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matttransitconnect
20-01-2013, 18:40
Hi all. I've been using a camping stove in my van running off a blue camping gas bottle now for around 4 years. Carbon monoxide alarm has never gone off. Gas turned off when not cooking. However this weekend u cooked with doors and windows closed and for the first time stood watching the alarm. It registered max of 23 ppm. Im wondering if this is normal and I should just make sure I have more ventilation when cooking? Or is my stove faulty? The plan is to fit a smev eventually do these have all the same issues? Thanks in advance!

FULL TIMER
20-01-2013, 18:53
No gas appliances should be used in a van without ventilation for the reasons you have found, most vans these day's have plenty of ventilation with permamently vented roof vents and gas drop outs etc but personally I still have a window partly open when using the cooker (helps with the condensation too) and better safe than sorry, ............Mark

Seahorse
20-01-2013, 19:32
No gas appliances should be used in a van without ventilation for the reasons you have found, most vans these day's have plenty of ventilation with permamently vented roof vents and gas drop outs etc but personally I still have a window partly open when using the cooker (helps with the condensation too) and better safe than sorry, ............Mark

Tqtally agree with these comments, be safe.

Firefox
21-01-2013, 17:51
35 ppm (0.0035%)
Headache and dizziness within six to eight hours of constant exposure


100 ppm (0.01%)
Slight headache in two to three hours


200 ppm (0.02%)
Slight headache within two to three hours; loss of judgment


400 ppm (0.04%)
Frontal headache within one to two hours


800 ppm (0.08%)
Dizziness, nausea, and convulsions within 45 min; insensible within 2 hours


1,600 ppm (0.16%)
Headache, tachycardia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tachycardia), dizziness, and nausea within 20 min; death in less than 2 hours


3,200 ppm (0.32%)
Headache, dizziness and nausea in five to ten minutes. Death within 30 minutes.


6,400 ppm (0.64%)
Headache and dizziness in one to two minutes. Convulsions, respiratory arrest, and death in less than 20 minutes.


12,800 ppm (1.28%)
Unconsciousness after 23 breaths. Death in less than three minutes.






0.1 ppm
Natural atmosphere level (MOPITT (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MOPITT))[37] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_monoxide_poisoning#cite_note-37)


0.5 to 5 ppm
Average level in homes[38] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_monoxide_poisoning#cite_note-EPAFAQ-38)


5 to 15 ppm
Near properly adjusted gas stoves in homes[38] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_monoxide_poisoning#cite_note-EPAFAQ-38)


100 to 200 ppm
Exhaust from automobiles in the Mexico City (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mexico_City) central area[39] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_monoxide_poisoning#cite_note-39)


5,000 ppm
Exhaust from a home wood fire[40] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_monoxide_poisoning#cite_note-Gosink-40)


7,000 ppm
Undiluted warm car exhaust without a catalytic converter (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catalytic_converter)[40 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_monoxide_poisoning#cite_note-Gosink-40)




>>>> 23 ppm is high. Probably you should increase ventilation or adjustment of flame to get that down to 5 to 10 ppm to be on the safe side (referring to above).

Firefox
21-01-2013, 23:07
Figures above from Wikipedia by the way.

One thing I just noticed - exhaust from a wood burner - very high lethal levels of CO. So if fitting a wood burner inside a van, a decent well sealed flue and good draw is extremely important.

ubuntu1
22-01-2013, 07:52
23ppm is getting towards the worrying level and you should think about some professional help.

matttransitconnect
18-02-2013, 17:31
thanks for the advice everyone! I bought a new stove and it has solved the problem. Everyone should have an alarm with them...I would never have known otherwise

francophile1947
18-02-2013, 19:59
thanks for the advice everyone! I bought a new stove and it has solved the problem. Everyone should have an alarm with them...I would never have known otherwise

It won't solve the problem if you block the ventilation, like you did before:scared:


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