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barge1914
20-10-2016, 14:12
Hi
Following on from our circuit of the west side of the country last December, we fancy a slow trip round the north coast of Scotland in Jan-Feb. I would be glad to hear from anyone who has done the route at that time of year. Immediate questions are: whether we'll find enough stopping places and spots to fill up and empty tanks and cassettes. What sort of temperatures one might expect on the coastal route (hopefully not as low as inland); whether road conditions are likely to be viable? For context...we have a Bessacarr E412, 3.5T, 5.8m, fwd, all season tyres, chains, insulated tanks and exposed pipe work, with heaters, solar panels. However despite these wintering measures I have some scepticism that they will be fully effective at very low temperatures, and despite 2 batteries that the tank heaters can be sustained for very long without topping up by mains charging at least now and again?? Comments most welcome.
Ian

jake
20-10-2016, 15:29
your brave !:camper:

The laird
20-10-2016, 15:50
Sorry never done it in the van but drive it in the 44 tonnes truck artic,wild!

caledonia
20-10-2016, 16:15
It's crap in winter! Freezin rain and snow, roads all blocked with snow, dark for 23 hours a day, everything is closed, you'll hate it!





Only kidding it's the best time of the year to enjoy its rugged beauty. Empty waste and fill up whenever you can and have plenty food and single malt. I normally head for an island during the festive season. Go for it and enjoy.

barge1914
25-10-2016, 20:37
Apart from the essential and frost resistant single malt, do you know if there are sufficient sources of unfrozen fresh water round that route in deep winter? Unfortunately it's not possible to derive from the website which taps and toilets are viable at this time of year, and from what I can see open campsites are pretty thin on the ground.
Ian

wakk44
25-10-2016, 22:02
I agree you are brave as the weather conditions can be appalling in the winter up there.If you are selective,watch the forecast and travel when it is decent I would imagine the landscape is quite stunning during winter.Don't expect too much output from the solar panels,I would like to have an alternative power source to recharge batteries every few days.

Obanboy666
25-10-2016, 22:06
Just go it, I spend more time up there in winter than any other time of the year. I don't have heated tanks, no snow chains and I have managed ok for the last 2 years.
I just make sure I have plenty of onboard water, full gas, plenty of food and always carry my genny in winter. Worst case scenario and i get stranded I will have plenty of provisions etc so will survive.

malagaoth
25-10-2016, 22:34
you should find enough places to fill up and empty - assuming that they arent either frozen solid or drained down for the winter but seriously why would you do it?

In the winter of 2013 a German couple got stranded in their motorhome for 5 weeks - they had to abandon their MH and walk 6 miles to the nearest village eventually the council sent a JCB to dig them out

It gets cold up there, seriously cold, and if you have built in gas tanks places to fill up are few and far between.
Wind might be another issue - I wintered (in a cottage) in the far north about 10 years ago I have never experienced wind like it 100mph+ with gusts well in excess.

Your solar panels will be of no use what so ever, the sun doesnt get high enough to even shine on them, the ultra short days will mean running your lights for far longer than you are used to and if you have blown heating then that will be running non stop too and cold batteries dont have the same charge as nice warm ones

Im heading up to Orkney soon and even though the plans are all finalised I have a nagging thought that I am totally mad and I will be back before the northern winter gets its teeth (hopefully - I thought that in October 2006 and got stranded in a very flooded Orkney with the ferries all cancelled and the A9 totally blocked with fallen trees and subsidence)

wakk44
25-10-2016, 22:39
Just go it, I spend more time up there in winter than any other time of the year. I don't have heated tanks, no snow chains and I have managed ok for the last 2 years.
I just make sure I have plenty of onboard water, full gas, plenty of food and always carry my genny in winter. Worst case scenario and i get stranded I will have plenty of provisions etc so will survive.

They breed 'em tough up north :D.

Sorry but my idea of a holiday break is not about whether we survive it or not.:rolleyes:

phillybarbour
26-10-2016, 06:19
This is a gennie situation. As long as you have a gennie most other things can be overcome even if you have to wait for a little bad weather to pass. As said keep gas and water topped up and go for it.

roamingman
26-10-2016, 08:20
They breed 'em tough up north :D.

Sorry but my idea of a holiday break is not about whether we survive it or not.:rolleyes:

People have been living up here for centuries and still do, it is quite satisfying with the fresh air and good food, people survive no matter where thay live. There are problems all over the world hot or cold wet or dry, when you get out in the motorhome it is a case of surviving or not road conditions climate to name just two.

caledonia
26-10-2016, 10:13
you should find enough places to fill up and empty - assuming that they arent either frozen solid or drained down for the winter but seriously why would you do it?

In the winter of 2013 a German couple got stranded in their motorhome for 5 weeks - they had to abandon their MH and walk 6 miles to the nearest village eventually the council sent a JCB to dig them out

It gets cold up there, seriously cold, and if you have built in gas tanks places to fill up are few and far between.
Wind might be another issue - I wintered (in a cottage) in the far north about 10 years ago I have never experienced wind like it 100mph+ with gusts well in excess.

Your solar panels will be of no use what so ever, the sun doesnt get high enough to even shine on them, the ultra short days will mean running your lights for far longer than you are used to and if you have blown heating then that will be running non stop too and cold batteries dont have the same charge as nice warm ones

Im heading up to Orkney soon and even though the plans are all finalised I have a nagging thought that I am totally mad and I will be back before the northern winter gets its teeth (hopefully - I thought that in October 2006 and got stranded in a very flooded Orkney with the ferries all cancelled and the A9 totally blocked with fallen trees and subsidence)

You've been watching to many movies. The company I work for run two 32 ton trucks collecting glass in the Highlands and Islands and even in the winter of 2011 had no real issues. Using common sense and keeping an eye on the forecast you will have a better time in the highlands over winter than you would in the summer. Go for it, you will love it.

malagaoth
26-10-2016, 10:31
You've been watching to many movies

I have lived in both Orkney and Caithness, yes the locals are a hardy lot but a 32 ton truck is hardly a motorhome (do the drivers sleep in the cab?) and even lorries get blown over.
You can do a lot if you need to, the question is if you dont need to do you really want to?



Sorry but my idea of a holiday break is not about whether we survive it or not


absolutely!

However on the plus side I can absolutely guarantee that you wont be troubled with midges

Deleted user 48797
26-10-2016, 10:42
While Scotland is very scenic this time of year I would rather travel the same distance South through France.
Bd..


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