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Thread: Meet my new lady Molly !

  1. #1

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    Meet my new lady Molly !



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    My madness as finally taken over, as much as I love the bike and pigeon catcher that she is ,cold days etc and snow mean it makes sense for a little car also a season ticket for dialysis every other day may mean I have to find my own way somedays

    So hunting about I have come across Molly a 1962 Morris Minor 1000 runs as a daily runner and very close to parting with some cash. The benefits I see as follows

    1) She is MOT and Tax exempt
    2) has hardened valves for Lead free, and a an alternator rather than dynamo for electrickery
    3) a heater which was an option in 1962
    4) reasonably economical 30 -40 mpg
    5) on vehicles of this age good chance she will appreciate in value rather than drop like a brick
    6) best insurance so far 340 fully comp with 100 excess

    Disadvantages

    1)
    she needs a little welding on one inner wing and passenger footwell. I cant weld so either learn very fast or pay but told bread and butter work
    2) she will be kept outside and needs flatting and a coat of lacquer

    30 She is an old car, and so invariably will need constant fettling

    4) All my tools are bloody metric so be working in fractions like 5/8 ths so that's a big learning curve

    For speed thrills got Maureen the bike but I love the mechanical simplicity of the Minors, I don't own a watch anymore so providing we get form A to B who cares how long it takes she has recently been fully serviced and trunions etc greased and brakes overhauled

    Parts are readily available and reasonably priced against newer stuff

    If I were still in the trade would sell her as an honest car there is go gilding lilys she is what she is

    I found her last week and cant get her out of my head , the seller has a Rover P6 to restore hence she is in the way but seems a decent bloke and been honest and disclosing the work with receipts what needs doing and receipts as evidence

    She oozes something called character am I totally mad ? basic mechanicals I can cope with although must be 30 years since playing about with points still gives me summat to do

    Molly.jpg

    Channa

  2. #2
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    The laird is offline Full Member
    Name: Gordon
    Spouse: Fonky fi

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    Looks good mate

  3. #3

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    Nope not mad at all....

    Simple reliable mechanics and all bits readily available (including repair panels)

    Yes they rust (but so did everything else back then) I'd always steer clear of the traveller version due to complexities of the rear timber work being structural (though complete replacement kits are available at reasonable cost)
    The a series lump is as reliable as... Bits are 10 a penny (lots shared with minis and stuff up to the allegro)
    And tuning is infinitely possible.... Twin cars, long centre branch manifolds and stage tuned heads.
    Likes GreggBear liked this post

  4. #4

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    an engine compartment you can climb into and stroll around, things you can hit with a hammer to make them better, an engine you can change in under 2 hours ,a design that makes people smile ,what's not to like?
    too blessed to be stressed

  5. #5

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    There is a lot to be said for going back to basics with motoring. And if you change your mind, chances are you will still come out on top selling on, so worth taking the punt.
    Camperbus Blog and Website - www.wildebus.com
    Electrical Bits - stores.ebay.co.uk/Camper-Van-Kit

  6. #6
    The laird's Avatar
    The laird is offline Full Member
    Name: Gordon
    Spouse: Fonky fi

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    Hymer b544 and luv it
    Changing the brake master cylinder or the brake pipe that goes into it or stubs /trunnions mmmmmm let me think noo

  7. #7

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    Yes, we have one
    And you used to be able to start without a key, dead easy!
    I even had a very early one 1952 split screen
    Minor Series II[edit]
    Morris Minor Series II
    Morris-Minor--Series--II--w.jpg
    Morris Minor Series II four-door saloon
    Overview
    Production 195256
    269,838 produced
    Assembly
    Oxford, England
    Birmingham, England
    Victoria Park, Australia[15]
    Body and chassis
    Body style
    2-door saloon
    4-door saloon
    2-door convertible
    2-door estate
    Powertrain
    Engine 803 cc A-series I4
    In 1952, the Minor was substantially re-engineered following the merger of the Nuffield Organisation (Morris's parent company) with the Austin Motor Company to form the British Motor Corporation. As part of a rationalisation programme to reduce the production of duplicate components for similar vehicles, the Minor drivetrain was completely replaced with an Austin-derived engine, gearbox, propshaft, differential and axle casing. The more modern Austin-designed 803 cc (49.0 cu in) overhead valve A-series engine, which had been designed for the Minor's main rival, the Austin A30, was smaller in all dimensions, but nevertheless gave noticeable performance improvements over the pre-war side-valve 918 cc (56.0 cu in) Morris unit it replaced. The 52 second drive to 60 mph (97 km/h) was still calm, but top speed increased to 63 mph (101 km/h). Fuel consumption also rose to 36 miles per imperial gallon (7.8 L/100 km; 30 mpg‑US).

    An estate version was introduced in 1952, known as the Traveller (a Morris naming tradition for estates, also seen on the Mini). The Traveller featured an external structural ash (wood) frame for the rear bodywork, with two side-hinged rear doors. The frame was varnished rather than painted and a highly visible feature of the body style. Travellers were built alongside the saloon model at Cowley minus their rear bodies. The half-completed cars were then shipped to the MG factory at Abingdon where the bodies (built in Coventry) would be mated to the chassis and the final assembly carried out. This was because the main Cowley production lines were no longer fully equipped to deal with body-on-frame vehicles such as the Traveller while the MG lines still handled these sorts of cars and had experience working with wood-framed bodies. Commercial models, marketed as the Morris Quarter Ton Van and Pick-up were added in May 1953.[19] Rear bodies of the van versions were all steel. The four-seat convertible and saloon variants continued as well.

    The Motor magazine tested a four-door saloon in 1952. It reported a top speed of 62 mph (100 km/h) and acceleration from 050 mph (80 km/h) in 28.6 seconds. A fuel consumption of 39.3 miles per imperial gallon (7.19 L/100 km; 32.7 mpg‑US) was recorded. The test car cost 631 including taxes.[20]

    From 195256, a 803 cc a A-Series inline-four engine was used, producing 30 hp (22 kW) at 4,800 rpm and 40 ft⋅lb (54 N⋅m) of torque at 2,400 rpm

    A horizontal slat grille was fitted from October 1954,[21] as well as a new dashboard with a central speedometer.

    269,838 examples of the Series II had been built when production ended in 1956.[21]
    Tramping the Dream, Enjoying the Pot of Sunshine at the Rainbow end!

  8. #8

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    see picture
    The king pins on these fail unpredictably, so it might be worth premptively replacing them. Not a huge job, and better than the front suspension collapsing as you enter a busy roundabout!
    Also keep the area above the brake master cylinder cover clean: otherwise grit from your feet will get into the works.
    The insurance quote sounds high to me. Specialist classic car insurers can often be cheap.

  9. #9

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    Our retired Doctor has a few cars, he has a new Jaguar XF, a V8 Morgan but he can be seen most days in his Morris 1000 driving along with a smile, I had a few classic cars and loved my Vanden Plas Princess but regrettably had to sell them when we moved here, go for it

  10. #10

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    I ran a Triumph Spitfire as a daily transport for 15 years after I restored it. It was fun but I would never again go back to running a classic as a main car. I got fed up of constantly having niggles and jobs to do which is not fun in the winter. The car was garaged but I still suffered damp and fogging windows that I struggled to clear with the original rubbish heater and blower. Reproduction parts are often dire and often do not last as long as they should (eg a set of radiator hoses cracked after a year). Rust is a constant battle. The rebuilt gearbox I got from a respected specialist locked sold at speed and nearly caused my wife to have a bad accident. OK, they replaced the box it but I still had to strip it out and take it back to them.

    Keith

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