PDA

View Full Version : Great wine ripoff.Is any one like me?



Shockingdog
10-11-2013, 18:59
On our last trip to France in September we purchased a few bottles of wine as you do. A Pouilly - Fuisse at €11.40 a bottle and also a Sauvignon blanc at €3 a bottle.With Sunday lunch we have just tryed the Pouilly -Fuuisse and then the Sauvignon Blanc. On balance we have to say the Sauvignon has it on taste. What is going on . Are we being ripped off with the Wine at € 11.40 ? Are our pallets not descriminating enough ? to taste the difference?

rugbyken
10-11-2013, 20:21
the Pouilly - Fuisse is more of a keeper most of the off the shelf wines like the sauvignon are fermented in a massive tank artificially aged etc and the bottle filled once its ready no grape in them to age/improve in the bottle so drink it straight of the shelf , still a lot of snobbishness on the wine circuit and at that price the Pouilly - Fuisse is a cheap example dont think its worth it myself on the rare occasions i drink a white barbis etc a colonial chardonay is good for me,
went to a civic reception in strasbourg once and was shocked, when what i thought was a rose turned out to be white with cassis[blackcurrant] added, talking to our host later he said all wine is like a spoilt child if you dont serve it how it wants to be served it will sulk, wine tells you what it wants so some reds can be served from the fridge some whites cool not chilled etc, one of his best bits of advice which i follow is that when we say a red should be served at room temprature it is our room temp not yours.

vindiboy
10-11-2013, 20:56
185071850818509185101851118512
I don't know a Sauvignon Blanc from a Sauvignon plonk, but I know what I like and they were certainly churning it out at this place in Italy where we overnighted on their free Sosta.HIC.

Teutone
10-11-2013, 21:18
it is a matter of taste said the monkey and eat the bar of soap......

I don't care how much something costs, if I like a the taste, I like the taste. 2.99 or 12.99 a bottle.
People going for the most expensive stuff are just showing off IMHO

Tezza33
10-11-2013, 21:46
I buy what I like to drink, if I am travelling in Europe I spend slightly more but if I am buying to bring home for everyday drinking I buy wine boxes to save the weight of the bottles, I decanter it from the box into something that looks better on the table which also improves the taste, a £12 bottle of wine bought in France only costs the extra duty here which is only a few quid so you get better value from cheaper wines because the extra duty is the same, if you bought the same bottle from Tesco for £14 and you didn't like it you can take it back for a refund, if I have bought it from France I can only use it for cooking and if it isn't good enough to drink you should not cook with it.
I go on a shopping trip and sit in the car park wine testing because the wine you liked last year is not necessarily the same this year, I bring back 160 to 200 ltrs of wine back at an average price of £2 per ltr in a Fiat Panda and save myself a lot of money albeit at the expense of my kidneys :p

MORGANTHEMOON
11-11-2013, 07:24
I'm a lover of red wine and I've become fussy and won't drink poor quality wine but as you say cost is not always a true indication of quality.

I purchased a bottle of wine in a market in Provence for 1 Euro and it was wonderful and if I'd realised how good it was I would have bought all they had.
I often watch what the French are buying in the supermarkets, not excactly a true science but I've had some excellent wines that are often on offer.
I've really been enjoying some Italian reds recently.

Some of the well known names are living on reputation like Châteauneuf- du - Pape, I really love a good bottle of this wine but some of them are pretty ordinary and not worth the money.

fairytooth
11-11-2013, 07:43
I wouldn't dream of spending over £7 unless I knew exactly what I was getting. You will find Marks & Spencer here have a very nice Pouilly Fuisse for around £10.

There is a superb white Sauvignon Blanc from LeCheteau in Vouvray actually made by a New Zealander and it gives any respectable NZ white a run for its money. At only £3 in Eurotunnel shop Coquelles, labelled as 'Kiwi Cuvee' and designed to look like a NZ white - fantastic value for the money. If you want to really splash out go to Majestic in Coquelles (nr the Auchan) and you can buy the LeCheteau Reserve for about £4 which is simply lovely.

You are saving about £2 duty on any bottle of still wine bought in France so obviously the more expensive the wine the less the benefit of buying over there, as a rule of thumb.

And here is a comment I found about P-F:

The only grape grown in the Pouilly-Fuissé region is Chardonnay (the same grape of the great whites of the Côte d'Or). There are no grand cru or premier cru vineyards in the region, although there are some vineyard locations (aka "climats") that are better than others. The wine style ranges from dry and fairly delicate to rich and full-bodied. And while the best Pouilly-Fuissés can be nearly as complex as their Côte d'Or village counterparts—and cost a lot less—the demand for them simply isn't there. No one seems to care about Pouilly-Fuissé—at least not like they used to.

Tbear
11-11-2013, 07:46
I buy what I like to drink, if I am travelling in Europe I spend slightly more but if I am buying to bring home for everyday drinking I buy wine boxes to save the weight of the bottles, I decanter it from the box into something that looks better on the table which also improves the taste, a £12 bottle of wine bought in France only costs the extra duty here which is only a few quid so you get better value from cheaper wines because the extra duty is the same, if you bought the same bottle from Tesco for £14 and you didn't like it you can take it back for a refund, if I have bought it from France I can only use it for cooking and if it isn't good enough to drink you should not cook with it.
I go on a shopping trip and sit in the car park wine testing because the wine you liked last year is not necessarily the same this year, I bring back 160 to 200 ltrs of wine back at an average price of £2 per ltr in a Fiat Panda and save myself a lot of money albeit at the expense of my kidneys :p

Got caught like that once Never again.

Richard

fairytooth
11-11-2013, 08:01
Got caught like that once Never again.

Richard

What, caught drinking in the car outside the supermarket you mean?:lol-049:

Frances
11-11-2013, 08:01
Last time I deliberately did a wine tasting in the van the choice was between a cheap and an expensive red which we tried with dinner. Hubby and I agreed the difference in taste bore no reflection to the cost of the wine and we couldn't tell the cheap from the expensive.

Since we didn't finish either wine, we repeated the test about 11 am the following morning. The more expensive wine tasted far better than it had the night before and the difference was obvious.

Anyone care to explain why?

fairytooth
11-11-2013, 08:06
Last time I deliberately did a wine tasting in the van the choice was between a cheap and an expensive red which we tried with dinner. Hubby and I agreed the difference in taste bore no reflection to the cost of the wine and we couldn't tell the cheap from the expensive.

Since we didn't finish either wine, we repeated the test about 11 am the following morning. The more expensive wine tasted far better than it had the night before and the difference was obvious.

Anyone care to explain why?

Yes. with RED wine, fine wine is produced in a way that it matures more slowly. This is the tannin which takes years to break down and create the complex flavours. Cheap reds don't have that and mature quickly or can be drunk very young but without the complexity of flavour. However, when you open an expensive red and leave it to 'breathe' for several hours (or even days) the development of the wine is speeded up dramatically. Hence your nice wine (opened much sooner than it should have been) was given the chance to show how it might have tasted in a few years.

ricc
11-11-2013, 08:22
i guess it depends on how you drink your wine and how much you drink. if you drink your wine with a meal your not going to notice the subtleties of taste that you might if you were drinking without eating.. . ive just been to malaga for a week to see family...first day there.in the super sol. spanish red wine at 99c a bottle, buy a couple of bottles...back the next day for more, i cant remember ever having to buy the 2nd cheapest on the 2nd day.
i think theres a lot of snobbery in the world of wine, i find supermarket hock and most bargain reds suits my tastebuds so dont see any point in spending more .

Shockingdog
11-11-2013, 14:31
It's amazing once you start talking about wine just how many memories and story's it evokes.Memory's of historic meals,with good friends and family and of epic drinking events in a misspent youth.Are those where the days ! ! Sadly my capacity for alcohol seems to be diminishing with age.

fairytooth
11-11-2013, 15:07
My ex-wife drove me to drink

Fortunately she also had the good sense to come and pick me up again at closing time

Deleted user 21925
11-11-2013, 15:44
My ex-wife drove me to drink

Fortunately she also had the good sense to come and pick me up again at closing time

My wife drove me too drink as well Graham.

I'll always love her for that.

Tbear
11-11-2013, 16:51
What, caught drinking in the car outside the supermarket you mean?:lol-049: You say that like its a bad thing
:confused:

We went to an English Vineyard and had smashing afternoon learning about vine types, wine production and tasting. I tried one which was really nice and only a few quid a bottle so we invested in a few. Tried one weeks later and it was like vinegar. Checked the bottle and it was the previous year to one we tasted. Not going to name them though as we a great time. They gave my daughter an orphaned lamb to bottle feed while we chatted. she didn't shut up about it for months afterwards.:)

Richard

loulou
11-11-2013, 16:55
It's amazing once you start talking about wine just how many memories and story's it evokes.Memory's of historic meals,with good friends and family and of epic drinking events in a misspent youth.Are those where the days ! ! Sadly my capacity for alcohol seems to be diminishing with age.

I suppose that your memory is like red wine.

You cant remember anything the morning after, but how the memories come flooding back years later.

:lol-049::cheers::tongue::raofl:

Deleted user 21925
11-11-2013, 17:17
I used to commute from Chelmsford into London, and it was always funny around Christmas time when people had over indulged before travelling home. I remember once that the train stopped about 200 yards short of Chelmsford station, presumably waiting for another train to depart. A sleeping drunk awoke in a panic and rushed for the door, only to drop about 4 feet onto the track and fall flat on his face. He sheepishly climbed back in and ran to the otherside of the train and dropped out of that door onto the track.

He didn't bother getting back in again, just walked up the track to the station!

MykCamper
11-11-2013, 17:32
:p Hair of the Dog !!!:dog:

Tezza33
11-11-2013, 20:36
. A sleeping drunk awoke in a panic and rushed for the door, only to drop about 4 feet onto the track and fall flat on his face. He sheepishly climbed back in and ran to the otherside of the train and dropped out of that door onto the track.
I thought you were going to say he climbed back in blew the whistle and continued driving to London

Firefox
11-11-2013, 23:40
I used to commute from Chelmsford into London, and it was always funny around Christmas time when people had over indulged before travelling home. I remember once that the train stopped about 200 yards short of Chelmsford station, presumably waiting for another train to depart. A sleeping drunk awoke in a panic and rushed for the door, only to drop about 4 feet onto the track and fall flat on his face. He sheepishly climbed back in and ran to the otherside of the train and dropped out of that door onto the track.

He didn't bother getting back in again, just walked up the track to the station!


He was lucky not to step off the edge of the Chelmer Valley viaduct!

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/81/Chelmsfordviaduct.jpg

I've seen a few trains stop on that, being just short of the station.

Cost is no guarantee of a good wine though it's an indicator. Taste if you can, but that's no use for many of the better bottles which will improve a lot with keeping a few years. Well so I've read anyway, I could never wait that long!

My fave at the moment is Australian Yellow Tail Shiraz - Carol put me on to that one. About £7.00 in Tesco (and many other outlets) it is a very consistent bottle. Very smooth drinking and it really does taste of liquorice and spices just like the tasting notes. I'm often disappointed by tasting notes which bear no resemblance to the wine, but this is an exception.

Amethyst
12-11-2013, 08:37
He was lucky not to step off the edge of the Chelmer Valley viaduct!

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/81/Chelmsfordviaduct.jpg

I've seen a few trains stop on that, being just short of the station.

Cost is no guarantee of a good wine though it's an indicator. Taste if you can, but that's no use for many of the better bottles which will improve a lot with keeping a few years. Well so I've read anyway, I could never wait that long!

My fave at the moment is Australian Yellow Tail Shiraz - Carol put me on to that one. About £7.00 in Tesco (and many other outlets) it is a very consistent bottle. Very smooth drinking and it really does taste of liquorice and spices just like the tasting notes. I'm often disappointed by tasting notes which bear no resemblance to the wine, but this is an exception.

I agree about the yellow tail wines they do a few and the merlot is also very nice. Nisa have it on offer here at the moment for 5.99 .

One of our local garages regularly has it on special at £5 its worth looking out for.

Rob

shaunr68
12-11-2013, 09:36
I have had quite a bit of success over the years with home brewed wine, both in kit form and also fruit wine from the garden (we made a lovely batch of apple and green bean wine a couple of years ago).

We have a kit from Wilkinsons fermenting on the landing in readiness for Christmas, Pinot Grigio (or Penis Gringo as I call it!) 20 quid for the 30-bottle kit and a few pounds for sugar, sterilising solution and demijohn corks, works out at less than a pound a bottle. :wacko:


CLICK HERE TO REMOVE THESE ADVERTS