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Thread: Lpg capacity.

  1. #11

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    Laika EcoVip 712


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    Had the same problem when we had a Bollero. The 6Kg bottles did not last long during the winter months. Managed to get one large refillable in and a small one as a reserve but I had to sit it on a box so it fitted right up at the top where the big bottle started to round off. Think Swift still think of them as Caravans and that people only ever go on sites which is also why they have that stupid one electric ring on the cooker.

  2. #12

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    lunar premier
    Alde heating is brilliant just uses lots of gas if you want a lot of heat.

    Most of the time we manage ok it's just that if it's really cold we want to be ok without worrying if we will run out.

    We've got 2 115 amp batteries and 320 watt of solar panels so we are ok for power .

    Like just said swift have a very small gas cupboard should have been like autotrail that take 2 x 11kg bottles

  3. #13

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    A kilogramme of gas gives about 13.7KWh of heat. So if you have a 2KW heater, it will use almost a kilo of gas every six hours. Estimate how long the heater will be on and you have a good estimate of gas use. My Truma runs at 2KW, 4KW or 6KW depending on heating need, but mostly runs at 2KW for a few hours each day
    A large three-way fridge will use around 300g of gas each day.
    Cooking uses a fair bit (maybe 1.8KW per hob burner) but tends to only be for a short while each day.
    Thanks R0B thanked for this post

  4. #14

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    Always think it's interesting that for the 'insulation/heating' ratings of motorhomes they are basically just testing the heaters. How quick you can get the van from a cold soak up to temp, and then how well it maintains the temperature with the heater on when in a cold chamber.

    Surely to test the insulation, they'd then shut off the heater and see how quickly the internal temperature dropped back down. I guess it's probably easier to just whack a bigger heater in.

    By the testing standards used you could probably stick a patio heater in a convertible and get a grade 3 rating.
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  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by hextal View Post
    Always think it's interesting that for the 'insulation/heating' ratings of motorhomes they are basically just testing the heaters. How quick you can get the van from a cold soak up to temp, and then how well it maintains the temperature with the heater on when in a cold chamber.

    Surely to test the insulation, they'd then shut off the heater and see how quickly the internal temperature dropped back down.
    No, definitely not. The only way to test this insulation is to measure how much heat input is needed to maintain a constant temperature differential with the outside. In a good test, that would be in a medium breeze, not in still air.

    However, it is also a valid test to measure how quickly the heating can bring the van up to temperature: that is a real-world scenario.

    Turning the heat off and seeing how fast the van cools is a test both of insulation and of thermal mass. That combination is not a useful measure. That's the stupid way they assess TOG ratings for duvets: a test designed by someone who doesn't understand thermodynamics. I'm not sure it's my strong point either: my thermodynamics tutor was the dullest lecturer I have ever suffered!

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by hairydog View Post
    No, definitely not. The only way to test this insulation is to measure how much heat input is needed to maintain a constant temperature differential with the outside. In a good test, that would be in a medium breeze, not in still air.

    However, it is also a valid test to measure how quickly the heating can bring the van up to temperature: that is a real-world scenario.

    Turning the heat off and seeing how fast the van cools is a test both of insulation and of thermal mass. That combination is not a useful measure. That's the stupid way they assess TOG ratings for duvets: a test designed by someone who doesn't understand thermodynamics. I'm not sure it's my strong point either: my thermodynamics tutor was the dullest lecturer I have ever suffered!
    Have to disagree there (no offence meant). Also studied thermodynamics at university, and whilst there's a lot of elements to take account of, I think for something like a motorhome you can go with relatively simple theory.

    You can maintain a constant differential with almost no insulation and a large enough heat source/driver. The insulation comes into effect in trying to achieve that economically, with less heat input, so less lpg.

    Edit:- as with my brexit post, I'm very drunk but love everybody. So if anyone is upset have a kiss froM me.
    Last edited by hextal; 10-11-2018 at 00:11.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by hextal View Post
    Have to disagree there (no offence meant). Also studied thermodynamics at university, and whilst there's a lot of elements to take account of, I think for something like a motorhome you can go with relatively simple theory.

    You can maintain a constant differential with almost no insulation and a large enough heat source/driver. The insulation comes into effect in trying to achieve that economically, with less heat input, so less lpg.

    Edit:- as with my brexit post, I'm very drunk but love everybody. So if anyone is upset have a kiss froM me.
    Try reading what I wrote with your brain sober, then feel free to apologise. I said the test should measure how much heat input is needed to maintain a constant temperature differential. That is a test of the insulation. There is no other sensible way to test the insulation.

  8. #18

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    For the meet at Moffat in my 7M van with Truma blown air heating on most of the time I used 16.07litres of gas. Filled up on way there on Thursday pm and refilled at same pump on Sunday noon(ish).
    Its not the gas usage thats the problem with blown air systems its the 12v pump.
    My problem is getting my head round filling up in litres and discussing tank capacities in kilos.

  9. #19

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    1KG=2L more or less
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