PDA

View Full Version : What percentage......



Touringtheworld
13-12-2013, 11:15
My friend Paul asked me last night what percentage of Motor Caravaners are (ex) Teachers and/or Military.

Interesting question - I have met lots of both.

He thinks it could be as high as 70%

I couldn't even guess.

Your thoughts :-)

Sharon the Cat
13-12-2013, 11:22
Not me

john t
13-12-2013, 11:28
Strange question really, but as a mate of mine once said, i don't call my self a civilian, i call myself ex-military. Me i'm ex-military, (Green Howards), sadly now disbanded, and re-badged "The Yorkshire Regiment".

jt

Siimplyloco
13-12-2013, 11:55
Ex Sgt Royal Engineers, and V. proud of it! No whingers here.....
John

chrisinbrighton
13-12-2013, 12:00
not me

Gee
13-12-2013, 12:01
Guilty on both counts m'lord. Ex matelot and trade instructor at Defence College of Aeronautical Engineering.

Makzine
13-12-2013, 12:03
Not guilty but my partner teaches.

vindiboy
13-12-2013, 12:40
We are all Teachers, as when we tell someone something they did not know we have taught them something.Strange howsome people love statistic methinks.:fun::fun::fun:

wolfie69
13-12-2013, 13:46
Hi,

I suppose they are two groups of people that would fit into the Motorhoming way of life.

Must admit we do meet a lot of Teachers and Ex-military - but then like the previous posts I was in the Cheshire Regiment for six years and will always be Ex-Army no matter what.

Ex-Military people being very practical, resourcefull, easy going, Friendly (when not fighting the enemy).

Teachers just have a lot of time off, they have to do something!!!!!!

Cheers
Matthew

invalid
13-12-2013, 13:56
Hi,

I suppose they are two groups of people that would fit into the Motorhoming way of life.

Must admit we do meet a lot of Teachers and Ex-military - but then like the previous posts I was in the Cheshire Regiment for six years and will always be Ex-Army no matter what.

Ex-Military people being very practical, resourcefull, easy going, Friendly (when not fighting the enemy).

Teachers just have a lot of time off, they have to do something!!!!!!

Cheers
Matthew


Ex-RAF, I'd bet you get some bombs dropped on you after your last comment.

vespalien
13-12-2013, 14:18
We have met doctors, bin men, sailors & lots of retired people, but who cares? Why would you need to ask? Sometimes it comes out in conversations but I wouldn't automatically ask what people do (or did) for a living. I might ask where they have travelled from & what they plan to see so we can compare notes & swop ideas. But asking about jobs smacks of trying to pigeon hole people - it's the sort of question that I could give many different answers to & each answer might elicit a different response.

Final point; military "careers" can be very short, there are many people still active who were conscripted, others took short term "contracts", not many have spent a lifetime in the military, so defining a 70 year life span by a 5-10 years spell in the forces somehow demeans the rest of one's life. Many on here will spend longer that that as carers of their children and/or parents - a far more worthwhile way to define what you are & what you have done with your life in my personal view.

Sorry if I am upsetting the military types, but I prefer nurturing people to killing them.

shawbags
13-12-2013, 14:32
I bet there are a lot of ex truck drivers.

Siimplyloco
13-12-2013, 14:52
Sorry if I am upsetting the military types, but I prefer nurturing people to killing them.

Sorry, but I've not heard such a narrow minded piece in a long time. I always ask if the person I meet appears intelligent and interesting....

Pigeon holing? Asking what someone did before they retired can open up a real flower of conversation, especially from people who liked, or were particularly proud of something, that they did.

There was the grocer we met this year in Portugal who sold up to Tesco Extra and then bought himself his first motorhome - we introduced him to LIDL and he never looked back; the ex Chief Superintendent of Police in Toulouse who was full of wonderful stories told around the drinking table; the lovely ex restaurateurs in Montpellier - you know who you are - great entertainers both, I could go on. BTW, joining the military at 15 years old was a life changing experience for many, myself included, and certain did not demean my life, and your imputation is most impolite.

I'm happy to converse on a wide variety of subjects, work included, and BTW, I never killed or hurt anyone in my life....
John

chrisinbrighton
13-12-2013, 15:02
The battle begins:have fun::have fun::have fun:

rugbyken
13-12-2013, 15:11
The link between motorhomers and the military is probably that after a few exercises ( bridging gallops if your a Sapper) then going away in a fully equipped motorhome is luxurious living,
For teachers it's likely getting away from the little horrors, but seriously what other holiday experience allows you to visit & learn about so many places .

n brown
13-12-2013, 15:19
I always thought that having an unsettled life with lots of moving about,never long in one spot,may be a reason for liking the camper lifestyle,even to the extent of not liking the regimentation of campsites so preferring to wild camp. ex services guys I've met were certainly not fearful of pulling into a dark remote spot for the night.
I'm not ex military but had an unsettled upbringing and I just continue that.get a bit itchy footed quite quickly

Siimplyloco
13-12-2013, 16:08
I always thought that having an unsettled life with lots of moving about,never long in one spot,may be a reason for liking the camper lifestyle,even to the extent of not liking the regimentation of campsites so preferring to wild camp. ex services guys I've met were certainly not fearful of pulling into a dark remote spot for the night.
I'm not ex military but had an unsettled upbringing and I just continue that.get a bit itchy footed quite quickly

Spot on! By the way I equipped my machinery lorry with an electric kettle AND an electric blanket, and I slept inside out of the rain! So what's new about motorhoming? Mind you, I just fitted an electric point in the bathroom for SWMBO's rollers, and another in the cab for the electric blanket...
John

martyn
13-12-2013, 16:31
I'm both, now an ex teacher and ex military (tank regiment) and to me the van and wild camping is just like being back on exercise (in germany). We never, knowingly, killed anybody but we did a lot of foraging and camping in woodlands, drinking around camp fires and putting the world to rights. good times with good people.
martyn

Touringtheworld
13-12-2013, 17:17
I bet there are a lot of ex truck drivers.

The original Wild Campers :-)

maxi77
13-12-2013, 17:23
We have met doctors, bin men, sailors & lots of retired people, but who cares? Why would you need to ask? Sometimes it comes out in conversations but I wouldn't automatically ask what people do (or did) for a living. I might ask where they have travelled from & what they plan to see so we can compare notes & swop ideas. But asking about jobs smacks of trying to pigeon hole people - it's the sort of question that I could give many different answers to & each answer might elicit a different response.

Final point; military "careers" can be very short, there are many people still active who were conscripted, others took short term "contracts", not many have spent a lifetime in the military, so defining a 70 year life span by a 5-10 years spell in the forces somehow demeans the rest of one's life. Many on here will spend longer that that as carers of their children and/or parents - a far more worthwhile way to define what you are & what you have done with your life in my personal view.

Sorry if I am upsetting the military types, but I prefer nurturing people to killing them.

For reasons I cannot fathom some people like to pigeon hole themselves and every one else so they become working class, ex this and that , and so on. At the the end of the day we are all Jock Tamsons bairns and that's the end of it

wineciccio
13-12-2013, 18:46
Ex (secret service act), say no more!!!:idea-007:

Siimplyloco
13-12-2013, 18:47
At the the end of the day we are all Jock Tamsons bairns and that's the end of it

Here's an interesting take on Jock Tamson: it reinforces 'Pigeon Holing' somewhat!

From Wikipedia:

One explanation of this phrase (as recorded in the History of Duddingston Kirk) is that the Reverend John Thomson (Jock Tamson, Thamson), minister of Duddingston Kirk, Edinburgh, from 1805 to 1840, called the members of his congregation "ma bairns" (Standard English: my children) and this resulted in folk saying "we're a' Jock Tamson's bairns" which gave a sense of belonging to a select group

John

Tbear
13-12-2013, 19:39
We have met doctors, bin men, sailors & lots of retired people, but who cares? Why would you need to ask? Sometimes it comes out in conversations but I wouldn't automatically ask what people do (or did) for a living. I might ask where they have travelled from & what they plan to see so we can compare notes & swop ideas. But asking about jobs smacks of trying to pigeon hole people - it's the sort of question that I could give many different answers to & each answer might elicit a different response.

Final point; military "careers" can be very short, there are many people still active who were conscripted, others took short term "contracts", not many have spent a lifetime in the military, so defining a 70 year life span by a 5-10 years spell in the forces somehow demeans the rest of one's life. Many on here will spend longer that that as carers of their children and/or parents - a far more worthwhile way to define what you are & what you have done with your life in my personal view.

Sorry if I am upsetting the military types, but I prefer nurturing people to killing them.

So what's your opinion on military Paediatricians and Midwives as opposed to civilians that drive cars and kill no end of people on our roads.

The forces main role is to protect!

Richard

Siimplyloco
13-12-2013, 19:46
So what's your opinion on military Paediatricians and Midwives as opposed to civilians that drive cars and kill no end of people on our roads.

The forces main role is to protect!

Richard

Richard, the original post says all that we need to know.
John

Pauljenny
13-12-2013, 20:01
Ex 5th Pudsey Air Scouts and cookhouse corporal in the Army Cadet force . Married a Nursery Nurse ... Do I qualify to be in that 70 %.

Here in the Algarve , (Planet Wrinkly ) , when we meet new people ,there is always that slight awkward pause before we ask the question ....... "What do you do before you came down here ?"

I am very tempted to change the ending to ," before you died ?"

Is it just me ?

n brown
13-12-2013, 20:23
in my experience there seems to be more RAF than other services. they seem to be more flighty !

mandrake
13-12-2013, 20:40
cannot say one of my jobs .i would have to kill you if i did, but i have taken the keep things secret bit the home office make you say .taught many trainees how not to get killed darnt pit

vespalien
13-12-2013, 21:13
Anyone working for the GPO before it split will have signed the official secrets act (as will many minor Government officials), it was important that telephonists didn't share anything they heard on the boards.

I'm surprised at the reaction to one person's opinion, you all seem rather defensive. I'm also impressed that we are helping "democratise" Afghanistan using only midwives & paediatricians. But maybe this site is a branch of the British Legion & us mere civilians are not wanted.

exwindsurfer
13-12-2013, 21:35
not me

Siimplyloco
13-12-2013, 22:27
Anyone working for the GPO before it split will have signed the official secrets act (as will many minor Government officials), it was important that telephonists didn't share anything they heard on the boards.

I'm surprised at the reaction to one person's opinion, you all seem rather defensive. I'm also impressed that we are helping "democratise" Afghanistan using only midwives & paediatricians. But maybe this site is a branch of the British Legion & us mere civilians are not wanted.

There's nothing defensive about being proud to serve our Country, and also demonstrating the qualities that seem so badly lacking in a lot of our civilians....
John

whitevanwoman
14-12-2013, 01:36
Ex WRAC officer (attached to infantry), and have delivered education sessions in schools as a youth worker.

But I was also a pad brat, and over the years have worked as outdoor instructor, climbing wall instructor, minibus driver and assessor, resources manager, community transport scheme manager, sexual health outreach and education manager in a young persons clinic, community development assistant, research and evaluation project manager, university live-in warden, tourist information assistant, administrator, waitress, bar maid, bakery assistant, shop assistant, christmas post office worker, english tutor (in france), car boot seller, ebay seller, night shift forecourt cashier at Truckstop, craft worker, adult education tutor, and latterly camping bothy manager. So I'm not sure what pigeon hole I'd fit into, and to be honest, I don't give a monkeys - I am who I am, the product of my life experiences.

And when I bought my house 10 years ago it was my 33rd address in 34 years so I reckon I've done well to stay put for 10 years, but I've been struggling to control my itchy feet for a few years and if the housing market hadn't crashed, I doubt I'd still be here in the house. The van has helped to keep those itchy feet under control over the past couple of years but I sense I'm fighting a losing battle and the wilder side of life is beckoning and I'm ready for new adventures.

Undoubtedly army training taught me so many useful skills in terms of self-discipline, preparation, kit packing, living outdoors, putting up with physical hardship, planning, looking after kit, taking orders and leadership skills etc, skills which were built on as a mountaineer and climber, but other experiences, both as a paid employee, volunteer and simply as a person, have given me other useful skills and abilities all of which have shaped me.

The most important thing to me is to be open to new experiences, and to never stop learning - last week I learned how to set a snare, prepare a freshly killed pheasant without using a knife and make a spit roast wood frame to cook it on. Although it was delicious, I can't honestly say pulling the guts out is something I'd do for pleasure but it's a skill which may come in useful one day if ever I find myself stuck out somewhere in the wilds with no food. But not the usual kind of new learning experience for a middle aged woman (which could explain why some people think I'm a bit odd).

Far better to look back on a richly lived life and regret things you may have done, than to regret not having done things you wish you'd done.

Sharon the Cat
14-12-2013, 05:19
Many years ago I worked in the motor trade. One of our sites converted vans and another, up on the A1 somewhere, sold motorhomes on behalf of the owners. The man who owned the company (but didn't appear on any official paperwork) once told me "The sort of people who own motor homes are all nice, retired teachers, doctors etc.".

He thought they were so nice he sold their motorhomes, neglected to pass on the money & was put away for fraud.
I was a witness for the prosecution which was very embarassing as he had the same surname as me. :(

angelaa
14-12-2013, 06:17
Not us

Tbear
14-12-2013, 06:55
Anyone working for the GPO before it split will have signed the official secrets act (as will many minor Government officials), it was important that telephonists didn't share anything they heard on the boards.

I'm surprised at the reaction to one person's opinion, you all seem rather defensive. I'm also impressed that we are helping "democratise" Afghanistan using only midwives & paediatricians. But maybe this site is a branch of the British Legion & us mere civilians are not wanted.

I am not at all surprised that you choose to completely misunderstand my post and show total disrespect for all our forces personnel and the wonderful backup organisations such as the British Legion.

I doubt you are surprised be the reaction. In fact I am fairly sure it was worded just to get a reaction so I don't intend to waste any more time debating with someone who arguments appears to be based on lies and disrespect.

Richard

Siimplyloco
14-12-2013, 07:09
I am not at all surprised that you choose to completely misunderstand my post and show total disrespect for all our forces personnel and the wonderful backup organisations such as the British Legion.

I doubt you are surprised be the reaction. In fact I am fairly sure it was worded just to get a reaction so I don't intend to waste any more time debating with someone who arguments appears to be based on lies and disrespect.

Richard

Agreed. Trolling is trolling, no matter how subtle. No more posts from me either.
John

n brown
14-12-2013, 07:42
Many years ago I worked in the motor trade. One of our sites converted vans and another, up on the A1 somewhere, sold motorhomes on behalf of the owners. The man who owned the company (but didn't appear on any official paperwork) once told me "The sort of people who own motor homes are all nice, retired teachers, doctors etc.".

He thought they were so nice he sold their motorhomes, neglected to pass on the money & was put away for fraud.
I was a witness for the prosecution which was very embarassing as he had the same surname as me. :(

so what sentence did this Mr Galore receive ?

maureenandtom
14-12-2013, 08:34
Ex-RAF

Touringtheworld
14-12-2013, 08:46
Did not want to start world war 3.

It was a simple thing really - Paul and I reckoned that a certain amount of discipline was required to be a motor caravaner.
It was then he suggested that the majority must be teachers or military which led to my original post.
It was posted with no malice or hidden agenda.

My apologies.

Siimplyloco
14-12-2013, 08:58
Did not want to start world war 3.

It was a simple thing really - Paul and I reckoned that a certain amount of discipline was required to be a motor caravaner.
It was then he suggested that the majority must be teachers or military which led to my original post.
It was posted with no malice or hidden agenda.

My apologies.

Why apologise? Your thread was perfectly innocent, but there are others with an axe to grind and here was an opportunity to do just that!
John

theredman
14-12-2013, 09:23
.

Tbear
22-12-2013, 05:44
I'm not often poetic but this was just sent to me and as its Christmas




A 'Different' Christmas Poem

The embers glowed softly, and in their dim light,
I gazed round the room and I cherished the sight.
My wife was asleep, her head on my chest,
My daughter beside me, angelic in rest.
Outside the snow fell, a blanket of white,
Transforming the yard to a winter delight.

****
The sparkling lights in the tree I believe,
Completed the magic that was Christmas Eve.
My eyelids were heavy, my breathing was deep,
Secure and surrounded by love I would sleep.
In perfect contentment, or so it would seem,
So slumbered I, perhaps I started to dream

****
The sound wasn't loud, and it wasn't too near,
But I opened my eyes when it tickled my ear.

Perhaps just a cough, I didn't quite know,
Then the sure sound of footsteps outside in the snow.

My soul gave a tremble, I struggled to hear,
And I crept to the door just to see who was near.

Standing out in the cold and the dark of the night,
A lone figure stood, his face weary and tight

****

"It's my duty to stand at the front of the line,
That separates you from the darkest of times.

No one had to ask or beg or implore me,
I'm proud to stand here like my fathers before me.
My Gramps died in Europe on a day in December,"
Then he sighed,
"That's a Christmas 'Gram always remembers."
I've not seen my own son in more than a while,
But my wife sends me pictures, he's sure got her smile.

***
Then he bent and he carefully pulled from his bag,
The red and the white ... A Canadian flag.
I can live through the cold and the being alone,
Away from my family, my house and my home.
I can stand at my post through the rain and the sleet,
I can sleep in a foxhole with little to eat.
I can carry the weight of killing another,
Or lay down my life with my sister and brother.
Who stand at the front against any and all,
To ensure for all time that this flag will not fall."

***
"So go back inside," he said, "harbor no fright,
Your family is waiting and I'll be all right."
"But isn't there something I can do, at the least,
"Give you money," I asked, "or prepare you a feast?
It seems all too little for all that you've done,
For being away from your wife and your son."
Then his eye welled a tear that held no regret,
"Just tell us you love us, and never forget

***
To fight for our rights back at home while we're gone,
To stand your own watch, no matter how long.
For when we come home, either standing or dead,
To know you remember we fought and we bled.
Is payment enough, and with that we will trust,
That we mattered to you as you mattered to us."

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

"It is better to die on your feet than live on your knees"

-----------------------------------------------------------------------


Richard


CLICK HERE TO REMOVE THESE ADVERTS