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Deleted user 21925
05-10-2018, 06:24
No, not those whistling creatures on the moon, but an old dish local to me.

A bit like a large sausage roll made with suet pastry, but with meat at one end and a dessert at the other. Yesterday I had the steak and ale and rhubarb and custard. It was delicious. Julie's packing me some up in the fridge for my weekend away and you can eat them hot or cold.

Traditionally they were eaten by farm workers who could carry them in their pockets and have dinner and pudding all in one go. What's not to like.

harrow
05-10-2018, 06:33
Bedfordshire clanger - Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bedfordshire_clanger)

The Bedfordshire clanger, also called the Hertfordshire clanger, Trowley Dumpling,[1] or simply the clanger, is a dish from Bedfordshire and adjacent counties in England, such as Buckinghamshire and Hertfordshire.[2] It dates back to at least the 19th century.

The word "clanger" is related to the dialect term "clung", which Joseph Wright glossed as meaning "heavy", in relation to food.[3][4]

The clanger is an elongated suet crust dumpling, sometimes described as a savoury type of roly-poly pudding.[5][6] It was traditionally boiled in a cloth like other suet puddings,[7] though some modern recipes use a shortcrust or other pastry and suggest baking it like a pasty, a method dating from a 1990s revival of the dish by a commercial bakery.[8] Its name may refer to its dense consistency: Wright's 19th century English Dialect Dictionary recorded the phrase "clung dumplings" from Bedfordshire, citing "clungy" and "clangy" as adjectives meaning heavy or close-textured.[4] The dumpling can be filled with liver and onion,[9] bacon and potatoes,[3] pork and onions,[10] or other meat and vegetables, and flavoured with the garden herb sage. While often savoury, the clanger was also said to have been prepared with a sweet filling, such as jam or fruit, in one end; this variant is referred to in a Bedfordshire Magazine of the 1960s as an "'alf an' 'alf" (half and half), with "clanger" reserved for a savoury version.[6] There is some doubt as to how much this was traditionally done in practice,[10] though modern recipes often imitate the folklore by including a sweet filling.

Historically, the clanger was made by women for their husbands to take to their agricultural work as a midday meal: it has been suggested that the crust was not originally intended for consumption but to protect the fillings from the soiled hands of the workers.[11] Clangers could be eaten cold, or warmed by being wrapped in damp newspaper under a brazier.[1] While sometimes associated with the hatmakers of the Luton district,[12] the same dish was also recorded in rural Buckinghamshire[3] and western Hertfordshire, where it was sometimes called the Trowley Dumpling after the hamlet where it was supposed to have originated.[1] It is still available at various bakers and served at some cafes, restaurants and local places of interest.

A similar dumpling was known in parts of Buckinghamshire, particularly Aylesbury Vale, as a "Bacon Badger".[3] It was made from bacon, potatoes and onions, flavoured with sage and enclosed in a suet pastry case, and was usually boiled in a cloth.[13][12] The etymology of "badger" is unknown, but might relate to a former term for a dealer in flour.[14] "Badger" was widely used in the Midland counties in the early 19th century to refer to a "cornfactor, mealman, or huckster".[15] The same basic suet dumpling recipe is known by a variety of other names elsewhere in the country; "flitting pudding" is recorded in County Durham, "dog in blanket" from Derbyshire,[16] and "bacon pudding" in Berkshire and Sussex.

A baked "clanger" featured as a signature bake in episode 8 of Series 8 of The Great British Bake Off.

harrow
05-10-2018, 06:36
The supermarkets could have a go at selling them, cooked meat at one end cooked fruit at the other end ?

Nesting Zombie
05-10-2018, 06:38
Yep, That certainly works for me Robmac,

(I’ve got A LOT of pockets !)

R0B
05-10-2018, 06:47
Wright's 19th century English Dialect Dictionary recorded the phrase "clung dumplings" from Bedfordshire

Hard to imagine why THAT name didn't catch on!
:-)

Sharon the Cat
05-10-2018, 08:22
I spent the majority of my life so far right on the Herts/Beds/Bucks borders & can't recall the name but the idea rings a bell.

Are you going to post Julie's recipe for us Rob?
:bow:
Pretty please, Phill would loooove something like this.

izwozral
05-10-2018, 08:26
New to me but I likes it.;)

Deleted user 21925
05-10-2018, 08:29
I spent the majority of my life so far right on the Herts/Beds/Bucks borders & can't recall the name but the idea rings a bell.

Are you going to post Julie's recipe for us Rob?
:bow:
Pretty please, Phill would loooove something like this.

I'm afraid Julie doesn't have a recipe Sharon, she just cooked up the ones she bought from the bakers in Sandy.

If you Google 'Bedfordshire Clanger' though, there are loads of recipes online.

Nabsim
05-10-2018, 08:29
Weren't the original Cornish pasties the same idea, savoury one end and sweet the other? Seem to remember coming across similar over the years but my memory can be a bit suspect at times :)

Deleted user 21925
05-10-2018, 08:30
Hard to imagine why THAT name didn't catch on!
:-)

:lol-061::lol-061::lol-061:

Makes me giggle every time I read that post!

Sharon the Cat
05-10-2018, 09:26
This article (https://www.countryfile.com/go-outdoors/regional-food-the-bedfordshire-clanger/) is interesting & gives a recipe with the correct suet pastry.

channa
05-10-2018, 10:17
Weren't the original Cornish pasties the same idea, savoury one end and sweet the other? Seem to remember coming across similar over the years but my memory can be a bit suspect at times :) also known as hoggies traditionally a tin miners meal the pastry had the same purpose

Regional foods are very interesting, my dad enjoyed Yorkies with apple and milk in Notts was known as a "drop pudding"

My favourite regional is the "Staffordshire Yeomanary pudding" delicious and I suspect very similar to the true Bakewell Pudding considering the proximity of the counties

Channa

Dowel
05-10-2018, 10:30
"Originally Posted by harrow"
Wright's 19th century English Dialect Dictionary recorded the phrase "clung dumplings" from Bedfordshire

Hard to imagine why THAT name didn't catch on!
:-)

Especially as in the WC typeface on my screen, cl and d look near identical:D

Pauljenny
05-10-2018, 16:45
I wonder if there's a connection to having dropped a clanger ?
You wouldn't want to let that happen, if it ruined your lunch and pudding.


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