. Never heard of them in July/August before. It's a bit of a goal if you've encouraged them to grow in an allotment!

mmmmm strange :tongue:


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