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Doodles
10-08-2012, 07:56
So yesterday i was on my way to have first part of a root canal done and upon arrival i explained the amount of pain i have been in over last few weeks.The dentist asked what i had been doing for pain relief so i told her that for the last three weeks literally every 4 hours i have been taking 2 paracetamol and 2 ibuprofin including through the night.Well that put a halt to my root canal instead i was asked to immediatley go to A&E as i may have accidently overdosed.So 6 hours later and 2 blood tests later i was told to stay clear from paracetamol for the forseeable future as i could have caused all sorts of damage to my liver etc to the point of being fatal.They told me if i had of continued for even just a few more days doing what i was things could have been very bad.I never thought for a moment i was harming myself as i thought you had to take them all at once to damage your organs.A lesson learned on my part hope no one else is doing something similar just to get rid of pain they have now prescribed me a different pain killer to see me through until work is completed.

mariesnowgoose
10-08-2012, 08:17
Ooooo nasty.

Nothing worse than root problems with teeth.

Hope you're feeling a bit better - at least you found out about the overdosing!!!

kimbowbill
10-08-2012, 08:33
pfft, don't remind me of toothache, i took more than that, and they new it, they never batted an eye lid, i had no choice, the pain, oh my, my heart goes out to you Will, hope they get it sorted for you quick enough, my regular dentist said there's no such thing as pain, ha, i wanted to punch her in face and ask if that hurt, lol,

Smaug
10-08-2012, 14:35
I read an article once that said Paracetamol is an extremely dangerous drug to take long term as the damage is irreversible, yet they could add a drug to minimise the damage done for a slight increase in the cost. But the drug companies won't do it as it may reduce their profits/ sales.

It has been around a while & is so readily available & cheap that we assume it is harmless.

Firefox
10-08-2012, 14:41
I reccomend listerine original or gin for toothache. Keep the tooth bathed in it for a few mins. Eventually some alcohol sinks into the cavity and kills the infection.

QFour
10-08-2012, 14:55
As with all pain killers read the label.

You are better off taking 2 paracetamol and then 2 ibuprofin 2 hours later.

In this way you have the maximum dose of pain killer working all the while whereas taking 4 tablets every
4 hours leaves a gap in pain killing after about 3 hours.

You can make yourself rather ill with paracetamol. I have a TShirt from a few years ago. Doctor thought
I was suffering from a bad dose of flue. Eventually I stopped the paracetamol and got better.

Ian

lotty
10-08-2012, 19:02
toothache, ouch! :scared:
I hope they sort you out soon.

baloothebear
11-08-2012, 05:31
I had a similar experience to notthedoodles but my Dentist didn't bother to send me off to Hospital.
I was taking Ibuprofen and Paracetamol like Smarties for the best part of 2 weeks - couldn't get to see an emergency Dentist for love or money
I've had several full body scans and innumerable blood tests since then because of an on-going problem and no one has mentioned it as having causing irreparable damage

mariesnowgoose
11-08-2012, 08:21
Back in the jurassic era, when I was a teenager, I had a nasty root-infected tooth from a dentist who was a butcher.

My mother took me to new dentist who prescribed some wonderful tablets a bit like a lozenge.
You sucked them and it numbed the pain. Brilliant, never known anything like them before or since.
I used them until he could get the problem fixed a few days later.

Can't remember what the tablets were. They were absolutely bl**dy magic, but I've never been able to find anything out about them to this day. :(

There must be some doctors or nurses in here who are up on drugs who might be able to advise?

You may not get something like this automatically prescribed as everything is budgeted these days.
But if we knew what they were you could perhaps demand a prescription, as long as they were safe for you to use.

Burtie
11-08-2012, 09:35
I had a crown fitted to one of my back teeth
but they had to prepare the tooth first he set about
grinding it down into a square post then I had to
bite on a mold I had to wait four weeks before I had it
fitted but I had toothache and sensativity
for three of those weeks brushing after every meal
then it just went off on getting the crown fitted I had
toothache for two days now everythings fine

Doodles
12-08-2012, 07:20
Back in the jurassic era, when I was a teenager, I had a nasty root-infected tooth from a dentist who was a butcher.

My mother took me to new dentist who prescribed some wonderful tablets a bit like a lozenge.
You sucked them and it numbed the pain. Brilliant, never known anything like them before or since.
I used them until he could get the problem fixed a few days later.

Can't remember what the tablets were. They were absolutely bl**dy magic, but I've never been able to find anything out about them to this day. :(

There must be some doctors or nurses in here who are up on drugs who might be able to advise?

You may not get something like this automatically prescribed as everything is budgeted these days.
But if we knew what they were you could perhaps demand a prescription, as long as they were safe for you to use.

Where they called Zomig rapimelt i have them but i get prescribed them for severe migrane they are a lozenge that dissolves instantly and the pain is gone.I didnt even think to use them for toothache lol.

mariesnowgoose
12-08-2012, 07:30
Where they called Zomig rapimelt i have them but i get prescribed them for severe migrane they are a lozenge that dissolves instantly and the pain is gone.I didnt even think to use them for toothache lol.

Blimey! I was only 14 at the time. I can't even remember how many teeth I still had back then :lol-049:

Sounds like it might have been something similar though.

Have you tried them for your toothache yet?

kimbowbill
12-08-2012, 08:46
Apparently Clove oil is good too, i bought some for mine but after taking anti biotics i didn't need to use it, how is the toothache Will?

Bigpeetee
12-08-2012, 09:13
Where they called Zomig rapimelt i have them but i get prescribed them for severe migrane they are a lozenge that dissolves instantly and the pain is gone.I didnt even think to use them for toothache lol.

Looking at this, it's NOT for tooth ache!!!!

Zomig Rapimelt
(zolmitriptan)

In this factsheet:
How does Zomig Rapimelt work? What will it do for me?
How should I use Zomig Rapimelt?
What form(s) does Zomig Rapimelt come in?
Who should NOT take Zomig Rapimelt?
What side effects are possible with Zomig Rapimelt?
Are there any other precautions or warnings for Zomig Rapimelt?
What other drugs could interact with Zomig Rapimelt?
DIN (Drug Identification Number)02243045 ZOMIG RAPIMELT 2.5MG ORALLY DISINTEGRATING TABLET


How does Zomig Rapimelt work? What will it do for me?

Zolmitriptan belongs to a class of medications known as 5-hydroxytryptamine agonists (also called triptans). It is used to treat migraine headaches with or without aura (warning signs that occur prior to the onset of a migraine headache). The pain of migraine headaches is thought to be caused by dilated blood vessels inside the head. Zolmitriptan relieves migraine headaches by constricting these blood vessels.

Zolmitriptan is not recommended for other types of headache or for headache prevention. In most people, zolmitriptan eliminates or reduces the symptoms of migraines including headache, nausea, vomiting, and sensitivity to light and sound.

Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than the ones listed in these drug information articles. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are taking this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop taking this medication without consulting your doctor.

Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to take this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it.
How should I use Zomig Rapimelt?

The recommended adult dose is a single dose of 2.5 mg. If the migraine headache returns, the dose may be repeated after 2 hours. You should not take a total dose of more than 10 mg in any 24-hour period. If a dose has not helped your headache at all, do not take a second dose without first consulting a doctor.

Zolmitriptan dispersible tablets should be used as follows:
Peel the blister pack open as shown on the foil (do not push the tablets through the foil).
Place the tablet on the tongue, where it will dissolve with your saliva. Because this tablet is dispersible, you do not need to take it with water.
Do not split the tablet in half.

It is important to use this medication exactly as recommended by your doctor.

Many things can affect the dose of medication that a person needs, such as body weight, other medical conditions, and other medications. If your doctor has recommended a dose different from the ones listed here, do not change the way that you are taking the medication without consulting your doctor.

Store this medication at room temperature, protect it from moisture, and keep it out of the reach of children.

Do not dispose of medications in wastewater (e.g. down the sink or in the toilet) or in household garbage. Ask your pharmacist how to dispose of medications that are no longer needed or have expired.


What form(s) does Zomig Rapimelt come in?

Each orally dispersible, white, round uncoated tablet, intagliated "Z" on one side with a bevelled-edge, contains zolmitriptan 2.5 mg. Nonmedicinal ingredients: aspartame, citric acid, colloidal silicon dioxide, crospovidone, magnesium stearate, mannitol, microcrystalline cellulose, orange flavour, and sodium bicarbonate.
Who should NOT take Zomig Rapimelt?

Do not use zolmitriptan if you:
are allergic to zolmitriptan or any ingredients of the medication
are taking monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors (e.g., phenelzine, tranylcypromine) or have taken them within the past 2 weeks
do not have a clear diagnosis of migraine
have angina (chest pain), including Prinzmetal's angina (coronary vasospasm)
have blood vessel disease (e.g., ischemic bowel disease, Raynaud's syndrome, stroke, transient ischemic attacks [TIAs])
have certain types of migraine headaches (including hemiplegic, basilar, or ophthalmoplegic migraine)
have had a heart attack
have heart disease (e.g., heart valve disease, ischemic heart disease, abnormal heart rhythms, congenital heart disease)
have severe or uncontrolled high blood pressure
have taken another 5-hydroxytryptamine agonist (i.e., naratriptan, sumatriptan, rizatriptan) in the previous 24 hours
have taken ergotamine-containing or ergot-type medications (such as dihydroergotamine, ergotamine, or methysergide) in the previous 24 hours

What side effects are possible with Zomig Rapimelt?

Many medications can cause side effects. A side effect is an unwanted response to a medication when it is taken in normal doses. Side effects can be mild or severe, temporary or permanent.

The side effects listed below are not experienced by everyone who takes this medication. If you are concerned about side effects, discuss the risks and benefits of this medication with your doctor.

The following side effects have been reported by at least 1% of people taking this medication. Many of these side effects can be managed, and some may go away on their own over time.

Contact your doctor if you experience these side effects and they are severe or bothersome. Your pharmacist may be able to advise you on managing side effects.
changes in taste sensation
dizziness
drowsiness
dry mouth
feeling sick or vomiting
heartburn or indigestion
nausea
sore throat
unusual tiredness or muscle weakness

Although most of the side effects listed below don't happen very often, they could lead to serious problems if you do not seek medical attention.

Check with your doctor as soon as possible if any of the following side effects occur:
fast, pounding, or irregular heartbeat

Stop taking the medication and seek immediate medical attention if any of the following occur:
convulsions (seizures)
fast or irregular breathing
heart attack (symptoms include pain, pressure, tightness, or heaviness in the chest, jaw, neck, or shoulder; sweating; or shortness of breath)
sensations of tingling, heat, heaviness or pressure, dizziness, tiredness, or feeling sick
severe allergic reaction (symptoms include: swelling of the face or throat; hives; difficulty breathing)
stroke; symptoms include:
sudden confusion or problems with speech
sudden dizziness or loss of coordination
sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body
sudden severe headache, especially if it seems different from your usual headaches
sudden vision problems in one or both eyes
sudden or severe abdominal pain, stomach pain, or bloody diarrhea

Some people may experience side effects other than those listed. Check with your doctor if you notice any symptom that worries you while you are taking this medication.


Are there any other precautions or warnings for Zomig Rapimelt?

Before you begin taking a medication, be sure to inform your doctor of any medical conditions or allergies you may have, any medications you are taking, whether you are pregnant or breast-feeding, and any other significant facts about your health. These factors may affect how you should take this medication.

Allergic reactions: Rare, severe allergic reactions to zolmitriptan may occur. Because of the possibility of allergic reaction, you should not use zolmitriptan if you are allergic to any of the other medications of this class (5-hydroxytryptamine agonists).

Blood pressure: Zolmitriptan may cause an increase in blood pressure. If you have severe or uncontrolled high blood pressure you should not take zolmitriptan.

Drowsiness/reduced alertness: You may feel drowsy as a result of taking zolmitriptan. Do not perform tasks requiring alertness (e.g., driving or operating machinery) if you experience drowsiness or dizziness.

Heart disease: This medication may cause narrowing of the blood vessels that supply the heart. This can lead to chest pain, heart attacks, and other heart problems. For this reason, you should not use zolmitriptan if you have heart or blood vessel disease. If you have certain risk factors for heart disease (e.g., high blood pressure, high cholesterol, smoking, obesity, diabetes, family history of coronary artery disease, menopause, men over 40 years of age), tell your doctor.

Liver disease: Liver disease should be closely monitored by a doctor while taking this medication. You may need a lower dosage of zolmitriptan.

Seizures: There have been rare reports of seizures experienced by people taking this medication. If you have a history of epilepsy or other conditions that increase the risk for seizure your doctor should closely monitor you while taking this medication.

Pregnancy: This medication should not be used during pregnancy unless the benefits outweigh the risks. If you become pregnant while taking this medication, contact your doctor immediately.

Breast-feeding: It is not known if zolmitriptan passes into breast milk. If you are a breast-feeding mother and are taking this medication, it may affect your baby. Talk to your doctor about whether you should continue breast-feeding.

Children and adolescents: The safety and effectiveness of using this medication have not been established for children or adolesents.

Seniors: The use of zolmitriptan by people over the age of 65 years is not recommended.
What other drugs could interact with Zomig Rapimelt?

There may be an interaction between zolmitriptan and any of the following:
aminophen
birth control pills
cimetidine
ergot-containing medications (e.g., dihydroergotamine, ergotamine, or methysergide) if taken at the same time or within the previous 24 hours
MAO inhibitors (e.g., tranylcypromine, phenelzine, moclobemide) if taken at the same time or within 14 days of taking zolmitriptan
other 5-hydroxytryptamine agonists (e.g., naratriptan, rizatriptan, sumatriptan) if taken at the same time or within the previous 24 hours
propranolol
quinolone antibiotics (e.g., ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin)
SSRI or SNRI antidepressants (e.g., paroxetine, fluoxetine, sertraline, fluvoxamine, venlafaxine)
sibutramine

If you are taking any of these medications, speak with your doctor or pharmacist. Depending on your specific circumstances, your doctor may want you to:
stop taking one of the medications,
change one of the medications to another,
change how you are taking one or both of the medications, or
leave everything as is.

An interaction between two medications does not always mean that you must stop taking one of them. Speak to your doctor about how any drug interactions are being managed or should be managed.

Medications other than those listed above may interact with this medication. Tell your doctor or prescriber about all prescription, over-the-counter (non-prescription), and herbal medications you are taking. Also tell them about any supplements you take. Since caffeine, alcohol, the nicotine from cigarettes, or street drugs can affect the action of many medications, you should let your prescriber know if you use them.

vindiboy
13-08-2012, 08:59
Th problem with these drugs is the dosage contained, some Paracetamol are 200mg and some are 500mg so you need to be very careful as to which you are using same with all tablets too.I sympathise with your tooth pain, I had a tooth removed three weeks ago now and the hole is just about closed now and it has been very uncomfortable all the time.Salt water rinses frequently helped .


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