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Thread: Seems like a modern "cutting edge" idea.

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    Seems like a modern "cutting edge" idea.



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    When I started school in the 1940s all the classrooms had the times tables along one side wall.

    We sat facing Miss Green, lately of the Waffen SS, and read the tables.

    It was a matter of competitive pride to try and beat your mates, or any girl, to be the first to learn them and be able to recite them by rote.

    By the time we were about seven or eight we were proficient, we knew our tables and had a good grounding for later maths.

    It was the same for reading. Twice a term reading exams which included reading aloud to the class.

    Today we have 16 year olds leaving school with reading difficulties and needing a calculator for simple arithmetic.

    So the government have introduced this to try and improve standards and some teachers, unsurprisingly, are objecting to it :-

    Times-tables test trial to start at 290 primary schools

    Not bad 70 years later to get back to where we started.

    Dezi

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dezi View Post
    When I started school in the 1940s all the classrooms had the times tables along one side wall.

    We sat facing Miss Green, lately of the Waffen SS, and read the tables.

    It was a matter of competitive pride to try and beat your mates, or any girl, to be the first to learn them and be able to recite them by rote.

    By the time we were about seven or eight we were proficient, we knew our tables and had a good grounding for later maths.

    It was the same for reading. Twice a term reading exams which included reading aloud to the class.

    Today we have 16 year olds leaving school with reading difficulties and needing a calculator for simple arithmetic.

    So the government have introduced this to try and improve standards and some teachers, unsurprisingly, are objecting to it :-

    Times-tables test trial to start at 290 primary schools

    Not bad 70 years later to get back to where we started.

    Dezi
    I agree this method of teaching basics worked pretty well . Have to remember even back then it didn't work for all . Wouldn't claim to know percentages but there were a few in every class who didn't master their tables , spelling etc
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    Yes

    It is the Wheel or Pendulum way that things come and go..

    I could be optimistic and say things spiral up instead but ????

    Next they will Be Nationalising the Railways

    Only to Privatise again in another 40 or 50 years (not that it will worry me !)

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    I've just read the article, and I can see why some teachers would object. When we did times tables it was something that happened every week, sometimes daily. Now it looks like they're going to make a production of it, more form filling for teachers. The best idea would be for all governments to butt out and let teachers do what they're supposed to do, teach. I've noticed that learning to read seems to be taught pretty much how we were taught, by sounding letters out. Once you get the hang of that, you can take a fair shot at any word for the rest of your life.

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    Our boy is in primary, and they've been doing tables for ages. When they think they are ready they can ask to be tested, and will get a badge if successful which they wear with pride.

    I don't really know where this story is coming from as I don't think his school is unusual...
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    Sorry, but this is twaddle. Today, schools teach times tables. And they have always done, without a break, since the war.
    There were some stupid schools that taught pupils to count up rather than recite "four, eight, twelve..." instead of the more useful "one four is four, two fours are eight..." but tables have always been part of maths teaching.
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    when I went to school I was obsessed with math's, I was top of my year in test's that they carried out, second to the top of the school, when anybody called at our house to see my parent's I used to mather them to do me math tests, now its all calculators, which they are allowed to take into math's exams, when my son was doing maths I couldn't help him, Ididn't have the know how because maths have changed so much over the years, but he was taught the times table, it was fun learning

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    Quote Originally Posted by hairydog View Post
    Sorry, but this is twaddle. Today, schools teach times tables. And they have always done, without a break, since the war.
    There were some stupid schools that taught pupils to count up rather than recite "four, eight, twelve..." instead of the more useful "one four is four, two fours are eight..." but tables have always been part of maths teaching.
    Well if you are going to sit on the fence then we are not going to get very far !!!

    Seriously I think it might be the luck of the draw where you live. I have lived most of my life in the South.

    My children born 1967 & 1970 had varied results. Some schools were still using the above method some had moved on - or back depending on how you look at it.

    Grand children born 1990 96 & twins 99 did not have the above method just tables for a short while three days a week.

    Until the family relocated to Inverness and the excellent Scottish education ethos kicked it.

    Tables every morning & a gold star for Table pupil of the month.

    I am delighted to say it has paid of handsomely.

    Dezi

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    Our lass teaches GCSE maths to kids (well, young adults) that failed it first time around. Most have no idea what a times table is.

    I also get the feeling that some of the managers may be a little out of practice on maths too. Take kids that failed catastrophically the first time, then try to get them to pass by giving them one sixth of the lesson time that they had 1st time around.

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    Kids here are tops in GB when it comes to school,except me ,anyway my daughter has blowen the lid on reading as top marks are 96/98,abby landed a 123 .
    As for maths doing well at that two as the last teacher she had was from southern ireland and tought the old way,thank heavens.
    Any way im making sure she will learn and im making her read science books to so not to end up like big dumbo me.
    Only dirty people wash
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