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Jacana851
27-10-2013, 13:03
Hi

Anyone been camping with a motorhome in Iceland? We are between vans at the moment and so thought might take the chance to hire a campervan in Reykavik next summer and spend 10-14 days travelling the main route around Iceland. I am sure previously I read somewhere that it is acceptable to wild camp in Iceland. Anyone have any personal experience of this?

Helen

sasquatch
27-10-2013, 14:46
Ask Kerry Katona!
Seriously I would certainly be interested in any responses-good luck.

lebesset
27-10-2013, 15:23
my best friend has just spent the summer [ 2 months ] wilding there without problems
spent a night in the camp site in the faroes on the way back when he spent a week there

only problem was he likes to fish , and one day a week provided more than he could eat

oldish hippy
27-10-2013, 15:27
pm tony lee he been to iceland


http://www.wildcamping.co.uk/forums/wild-camping-motorhome-chat/21658-lpg-iceland.html there is link as his signature

iveco4x4
28-10-2013, 19:00
Its pretty easy to wildcamp in iceland but often not nessesary as towns / villages often have free campsites, and they have good swimming facilities too which you can use the showers / changing or go for a nice thermally heated swim

For some insperation try here

Iceland 2004 (http://www.101fc.net/iceland-2004/index.htm)

Mine was the orange stripey one

Just note - some of the roads we took were 4x4 only and also note the 'next fuel stop 208km' so fill up when you can

Rich

mark61
29-10-2013, 08:38
What a great trip. Wonderful pictures. Love the trucks too, although I confess to being a sucker for those Austrian beasts.

iveco4x4
29-10-2013, 19:34
You mean the ones that are now built in the UK , or at least the british forces ones were

Took 2 of them to replace every one tonne landrover - landys were built be overloaded

Rich

Tony Lee
30-10-2013, 00:41
Six years ago there were a few towns with excellent free camps - heated amenities blocks, camp kitchens and free electricity and dump points but this last time some of those had started charging but even then, provided you use a bit of commonsense, there are plenty of places with fantastic views and great locations. A few of the national parks also have free basic camping.

Another option that suited us this time because we were there for 9 or 10 weeks is to buy a camping card for 100 euro and that allows free camping at 47 camp sites scattered all across iceland.You pay for electricity and the bed tax, but the camping fees are zero. The promoter lost a heap on us because we stayed longer than normal.

Seemed to me that the huge increase in the number of tourists in the 6 years between trips was for the worse as prices have gone up and freedoms gone down - but was still worth a second visit.

Easy to find dump points as few of the municipal campsites had any restrictions on outsiders driving in.

A week in the Faroes?? I was very happy that the schedule had changed this time and we weren't dumped off there for a three day enforced contribution to the economy. Not that we did because even there, it was quite easy to wild camp provided you didn't expect to find shelter in a nice thick forest.

Just get used to pointing one end or the other into the wind when either you camp or pee outside.

LPG is much more available now and many places have swap cylinders. One type had a valve and POL fitting and the other type didn't have a manual valve. I took enough in the fixed tank and German cylinders so didn't have any problems with having to match the local ones. Did ask if they sold the tanks and that was no problem and no contract or ID was needed.

Captain Biggles
30-10-2013, 01:48
Ask Kerry Katona!
Seriously I would certainly be interested in any responses-good luck.



Nice one Sasquatch, good to have a bit of humour at 02:45 hrs! Keep it coming...


And good luck to our intrepid adventurers, I look forward to reading more! :have fun:

Captain Biggles

Jacana851
26-05-2014, 17:00
Just an update for anyone who may be interested. We have just come back from 2 weeks in Iceland and can now answer my own question. Iceland is brilliant for wild camping!!
We rented a fiat ducato with pickup near the airport. At 103 Euros per day it seemed pretty reasonable (for Iceland) and was much less expensive that summer prices. There is a reason for the low prices of course- the weather is still a bit nippy. We took the ring road and had one nigth at minus 7 C with snow, but the van has a heater and gas was included so we used it!

We wild camped for 12 nights with the last night spent at a free camp site north of the airport (Gardur)/ The free campsite was more of a carpark with toilets, water and WC disposal -which we needed as the van needed to be returned empty, but only one other van in the campsite whearas we had passed the paying campsite at Grindavik which was pretty full- more fool them!

It was easy to find places to stop overnight. We mostly used the plentiful picnic sites. The only restrictions were arourd Lake Myvatyn and in the national park areas. One place we did not stop at night because we did not think it would be allowed was the Jokursson glacier lake but in fact there were no restrictions whatsoever and it would have been a fab place to stop overnight. Even Geyser had a carpark with no overnight restrictions.

Being early in the year some roads were still closed and so we kept mostly to the main roads although in S Iceland they say they hardly get any snow so no problems there.
Virtually every fuel station has a hosepipe and they freely allow campers to fill up with water + 3 N1 fuel stations and one Ollis fuel station had WC dumps so there was never a problem.
There is also the option of using the local swimming pools/ hot tubs with shared showers. I did this the once but actually prefered to shower in the van which had a decent shower cubicle (one of those that enclosed part of the corridor when you want abit more space to shower in).
We went round clockwise, preferiing to leave the best bits to last so we could take our time, total 2400 km travelled.
Being mean we did not eat out and shopped in the Bonus supermarkets for best prices.Cost of whole trip with rental, flights and food and fuel was £1700 which I thought was not bad.

H

john t
26-05-2014, 17:28
Was that £1700 each or for the both of you, got to admit, Iceland is on my to do list.!

jt

Jacana851
05-09-2014, 15:56
Sorry for the late reply- not having a motorhome at the moment I don't log in very often!
Yes that was £1700 for both of us, so a cheap way to visit Iceland but only out of season- price hike++ beginning of June but May was a great time to visit Iceland.

H

CampersIceland
30-03-2017, 10:33
Just an update for anyone who may be interested. We have just come back from 2 weeks in Iceland and can now answer my own question. Iceland is brilliant for wild camping!!
We rented a fiat ducato with pickup near the airport. At 103 Euros per day it seemed pretty reasonable (for Iceland) and was much less expensive that summer prices. There is a reason for the low prices of course- the weather is still a bit nippy. We took the ring road and had one nigth at minus 7 C with snow, but the van has a heater and gas was included so we used it!

We wild camped for 12 nights with the last night spent at a free camp site north of the airport (Gardur)/ The free campsite was more of a carpark with toilets, water and WC disposal -which we needed as the van needed to be returned empty, but only one other van in the campsite whearas we had passed the paying campsite at Grindavik which was pretty full- more fool them!

It was easy to find places to stop overnight. We mostly used the plentiful picnic sites. The only restrictions were arourd Lake Myvatyn and in the national park areas. One place we did not stop at night because we did not think it would be allowed was the Jokursson glacier lake but in fact there were no restrictions whatsoever and it would have been a fab place to stop overnight. Even Geyser had a carpark with no overnight restrictions.

Being early in the year some roads were still closed and so we kept mostly to the main roads although in S Iceland they say they hardly get any snow so no problems there.
Virtually every fuel station has a hosepipe and they freely allow campers to fill up with water + 3 N1 fuel stations and one Ollis fuel station had WC dumps so there was never a problem.
There is also the option of using the local swimming pools/ hot tubs with shared showers. I did this the once but actually prefered to shower in the van which had a decent shower cubicle (one of those that enclosed part of the corridor when you want abit more space to shower in).
We went round clockwise, preferiing to leave the best bits to last so we could take our time, total 2400 km travelled.
Being mean we did not eat out and shopped in the Bonus supermarkets for best prices.Cost of whole trip with rental, flights and food and fuel was £1700 which I thought was not bad.

H

Hi there!
I know this is a few years late but we want to be known that wild camping in Iceland in campers, caravans and RV's is now forbidden. You can read about it here: Changed camper laws (http://www.rent.is/blog/changed-camper-laws)
Lets hope it wont deter you from traveling around here for it is truly stunning! :)
Happy Camping!

Morphology
30-03-2017, 12:37
Hi there!
I know this is a few years late but we want to be known that wild camping in Iceland in campers, caravans and RV's is now forbidden. You can read about it here: Changed camper laws (http://www.rent.is/blog/changed-camper-laws)
Lets hope it wont deter you from traveling around here for it is truly stunning! :)
Happy Camping!

Thank you for the update - I am off there at the end of April, so will bear this in mind.

How does this law apply to, for example, carparks such as those at Jökulsárlón - are there now 'No Overnighting' signs? How do you find out who the landowner is to ask permission?

As far as I can tell, the majority of campsites will still be closed in April (though I am aware many simply let you 'camp' for free), so is this change only likely to be enforced during the more popular summer months?

Morph

vindiboy
30-03-2017, 12:55
Its pretty easy to wildcamp in iceland but often not nessesary as towns / villages often have free campsites, and they have good swimming facilities too which you can use the showers / changing or go for a nice thermally heated swim

For some insperation try here

Iceland 2004 (http://www.101fc.net/iceland-2004/index.htm)

Mine was the orange stripey one

Just note - some of the roads we took were 4x4 only and also note the 'next fuel stop 208km' so fill up when you can

Rich HHMMM! , my Computer says I am Forbidden to open your link, tried it several times with same response ??

Morphology
30-03-2017, 13:53
HHMMM! , my Computer says I am Forbidden to open your link, tried it several times with same response ??

I imagine the link has long-since expired, as it was posted in Oct 2013

CampersIceland
31-03-2017, 08:09
Thank you for the update - I am off there at the end of April, so will bear this in mind.

How does this law apply to, for example, carparks such as those at Jökulsárlón - are there now 'No Overnighting' signs? How do you find out who the landowner is to ask permission?

As far as I can tell, the majority of campsites will still be closed in April (though I am aware many simply let you 'camp' for free), so is this change only likely to be enforced during the more popular summer months?

Morph

Hi there!
As far as I can understand, car parks are off limits too but just ask wherever you are. Many are very liberal and if one asks, I've heard you get a yes at most places. I have also contemplated as how to find the landowner. I guess the easiest way is to ask at the local gas station (http://www.rent.is/blog/gas-stations-in-iceland) who the owner is. Gas stations often works as a social hub in the small villages.
There are more and more campsites that are open all year around and we wrote about it in this bog here "Open all year around campsites (http://www.rent.is/blog/open-all-year-campsites-in-iceland)" but we recently got a comment that a campsite on the list wasn't open. The ones who made the interactive map told me they are updating it all the time so I guess it will be more or less correct at all times.
I hope this helps. Have a great trip!
Cheers

Deleted user 21925
31-03-2017, 08:47
Dammit!

Myself and my son in law had planned to camp in Iceland early next year, but campsites were not on the agenda. I had a chat with him last night and we have decided to go for a week in Sweden instead, hopefully it will be easier there.

Unless anybody can tell me any different?

Morphology
01-04-2017, 05:40
Hi there!
As far as I can understand, car parks are off limits too but just ask wherever you are. Many are very liberal and if one asks, I've heard you get a yes at most places. I have also contemplated as how to find the landowner. I guess the easiest way is to ask at the local gas station (http://www.rent.is/blog/gas-stations-in-iceland) who the owner is. Gas stations often works as a social hub in the small villages.
There are more and more campsites that are open all year around and we wrote about it in this bog here "Open all year around campsites (http://www.rent.is/blog/open-all-year-campsites-in-iceland)" but we recently got a comment that a campsite on the list wasn't open. The ones who made the interactive map told me they are updating it all the time so I guess it will be more or less correct at all times.
I hope this helps. Have a great trip!
Cheers

Thanks - that's a handy map, and I'll certainly add those to my tablet before I go just in case I need them. If for no other reason, I'll need to find a campsite every few days to empty the loo & grey tank.

Morph

offgrid
01-04-2017, 09:34
Wish there was a ferry link from the UK to Iceland - does anyone even know if there is a commercial crossing?

Deleted user 21925
01-04-2017, 09:37
I think you can only get a ferry from Denmark. I could be wrong though.

We had planned to fly out and hire a motorhome out there for a week.

CampersIceland
03-04-2017, 08:07
Thank you for the update - I am off there at the end of April, so will bear this in mind.

How does this law apply to, for example, carparks such as those at Jökulsárlón - are there now 'No Overnighting' signs? How do you find out who the landowner is to ask permission?

As far as I can tell, the majority of campsites will still be closed in April (though I am aware many simply let you 'camp' for free), so is this change only likely to be enforced during the more popular summer months?

Morph

A good question. I really have no idea how people can find the owners except ask at for example gas station. Not sure about signs either. The new laws aren't exactly detailed! Sorry for not having more information! :(

CampersIceland
04-04-2017, 14:11
Wish there was a ferry link from the UK to Iceland - does anyone even know if there is a commercial crossing?

Hey there. You can take a ferry from Denmark that goes to Iceland. It also stops in Faroe islands which is a big plus! :)

Morphology
07-05-2017, 09:57
I'm just back from a 10-Day Solo trip to Iceland, and thought some might be interested in the costs etc.

In partial answer to my earlier question about where you can wildcamp, the Geysir motorhome rental guy said "you can stay anywhere as long as you are more than 100m form another building", though I don't think you could take that as being the letter of the law.

Most of the better-known attractions had 'No Overnight Camping' signs, and there were signs on entry to all of the national parks saying no Overnight camping except in designated camp sites. However there are loads of laybys, harbours etc where I'd feeel completely happy wildcamping.

As far as I know, and judging by comments in theis thread, the only way I could have got there with my own 'van would have been ferry via Denmark. That actually might have been cheaper than flying and renting a van, but would have taken longer and, as I still currently have a day job, time off is difficult.

So, I flew Gatwick - Reykjavik with Easyjet (leaving my car at Gatwick), and rented a van from motorhome.is I'm still slightly unsure what part they play in the process, but I *think* they are just a booking agent, as closer to my departure time they passed on details of where I should collect the Motorhome, which was from the Geysir car rental company. [Edit: it looks like motorhome.is is Geysir's dedicated motorhome rental website, rather than an agency]

Perhaps I was stung a bit, but Geysir were great, I was happy with the motorhome, and I bought all the additional insurances (Collision Damage waiver, Gravel protection etc).

I'm used to driving a 7m motorhome in the UK, so I went for a 'proper' Motorhome - there are loads of kids circuiting Iceland in what are essentially just Nissan NV200 vans with a bed in the back, a porta-potti, and a camping stove but I'm afraid that's not for me - you get used to being able to stand up, having a shower, heating, decent fridge & cooking facilities etc.

The van I ended up with was a Plasy H63 - coachbuilt on a Citroen chassis. 6-Speed manual, Diesel, about 6.3m long, 100 litre Water & Waste tanks. Although it was billed as a 3-Berth, you could have got 4 in it as it has 4 front-facing belted seats, and a drop-down bed in the lounge that could have slept 2 in addition to the fixed double at the back.

fairly conventional layout - Fixed cross-ways bed at the back, 3-burner stove, sink, low-level fridge, toilet & shower, with separate door for the shower. Front seats both swivelled round. It has a pretty large garage, which could have held bikes, tables & chairs etc., but was a bit wasted on me as I didn't rent any of those.

It had Truma heating, but it appeared to be gas-only. It didn't give me the option to use EHU on the one occasion I had mains hook-up.

It only had a single 10Kg LPG bottle so if it ran out in the middle of the night you'd be without cooking / heating until you bought a replacement. These seemed to be available at every petrol station but, rather than take the risk, I replaced mine before it completely ran out.

I was travelling in the last week of April / First week in May, which is before the main tourist season kicks off. I chose this time deliberately - I wanted some hours of darkness as I am more interested in the Northern Lights than the Midnight Sun, the Puffins and Whales should hopefully have already arrived for the summer, not too many tourists. The risks were that winter wasn't completely finished.

The only plan I had was that I'd quite like to be able to get all the way round Iceland on the N1 ring road which, according to Google should be about 800 miles - I felt that was easily do-able on a 10-day trip and Easyjet had flights on a Sunday & Wednesday so, out Sunday 23rd April, back a week the following Wednesday (3rd May). This also took in the UK May bank holiday, which saved me a day's annual leave.

Some assorted facts & observations:

- The scenery is pretty stunning
- I actually drove 1,600 miles. Not quite sure how that happened. I definitely didn't go round the N1 twice, but I did detour off it quite a bit
- I only stayed 2 nights on paid campsites
- A number (though by no means all) of garages have chemical toilet disposal points, gas bottle exchange, free water.
- A lot of the more popular sights have 'No Overnight Parking' signs in their car parks
- Some of the National parks have 'No camping except on designated campsites' signs as you enter them.
- There are still lots of rural laybys, picnic areas etc, with no visible restrictions and where I felt very happy to stay the night
- I stayed two nights on a campsites that hadn't yet opened for the summer. All the water / Showers etc., were off/locked, but they were a convenient stopover
- I ate mainly in the van, and only had a couple of meals out
- There are sections of the N1 in the east that are gravel, rather than tarmac
- A lot of the roads out to the rural communities are gravel, and often have a lot of potholes, which made slow going.
- At this time of the year, the F-roads into the interior are all still closed, but I believe I wouldn't have been permitted to take the van onto those, as they are 4x4 only, often cross fords etc.
- I saw the Northern Lights, Puffins and Whales which were the big-3 I hoped to see
- It was cold and very very windy. Max daytime temp was around 9C and there were days when the wind gusts were over 20 meters a second, which made driving difficult, though I only had 3 wet days - the rest were cold but clear.
- Mobile 3G data coverage was widespread and I was never knowingly out of signal. I just used roaming data on my normal O2 mobile contract (£1.66 per day), and used my phone as a hotspot when I wanted to access the Internet on my tablet. A lot of restaurants / campsites etc. have free wi fi.
- I was running a tracker on my phone so that friends / family could keep track of my progress. This posted live location updates to a Spotwalla map (see screenshot).
- The weather and road condition websites (www.road.is (http://www.road.is) and en.vedur.is (http://en.vedur.is)) are excellent and an invaluable resource
- I visited 4 geothermal pools. Two of which had paid entry, and one of which I was the only person there. I did NOT go to the Blue Lagoon
- The best place to buy alcohol is the Airport duty free on your way into Iceland
- Alcohol can only be bought in the government-run Vinbudin stores, which are scattered around the country, but which only open during certain fairly restricted hours.

The van came with a Garmin sat-nav, but I didn't use it. Instead I used Osmand+ on an 8" tablet, which is what I use in my own van. I had spent time before I went adding POIs for things I'd really like to visit, some nice-looking possible night spots etc., then Osmand+ really comes into its own when you want to find the next nearest petrol station / supermarket / campsite / government liquor store etc., absolutely invaluable and never put a foot wrong.

When I arrived in Iceland, sections of the N1 were still closed in the North East due to snow, though the weather forecast was good, so I set off round anyway and, sure enough, they were open by the time I got to those sections.

I sort-of immersed myself in Icelandic before I went:

- I did an 18-Hour audio course in Icelandic
- I read some of the Sagas
- I read translations of some modern & some classic Icelandic literature
- I watched numerous Youtube vids, Icelandic news websites

Having a smattering of Icelandic was nice, and was appreciated by the Icelanders I met though was absolutely not necessary - English is very widely spoken, and I think I spoke more French than Icelandic (there seemed to be more French tourists than any other Nationality, for some reason), but it was great to be able to sit in a cafe / supermarket / listen to spoken-word radio and be able to pick out the odd word here and there.

There were lots of North American tourists - it seems that if you fly from USA / Canada to Europe with Iceland Air, you can stopover for up to 7 Days in Iceland en route at no extra charge, so of course lots do.

Finally, a couple of photos, a map of my trip, and a breakdown of the cost - a slightly eye-watering £3,448.97

Enjoy!

Morph

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john1974
07-05-2017, 12:37
I did sort of similar a couple of years ago for my 40th.. I took a group there and hired a 4x4 and we took tents. fascinating place .. would like to return and get off the beaten track in various areas .I did the n1 anticlockwise but crossed an f road back..think f28 but not sure..I did track the route and have that somewhere .. agree that if you have the time and cash Denmark Fareo with your own vehicle. otherwise well worth a 'WOWAIR' flight and a long weekend there


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