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delicagirl
06-11-2016, 13:11
i hadn't been food shopping for a day or two and got so hungry at lunchtime that i knew i would buy rubbish if i went to the local coop - so i ate what was in the fridge:--


1 salmon fish cake
2 small pickled beetroots
1 slice black pudding
1 poached egg

Very tasty actually

Does anyone else do this ? Do you eat weird combinations of foods ? :tongue:

channa
06-11-2016, 13:40
A lot of the classics have similar origins of using what was left. Paella my favourite

Channa

yorkslass
06-11-2016, 14:16
If I'm hungry anything goes, but my default is weetabix or porridge.

harrow
06-11-2016, 14:35
Tonight brazing steak with onions and garlic.

dumplings.

Boiled potato carrots and broccoli.

We just have to make do :dance:

campervanannie
06-11-2016, 14:41
Winter staple after a long drive to anywhere tin of Heinz mulligatawny soup and a tin of Heinz spag bol mixed it's like a spicy noodle soup very warming with crusty bread.

rockape
06-11-2016, 15:36
I don't think that it makes any difference what you eat after a days long travel, it's always great. My wife asked me what I fancied out of the fridge, I had a choice between the light or ice cube's. She can make jack shxt out of jack shxt, and I still eat it, enjoying it is another matter.

delicagirl
06-11-2016, 15:44
Tonight brazing steak with onions and garlic.

dumplings.

Boiled potato carrots and broccoli.

We just have to make do :dance:


If thats "weird" food - what is "normal" food in your house then !!!!:idea:

trevskoda
06-11-2016, 15:48
As i have very poor taste and no smell anything goes esp the free stuff,it all ends up going the same place.

harrow
06-11-2016, 16:05
If thats "weird" food - what is "normal" food in your house then !!!!:idea:

Fish finger sandwiches and my wife, cold boiled potato for breakfast.

delicagirl
06-11-2016, 16:08
Fish finger sandwiches and my wife, cold boiled potato for breakfast.

I think i saw them in a supermarket somewhere this week !!!!!

boiled potatoes fried in bacon fat with an egg on top - yummy - but COLD :scared: ? that IS weird !!

trevskoda
06-11-2016, 16:21
Reminds me of 3 tramps walking down r/line finding a dead sheep two dived on it eating it, the third boy said yuck and walked on with the others,but sone they became sick and boked up ,the third boy dived on it with a spoon.
The others said you dirty git why did you not eat it fresh back there,to which he replyed i like my meals warm .

Asterix
06-11-2016, 16:36
Leftover pizza heated up and made into a sandwich with loads of butter on the bread.
Two minute noodles with a can of tuna thrown in,chicken or curry flavour works best...in fact I'm too knackered to cook tonight,been driving most of the day to land just out of Limoges,so noodles and tuna it is!

Ed on Toast
06-11-2016, 16:55
I really fancies a Beef in Ale casserole but as it is after 4 pm on a Sunday. I have to make do with what is in the freezer, so it is cubed Rib Eye in Ale casserole.

Its a hard life, all washed down with a couple of bottles of LOMZA, Polish beer.

Of course it is weird, it isn't in a pie crust and that is ny on a criminal offence in these parts.

delicagirl
06-11-2016, 16:59
I really fancies a Beef in Ale casserole but as it is after 4 pm on a Sunday. I have to make do with what is in the freezer, so it is cubed Rib Eye in Ale casserole.

Its a hard life, all washed down with a couple of bottles of LOMZA, Polish beer.

Of course it is weird, it isn't in a pie crust and that is ny on a criminal offence in these parts.

i knew a lancashire builder who used to eat pie butties - he was big as a bus

rockape
06-11-2016, 17:01
i knew a lancashire builder who used to eat pie butties - he was big as a bus I can,t see the problem with that.

Ed on Toast
06-11-2016, 17:08
Pie Barms are a culinary delight in these parts.

47994

and a Wigan Kebab (four pies on a stick) are exported as far as Leigh.

47993

At local weddings it is common to see the above served as starter and main at the wedding breakfast.

delicagirl
06-11-2016, 17:16
I can,t see the problem with that.

Eating pie butties ? or being as big as a bus ??? lol

campervanannie
06-11-2016, 17:17
Leftover pizza heated up and made into a sandwich with loads of butter on the bread.
Two minute noodles with a can of tuna thrown in,chicken or curry flavour works best...in fact I'm too knackered to cook tonight,been driving most of the day to land just out of Limoges,so noodles and tuna it is!

I love cold pizza for breakfast.

delicagirl
06-11-2016, 17:17
Pie Barms are a culinary delight in these parts.

47994

and a Wigan Kebab (four pies on a stick) are exported as far as Leigh.

47993

At local weddings it is common to see the above served as starter and main at the wedding breakfast.

AH PORK pies - that's different - i could eat those anyday !!!!!! (probably that was why i ended up big as a bus !!!!)

Tbear
06-11-2016, 17:25
Pie Barms are a culinary delight in these parts.

47994

and a Wigan Kebab (four pies on a stick) are exported as far as Leigh.

47993

At local weddings it is common to see the above served as starter and main at the wedding breakfast.

I have eaten rat, snake, chickens eyes, ducks feet and fish heads (not all at same time) but I have never even thought of four pies on a stick.:D

I chickened out of a deep fried Marsbar.

Richard

saxonborg
06-11-2016, 17:27
My dad used to have for his breakfast a couple of slices of black pudding smeared liberally with golden syrup. Sounds weird but it's ok.

delicagirl
06-11-2016, 17:29
I have eaten rat, snake, chickens eyes, ducks feet and fish heads (not all at same time) but I have never even thought of four pies on a stick.:D

I chickened out of a deep fried Marsbar.

Richard


local kids in my village bring mars bars into the chipshop and the owner deep fries them for them........ that IS WEIRD

yorkslass
06-11-2016, 17:39
My mum's favourite was crisp sandwiches, and when she was younger, condensed milk on bread.

delicagirl
06-11-2016, 17:46
My mum's favourite was crisp sandwiches, and when she was younger, condensed milk on bread.

i used to like crisp butties - mum used to enjoy sugar butties.......

delicagirl
06-11-2016, 17:48
I have eaten rat, snake, chickens eyes, ducks feet and fish heads (not all at same time) but I have never even thought of four pies on a stick.:D

I chickened out of a deep fried Marsbar.

Richard


pigs trotters are tasty but glutinous and not easy to eat in a civilised manner ......

Brains are gorgeous..... the texture of scambled eggs, sweet, and delicate, and packed with protein.... but since CJD (?) we are not allowed to sell/eat it any more

mid4did
06-11-2016, 18:02
tomorrow its going to be todays leftover roast chicken.Spuds and veg and greens mashed up fried in the frying pan,usually eat this with brown sauce and if there's not much add a fried egg.My mum came from liverpool and had a curious way of cooking to say the least but we never went hungry.
One of her leftover meals was rissoles which was similar to faggots but much tastier.

rockape
06-11-2016, 18:31
Eating pie butties ? or being as big as a bus ??? lolI meant eating the pie's, I don't throw stones. As big as a bus, there has to be a cut off point.

delicagirl
06-11-2016, 18:34
I meant eating the pie's, I don't throw stones. As big as a bus, there has to be a cut off point.



2 buses ?

rockape
06-11-2016, 18:36
AH PORK pies - that's different - i could eat those anyday !!!!!! (probably that was why i ended up big as a bus !!!!)And there was me imaging you as a slender little thing, don't spoil the illusion.

yorkieowl
06-11-2016, 18:38
We've had for tea, mushy peas with mince and onions mixed in as we had no pork pies left, was very tasty, quick to make, and just like pie and peas without the pastry. Cold korma and chupattis for brekkie, yum. :tongue:

delicagirl
06-11-2016, 18:41
And there was me imaging you as a slender little thing, don't spoil the illusion.

i WAS as big as a bus - i lost half my body weight 4 years ago... but still have to monitor my food intake/exercise on a daily basis.....


Collette Lord | Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=658406354312773&set=pb.100004302434247.-2207520000.1478461276.&type=3&size=2048%2C1536)


this was me in Scotland this summer

rockape
06-11-2016, 18:52
Still looking good, I can only admire your willpower.
I am still the same size and weight as I was yesterday.
Keep at it.

Auld Pharrrt
06-11-2016, 19:14
I have eaten rat, snake, chickens eyes, ducks feet and fish heads (not all at same time) but I have never even thought of four pies on a stick.:D

I chickened out of a deep fried Marsbar.

Richard

Ditto on the fish heads ... one of our staples when I was a kid was fish head soup ... I loved the eyeballs, when cooked they turn into a small white balls and are as tough as nails, taste kinda chalky, but I always fished (no pun intended) them out of the pot before anyone else could get to them, many, many years later, one of my sisters had boiled up some fish for the cats and I fished out the eyeballs, much to the horror of her kids ... from that day hence I was known on the CB as Fisheye.

My ultimate favourite food is fried brains, something that is impossible to buy these days, but if I get the odd roadkill sheep or deer I will still do it, simply fried with a shake of salt and pepper is the best way IMHO and they also make a superb sandwich spread.

I've eaten squirrel, but it was disgusting (or very badly cooked.) Goat is nice if the fat is trimmed off before cooking.

Auld Pharrrt
06-11-2016, 19:16
pigs trotters are tasty but glutinous and not easy to eat in a civilised manner ......

Brains are gorgeous..... the texture of scambled eggs, sweet, and delicate, and packed with protein.... but since CJD (?) we are not allowed to sell/eat it any more

Woohoo another brainy one! Ditto on the PT's. You're the first person (apart from my mother and I) that I've ever heard of eating brains. You don't happen to come from a Slavonic background do you?

delicagirl
06-11-2016, 19:20
Woohoo another brainy one! Ditto on the PT's. You're the first person (apart from my mother and I) that I've ever heard of eating brains. You don't happen to come from a Slavonic background do you?


I' am half English and half Irish and ate them in lancashire as a child - but i also ate them in Saudi Arabia in the 1970's - i taught the local arab sandwich bar entrepreneurs to say "muck buttie" (muck being the arabic work for brains).

Auld Pharrrt
06-11-2016, 19:23
I' am half English and half Irish and ate them in lancashire as a child - but i also ate them in Saudi Arabia in the 1970's - i taught the local arab sandwich bar entrepreneurs to say "muck buttie" (muck being the arabic work for brains).

I'm ¼ irish (father) ½ Scottish (father & mother) and ¼ Lithuanian (mother's parents) extremely adventurous when it comes to food but will never eat tripe again ... didn't mind the taste but hated the texture with a vengeance for some reason.

Escargot and frogs legs I have also eaten, I get them from a chinese supermarket in Dundee.

delicagirl
06-11-2016, 19:26
Ditto on the fish heads ... one of our staples when I was a kid was fish head soup ... I loved the eyeball, when cooked they turn into a small white ball and are as tough as nails, taste kinda chalky, but I always fished (no pun intended) them out of the pot before anyone else could get to them, many, many years later, one of my sisters had boiled up some fish for the cats and I fished out the eyeballs, much to the horror of her kids ... from that day hence I was known on the CB as Fisheye.

My ultimate favourite food is fried brains, something that is impossible to buy these days, but if I get the odd roadkill sheep or deer I will still do it, simply fried with a shake of salt and pepper is the best way IMHO and they also make a superb sandwich spread.

I've eaten squirrel, but it was disgusting (or very badly cooked.) Goat is nice if the fat is trimmed off before cooking.


Fish eyes - one of the most powerful pieces of writing i will always remember is an episode in Alexander Solzhenitsyn's "One day in the life of Ivan Denisovitch" . It is autobiographical, based on his incarceration in a prison camp in Siberia simply because he was a writer. On this one day he was given a bowl of fish "stew" - normally its just flavoured water with maybe a centimeter of onion occassionally. On this day it contains a fish eye. His repulsion at eating this, yet his knowledge that it contains a lot of protein, his desperation to feed his body, his fear of eating this monstrosity is written in such a vivid and graphic way, i wanted to throw up as i read it......

delicagirl
06-11-2016, 19:29
I'm ¼ irish (father) ½ Scottish (father & mother) and ¼ Lithuanian (mother's parents) extremely adventurous when it comes to food but will never eat tripe again ... didn't mind the taste but hated the texture with a vengeance for some reason.

Escargo and frogs legs I have also eaten, I get them from a chinese supermarket in Dundee.

My mum cooked tripe and i enjoyed it as a child. But had some recently and hated the texture, as you say.

In lancashire in the 1970's there were still a few shops left from the UCP franchise (United Cow Products). They were early "delis" and sold all sorts of cooked meats from various parts of the cow - tripe, elder, brains, and all sorts of other delicacies. The Manchester one had a cafe upstairs and sold wonderfully nutritious and cheap meals.

I have enjoyed frogs legs and escargot many a time and enjoy both.

Auld Pharrrt
06-11-2016, 19:40
Fish eyes - one of the most powerful pieces of writing i will always remember is an episode in Alexander Solzhenitsyn's "One day in the life of Ivan Denisovitch" . It is autobiographical, based on his incarceration in a prison camp in Siberia simply because he was a writer. On this one day he was given a bowl of fish "stew" - normally its just flavoured water with maybe a centimeter of onion occassionally. On this day it contains a fish eye. His repulsion at eating this, yet his knowledge that it contains a lot of protein, his desperation to feed his body, his fear of eating this monstrosity is written in such a vivid and graphic way, i wanted to throw up as i read it......

I don't know why he felt that way, I love 'em ... the "fish stew" sounds just like my mum's fish soup ... that's maybe where she got it from as her parents were "Lithuanian" but a fairly recent attempt to trace our family's history, one of my sisters was convinced that when our grandparents arrived in Britain during WW2 they had in fact escaped Russia via Lithuania with Lithuanian papers.

48008

delicagirl
06-11-2016, 19:44
i think his life in a prison camp in the wilds of Siberia in which many of the inmates died, and who had no specific sentence, so they had no hope. It must have been such an appalling way to live that we cannot ever imagine what their thought processes were.

have you found a way to research more of your family tree ?

Auld Pharrrt
06-11-2016, 19:54
i think his life in a prison camp in the wilds of Siberia in which many of the inmates died, and who had no specific sentence, so they had no hope. It must have been such an appalling way to live that we cannot ever imagine what their thought processes were.

have you found a way to research more of your family tree ?

Yeah, we really don't know everything people suffered in the name of war ... No, when my sister was doing it (she is the academical one) she hit a brick wall as Russia wouldn't give her any information, and in fact were very curious as to why she was asking etc. Probably would be more forthcoming now, but I don't have any interest in pursuing it and she is currently recovering from the big c.

mid4did
06-11-2016, 20:30
I like the way this thread is going.My mum also introduced us to udder,very cheap and could slice it like ham.
After she died we discovered her dads line were jewish from our great grandad who was of polish/russian descent.
An early 19th century census says russian born in poland.
On her mums side they hailed from amsterdam before that bayonne and valencia.
My dads side pure cornish.
Now where's me pasties.

delicagirl
06-11-2016, 20:33
I like the way this thread is going.My mum also introduced us to udder,very cheap and could slice it like ham.
After she died we discovered her dads line were jewish from our great grandad who was of polish/russian descent.
An early 19th century census says russian born in poland.
On her mums side they hailed from amsterdam before that bayonne and valencia.
My dads side pure cornish.
Now where's me pasties.


caviar filled of course !!

Auld Pharrrt
06-11-2016, 20:45
Nothing at all weird about it but for toasted sandwich fans, have you seen these?

Ridgemonkey Sandwich Toaster Standard and XL Available | eBay (http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/like/131708067848?lpid=122&chn=ps&adgroupid=33187828254&rlsatarget=pla-260581914842&adtype=pla&poi=&googleloc=9046853&device=m&campaignid=672517669&crdt=0&ul_ref=http%253A%252F%252Frover.ebay.com%252Frover %252F1%252F710-134428-41853-0%252F2%253Fmtid%253D1673%2526kwid%253D1%2526crlp% 253D146005917492_563391%2526itemid%253D13170806784 8%2526targetid%253D260581914842%2526device%253Dm%2 526mpre%253Dhttp%25253a%25252f%25252fwww.ebay.co.u k%25252fitm%25252flike%25252f131708067848%25253flp id%25253d122%252526chn%25253Dps%2526adtype%253Dpla %2526googleloc%253D9046853%2526poi%253D%2526campai gnid%253D672517669%2526adgroupid%253D33187828254%2 526rlsatarget%253Dpla-260581914842%2526gclid%253DCP7OwZKMldACFY0aGwodE-UIbA%2526srcrot%253D710-134428-41853-0%2526rvr_id%253D1120201928964)

I bought one of each and, although I have used my sandwich toaster at home many times to make a breakfast, I haven't used these for it yet ... However they heat ready made and home made sarnies and rolls really well, after a little practice, it's very easy to over do it if you aren't careful.

hextal
06-11-2016, 20:52
Did a blinder the other day as we were pretty much out of everything in the van and the nearest shop was about 30 miles away down a predominantly single track road.

Ginger and onion fried up then poured over a little white wine, cooked it off, then....... added a chicken & veg 'big soup', canned corn and peas and a pack of super noodles.....

Bizarrely nice tasting stew-type-thing.

Auld Pharrrt
06-11-2016, 20:53
I like the way this thread is going.My mum also introduced us to udder,very cheap and could slice it like ham.
After she died we discovered her dads line were jewish from our great grandad who was of polish/russian descent.
An early 19th century census says russian born in poland.
On her mums side they hailed from amsterdam before that bayonne and valencia.
My dads side pure cornish.
Now where's me pasties.

The mention of udder (though I've never tried it) triggered a memory of my mother coming home from the Glasgow meat markets with bags full of "thrapples" ... otherwise known as windpipes. She used to boil them for the dogs, very little nutrition in them but great for bulk and the dogs loved them, they were mostly gristle. She also used to pressure cook all our kitchen waste to which she would add oatmeal, minced thrapple then that was her chicken food supplement. The poor bloody birds loved it, and laid eggs constantly.

Auld Pharrrt
06-11-2016, 20:56
Did a blinder the other day as we were pretty much out of everything in the van and the nearest shop was about 30 miles away down a predominantly single track road.

Ginger and onion fried up then poured over a little white wine, cooked it off, then....... added a chicken & veg 'big soup', canned corn and peas and a pack of super noodles.....

Bizarrely nice tasting stew-type-thing.

Frankly, that sounds bloody tasty, maybe minus the ginger

Pauljenny
06-11-2016, 22:10
We were due to do the weekly shop last friday. It was raining and we couldn't be @rsed. Meant to go Saturday, but surprise visitors delayed us. Fridge emptying meal tonight.
A portion of cold mashed potato, ½ portion of Cooked pasta, a small head of calebrese brocolli, small red onion, Some manky cheddar that we bought before leaving UK, 6 weeks ago, a sweaty blue Rochfort cheese that we bought in France, 5 weeks ago . Portuguese fresh sausages, from the freezer. Two russet baking apples.
Jenny doesn't like reheated spuds, I do!
Found a good sized red,waxy potato, microwaved, while oven was heating, then into the oven to bake. Cored the apples, stuffed the cavities with apricots,prunes and cinnamon, coated with honey and wrapped in tinfoil...into the oven.
Chopped the onion & mixed it into the mashed spuds,with the juice from the blue cheese. Made it into a patty and popped into the oven sprinkled with extra virgin. Put the sausages in the top of the oven.
Microwaved the broccoli florets, made a cheese sauce with the manky cheddar, added the pasta and florets, From opening the fridge door to serving..... 35 minutes..

Pomegranates for breakfast... Again !!

Auld Pharrrt
07-11-2016, 00:52
We were due to do the weekly shop last friday. It was raining and we couldn't be @rsed. Meant to go Saturday, but surprise visitors delayed us. Fridge emptying meal tonight.
A portion of cold mashed potato, ½ portion of Cooked pasta, a small head of calebrese brocolli, small red onion, Some manky cheddar that we bought before leaving UK, 6 weeks ago, a sweaty blue Rochfort cheese that we bought in France, 5 weeks ago . Portuguese fresh sausages, from the freezer. Two russet baking apples.
Jenny doesn't like reheated spuds, I do!
Found a good sized red,waxy potato, microwaved, while oven was heating, then into the oven to bake. Cored the apples, stuffed the cavities with apricots,prunes and cinnamon, coated with honey and wrapped in tinfoil...into the oven.
Chopped the onion & mixed it into the mashed spuds,with the juice from the blue cheese. Made it into a patty and popped into the oven sprinkled with extra virgin. Put the sausages in the top of the oven.
Microwaved the broccoli florets, made a cheese sauce with the manky cheddar, added the pasta and florets, From opening the fridge door to serving..... 35 minutes..

Pomegranates for breakfast... Again !!

Similar tale of woe for me yesterday, empty cupboards etc. ... there are a fair amount of tins in my van downstairs sooo ... a quick phone call to my local kebab shop and ½ an hour later a nice big 12" munchy box was at my door :lol-053:

Deleted user 21925
07-11-2016, 06:23
Fried bread with strawberry jam on it.

Tastes like doughnuts. :tongue:

Tbear
07-11-2016, 06:33
Fried bread with strawberry jam on it.

Tastes like doughnuts. :tongue:

At first I nearly lost my breakfast but thinking about it? Where that frying pan? Oil or Beef Dripping? Erm!

Richard

Deleted user 21925
07-11-2016, 06:49
A lot of the classics have similar origins of using what was left. Paella my favourite

Channa

I would imagine that Kedgeree came about the same way Andy?

One of my favourite breakfasts.

Deleted user 21925
07-11-2016, 06:52
At first I nearly lost my breakfast but thinking about it? Where that frying pan? Oil or Beef Dripping? Erm!

Richard

Doughnuts are just fried dough with Jam and sugar Richard, so pretty much the same thing.

Beef dripping may be a stretch too far though! That belongs on bread or toast with lethal doses of salt.

campervanannie
07-11-2016, 07:01
Doughnuts are just fried dough with Jam and sugar Richard, so pretty much the same thing.

Beef dripping may be a stretch too far though! That belongs on bread or toast with lethal doses of salt.

Marmite not salt mmmmmmm.

Deleted user 21925
07-11-2016, 07:01
tomorrow its going to be todays leftover roast chicken.Spuds and veg and greens mashed up fried in the frying pan,usually eat this with brown sauce and if there's not much add a fried egg.My mum came from liverpool and had a curious way of cooking to say the least but we never went hungry.
One of her leftover meals was rissoles which was similar to faggots but much tastier.

When we were still living with our parents, mum would always do a huge Sunday roast. Me and my brothers always went to the pub on Sunday's though, usually not returning until late at night.

The whole roast dinner would then get mashed up, chucked in a frying pan with about half a pound of butter, cooked until just about burnt and smothered with copious amounts of brown sauce. A big bubble and squeak with meat really.

Move over Heston.

Deleted user 21925
07-11-2016, 07:04
Marmite not salt mmmmmmm.

When I dropped Terry's (Torchy) headlights off after Falkirk, he knew I liked Marmite and he presented me with a HUGE tub of it along with some beers.

I'm sorted for about a year!

jagmanx
07-11-2016, 07:12
Not weird but you can really enhance most cuppa soups by

Shredding a carrot (with a potato peeler then slicing up a bit more)
Likewise a potato.
Some finely chopped onion
Finely chopped Mushroom
Boil these in the stated amount of water for 5 to 10 mins.
Then add the cuppasoup ingredients (open the packet first !!!) maybe a bit more water salt pepper coriander

A delicious soup made from a rubbish base (ie the cuppasoup) ideal for lunch.

Many other veggies would be just as good
Cabbage Turnip and or Swede (are you in Scotland ?)
Left over bacon
Really whatever you can find in the fridge (ice cubes are not very tasty)

Deleted user 21925
07-11-2016, 07:20
Not weird but you can really enhance most cuppa soups by

Shredding a carrot (with a potato peeler then slicing up a bit more)
Likewise a potato.
Some finely chopped onion
Finely chopped Mushroom
Boil these in the stated amount of water for 5 to 10 mins.
Then add the cuppasoup ingredients (open the packet first !!!) maybe a bit more water salt pepper coriander

A delicious soup made from a rubbish base (ie the cuppasoup) ideal for lunch.

Many other veggies would be just as good
Cabbage Turnip and or Swede (are you in Scotland ?)
Left over bacon
Really whatever you can find in the fridge (ice cubes are not very tasty)

When I used to go Winter tent camping, I used to use Cuppa Soups added to Smash to go with my bacon in the morning. I wouldn't dream of eating Smash or Cuppa Soups at home, but when it's -5 outside it can be very comforting.

Tbear
07-11-2016, 07:40
Marmite not salt mmmmmmm.

I could not agree more Annie. Marmite and Beef Dripping is what used to fuel northern industry but sugar sandwiches where popular on the coal faces.

Richard

delicagirl
07-11-2016, 07:48
I like the way this thread is going.My mum also introduced us to udder,very cheap and could slice it like ham.
After she died we discovered her dads line were jewish from our great grandad who was of polish/russian descent.
An early 19th century census says russian born in poland.
On her mums side they hailed from amsterdam before that bayonne and valencia.
My dads side pure cornish.
Now where's me pasties.


i wonder if this is what we called "elder" as kids ? - it was a sliced meat-salad-sunday-tea meal in our house

gipsy_jo
07-11-2016, 07:50
I don't think that it makes any difference what you eat after a days long travel, it's always great. My wife asked me what I fancied out of the fridge, I had a choice between the light or ice cube's. She can make jack shxt out of jack shxt, and I still eat it, enjoying it is another matter.

Ha ha ha I know the feeling ;-)

yorkslass
07-11-2016, 07:55
I think my favourite is mucky fat, pork fat with the meat juices at the bottom then allowed to congeal before using, spread on doorstops of bread. Must be dusted with salt. I could eat that everyday. Dad swears by tripe. There used to be a shop at the local market, Channa will remember it, long since gone. Round here we can still buy it in Morrison's. Not my choice but dad swears it keeps him going.

channa
07-11-2016, 08:11
I would imagine that Kedgeree came about the same way Andy?

One of my favourite breakfasts.

it is a very old dish Rob and widely believed to have been brought back from soldiers serving in India, Although the version we cook is somewhat different to the Indian versions, I say versions because a simple biryani will vary dependent on the part of India, Two reasons mainly what local foods are available the size of the place and religious beliefs.

A lot of countries have a "left overs or whatever there is dish" Paella , Risottos Suri Gorengs Biryanis etc.

Vindaloo not a left over dish , is not Indian at all but Portuguese. originates in Goa with the Portuguese military. They shipped pork in vats of wine Vinegar "Vin" and added heads of garlic "aloo" not potato as commonly believed aloo being the Indian word for potato the red herring....mixed with a base gravy that the local Indians used vindaloo was born. Cooked properly it is not that hot despite its reputation more for the western palette.


Interesting reading some of the foods mentioned by others, my granddads were both colliers and one always had 2 raw eggs whisked in a glass of milk before his shift. cheap way of protein. people mentioning sugar sandwiches in the mines, sugar gives a quick energy burst all interesting stuff.

Channa

channa
07-11-2016, 08:16
I think my favourite is mucky fat, pork fat with the meat juices at the bottom then allowed to congeal before using, spread on doorstops of bread. Must be dusted with salt. I could eat that everyday. Dad swears by tripe. There used to be a shop at the local market, Channa will remember it, long since gone. Round here we can still buy it in Morrison's. Not my choice but dad swears it keeps him going. Are you referring to the Red Lion pub ? one of my tenancies. apparently at the front there was a tripe shop very popular in its day. Heckmondwike Morrisons have some old pictures in the store, one a carnival 1911 in the market place the stall can be clearly seen.

I originate from Doncaster and I can't recall dripping being called mucky fat. I love it myself as described, old landlords trick lots of salt the buggers drank more.
still a little market stall in Hecky market that sells it on a Saturday

Channa

mid4did
07-11-2016, 10:23
She also used to pressure cook all our kitchen waste to which she would add oatmeal, minced thrapple then that was her chicken food supplement. The poor bloody birds loved it, and laid eggs constantly.
Now i'm showing my age ! After the war when money was tight most people had chickens round the back.We always had a dozen cock birds as well as hens which were for laying.We'd beg from the cake shops and come home with sackfuls.The bread would go into the oven to crisp up and then into the mincer.
Our dad would keep all the veg leftovers including "tiddy skins" boil them up mix them with minced toasted bread.
Come christmas we'd have the biggest birds you'd ever seen .My job was plucking and drawing them.I would weigh them some as heavy as 10 lbs.

mid4did
07-11-2016, 10:28
i wonder if this is what we called "elder" as kids ? - it was a sliced meat-salad-sunday-tea meal in our house
It was cows udder I believe,white in colour.Not on my to do list though.:)

delicagirl
07-11-2016, 10:30
Now i'm showing my age ! After the war when money was tight most people had chickens round the back.We always had a dozen cock birds as well as hens which were for laying.We'd beg from the cake shops and come home with sackfuls.The bread would go into the oven to crisp up and then into the mincer.
Our dad would keep all the veg leftovers including "tiddy skins" boil them up mix them with minced toasted bread.
Come christmas we'd have the biggest birds you'd ever seen .My job was plucking and drawing them.I would weigh them some as heavy as 10 lbs.


10lbs - thats SOME chuck !!!

one summer i had a factory job in a chicken factory in greater manchester - it involved taking a chuck off the conveyor belt, shoving a plastic bag of giblets up its bum, putting the whole thing into a plastic bag, tieing the bag, and back onto a different conveyor belt - i could do 4 a minute at my peak !!!!

happy days - not !!!

caledonia
07-11-2016, 12:29
A miners piece was cheese and jam. My older brother worked at the butchers after school and used to bring home and cook some weird and wonderful things. He ended up a cook in the merchant navy so his experimenting on me paid off. It's normally cold shoulder and hot tongue for ma tea. :wacko:

yorkslass
07-11-2016, 12:31
I had forgotten about the shop in Hecky, Channa, I was thinking about the one at the corner of the market in Dewsbury, probably both owned by the same family.

Deleted user 21925
07-11-2016, 13:17
10lbs - thats SOME chuck !!!

one summer i had a factory job in a chicken factory in greater manchester - it involved taking a chuck off the conveyor belt, shoving a plastic bag of giblets up its bum, putting the whole thing into a plastic bag, tieing the bag, and back onto a different conveyor belt - i could do 4 a minute at my peak !!!!

happy days - not !!!

When my son was at school, he wanted part time work. He got a job which involved him washing the thick brown clay like soil off of potatoes, then dirtying them again with black peat so they looked like they had been grown in it.

They were then sent to your favourite supermarket.

channa
07-11-2016, 14:28
The weirdest thing I have ever eaten and had to prepare in a kitchen is probably Salade de Gesiers. Sounds exotic doesn't it ? I love the word gesiers.

Classic French and classic Dordogne, the confit de gesiers really tasty. What are they ? well in a nutshell ( no pun intended for walnuts are part of the salad)

Gesiers are ducks gizzards. A confit for anyone that doesn't know is a method of preserving food, typically duck is slow cooked and then stored in a earthenware jar in duck fat. Because oxygen can't get to it, it preserves the meat.

Upon cooking take the fat off with a kitchen towel and invariably saute in a little duck fat. Now here is the weird thing it is not greasy at all !! served on a bed of lettuce, walnuts are added and a vinigarette that varies.

Salade de perigord is very similar but often has breast of duck with it and topped off with a small toast and foie gras.

I think in the Dordogne they eat more duck than chicken and very little is wasted. The only thing not used is the quack !!

I have attached a recipe very close to what we used to do . Truth be known each establishment varies,

Bon appetite mes amis

Perigord Salad (Salade Périgourdine) (http://www.traditionalfrenchfood.com/perigord-salad.html)

Channa

channa
07-11-2016, 14:38
Chickens can await the same fate Rob !!:scared::lol-053:

Channa

Deleted user 21925
07-11-2016, 15:01
Chickens can await the same fate Rob !!:scared::lol-053:

Channa

That would be one sweet, sweet meal Andy!

trevskoda
27-12-2016, 19:59
Worlds best sarny is 50/50 brown white bread with jam on one side & peanut butter the other and sliced cheese in between,yum yum.
As for what you lot eat i knew there was something weired going on over there but i have the proof now.

alcam
28-12-2016, 07:33
As an old gaffer of mine used to say "if you cannae put it in a roll son it's no worth eating"

hotrats
29-12-2016, 20:49
When the water is right, welks and mussels and limpets from most sea lochs boiled in sea water and ate as you like,west Scotland lochs are abundant with wild camping eats.

GreggBear
11-01-2017, 18:18
i hadn't been food shopping for a day or two and got so hungry at lunchtime that i knew i would buy rubbish if i went to the local coop - so i ate what was in the fridge:--


1 salmon fish cake
2 small pickled beetroots
1 slice black pudding
1 poached egg

Very tasty actually

Does anyone else do this ? Do you eat weird combinations of foods ? :tongue:

Not weird, just sounds like a day in the life of big Gregg!:dance::tongue::wave::beer::wacko: Must be a Yorkshire thang!

GreggBear
11-01-2017, 18:22
I think i saw them in a supermarket somewhere this week !!!!!

boiled potatoes fried in bacon fat with an egg on top - yummy - but COLD :scared: ? that IS weird !!

Sounds like a winner hot or cold.... no wonder I'm 26st7:lol-049::scared::tongue:

GreggBear
11-01-2017, 18:27
i knew a lancashire builder who used to eat pie butties - he was big as a bus

Pie butties....Top nosh and used to be a staple round my neck of the woods!:tongue::tongue::tongue:

Deleted user 21925
11-01-2017, 18:30
When the water is right, welks and mussels and limpets from most sea lochs boiled in sea water and ate as you like,west Scotland lochs are abundant with wild camping eats.

We rented a log cabin once on an island on Loch Shuna.

There was a beach right outside the cabin where we could gather Mussels in the morning, and as you say, boil them for breakfast. :tongue:

Wully
11-01-2017, 18:51
Crispy roll tuna and beetroot.

Tunnochs coconut snow ball 30 sec micro hot custard. To dye for

Who started this I'm supposed to be on a diet.

Hondaboy
11-01-2017, 18:58
Crispy roll tuna and beetroot.

Tunnochs coconut snow ball 30 sec micro hot custard. To dye for

Who started this I'm supposed to be on a diet.

Trust you to mention snow balls, they don't know what they are down here, the shops have also stopped selling plain bread and scotch pie, I am now fading fast, now down to 13 and half stone.
Please feel free so send any of the above to me, emphasis on the free :help:

rugbyken
11-01-2017, 19:41
kids used to pull a face when i purposely cooked extra yorkshire pudding and ate it next day with jam no amount of telling them same batter used for pancakes would get them to try it, my favourite sandwich is the cold potato with cheese or potted beef and raw onion, also told the kids that at uni in the sixties the grant was paid per term and choice was often food or beer well no choice really so boiled rice flavoured with a tin of soup would make a good meal for three of us before going on the booze,

Deleted user 21925
11-01-2017, 20:04
kids used to pull a face when i purposely cooked extra yorkshire pudding and ate it next day with jam no amount of telling them same batter used for pancakes would get them to try it, my favourite sandwich is the cold potato with cheese or potted beef and raw onion, also told the kids that at uni in the sixties the grant was paid per term and choice was often food or beer well no choice really so boiled rice flavoured with a tin of soup would make a good meal for three of us before going on the booze,

We used to have Yorkshire pud with jam regularly Ken.

Also fried bread with jam on it is good.

yorkslass
11-01-2017, 21:08
A favourite of mine is a corned beef sarnie made with butter, topped with red hot chips and given a good squish together. Heaven, but not too often.

dane
12-01-2017, 08:28
My top food tip is:

when you run out of milk, make an instant hot chocolate and pour that on your cereal.

Obanboy666
12-01-2017, 12:35
Some brilliant ideas and I know it's not weird but my favourite when wanting a quick meal has to be fish finger sandwiches.
They have to be birdeyes and the bread has to be uncut whole meal with a thick covering of lurpak.
Might well have them tonight !

Deleted user 21925
12-01-2017, 12:38
Some brilliant ideas and I know it's not weird but my favourite when wanting a quick meal has to be fish finger sandwiches.
They have to be birdeyes and the bread has to be uncut whole meal with a thick covering of lurpak.
Might well have them tonight !

Definitely Birdseye, and one of the few foods I have ketchup on.

I'm usually a brown sauce kinda bloke.

Hondaboy
12-01-2017, 20:05
I like a scotch pie or a sausage roll in a roll or a sandwich.

Wully
12-01-2017, 22:58
Felt like a curry tonight but no joy the one who has to be obeyed said no

So tin of beans loads a pepper chopped up some jalapeños we bit a Texas barbecue sauce thick crusty bread and topped with grated chilly cheese I could sell this stuff. 👨*🍳 Put the bog roll in fridge just in case

campervanannie
13-01-2017, 05:08
Are you referring to the Red Lion pub ? one of my tenancies. apparently at the front there was a tripe shop very popular in its day. Heckmondwike Morrisons have some old pictures in the store, one a carnival 1911 in the market place the stall can be clearly seen.

I originate from Doncaster and I can't recall dripping being called mucky fat. I love it myself as described, old landlords trick lots of salt the buggers drank more.
still a little market stall in Hecky market that sells it on a Saturday

Channa
The fighting cock pub in Bradford still put Dread and dripping on the bar at lunchtime instead of peanuts marmite optional.

phillybarbour
13-01-2017, 06:31
Corned beef hash with baked beans over the top. This was on the menu in a cafe, tried it, loved it.

yorkslass
13-01-2017, 08:05
The fighting cock pub in Bradford still put Dread and dripping on the bar at lunchtime instead of peanuts marmite optional.

Another of my favourites. Bet they sprinkled it with salt!;)

channa
13-01-2017, 08:27
Another of my favourites. Bet they sprinkled it with salt!;) that's it get the punters thirsty !!!

Environmental Health take a dim view nowadays, risk of cross contamination people not washing hands after toilet visits etc. Certainly with nuts good chance serve a notice. You good give a packet away to each customer because pre packed and presented in a sterile environment.

Another great example of big brother deciding we are incapable of making our own informed decisions.

Channa


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