CLICK HERE TO REMOVE THESE ADVERTS


Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 57

Thread: a cure for cancer......

  1. #11

    Member Number
    46529
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    5,668
    Motorhome
    Mitsubishi delica JB500


    CLICK HERE TO REMOVE THESE ADVERTS
    Quote Originally Posted by REC View Post
    GcMAF: a story of exploitation and lies | Anticancerfund
    "Cancer cured for good?" Gc-MAF and the miracle cure - Cancer Research UK - Science blog

    The "research" done to prove this drug was retracted and shown to be very poor. The patients ( less than 20 total) had already had or were having conventional treatment so the benefits were hard or impossible to point to GcMaf plus the researchers did not actually monitor the tumours being treated! I think the cancer research article is particularly relevant.
    There are many drugs coming now, which are properly researched and activate the immune system. I don't think this is one of them at the moment.

    i have read some of the research quoted here thanks. it gives a very different picture

  2. #12

    Member Number
    26242
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    1,178
    Location
    Suffolk & central Portugal
    Motorhome
    Converted Citroen relay mwb
    Quote Originally Posted by harrow View Post
    Just to add a recollection from 35 years ago, when I first had chemo.

    There was another chap my age,

    but his job did not have any sick pay,

    he had his chemo and in between treatment sessions he used to go back to work,

    and he was a industrial welder !
    When I started, we used to mix the 5fu at the end of the patients bed.....they used to come in for three days of continuous infusions and stayed in the ward. Now an ambulatory pump is attached to an indwelling line and they go home till the pump needs removing. The same drug is also given in tablet form now for some patients.
    I had a patient who used to run to the hospital for his weekly Chemo, then run home after. When he finished he did the London marathon a month afterwards. Some treatment is always better tolerated, and some people have more side effects than others. These are better managed than years ago but some do have a harder time than others.
    Likes harrow, delicagirl, RoadTrek Boy liked this post
    Thanks harrow, Debroos thanked for this post

  3. #13
    mariesnowgoose's Avatar
    mariesnowgoose is offline Official OTW
    Name: Marie
    Spouse: She's gone bald!

    Member Number
    22098
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    12,032
    Motorhome
    Laika Ecovip 400i
    I'm seeing the chemo nurses for a pre-chemo talk session at 3:30 this afternoon.

    I have also looked at the alternative ideas, they do sound good and when you're facing scary radiation treatments you desperately want there to be something else that would work just as well. Not that chemo or radiotherapy works that well, at best it maybe delays the inevitable for a few years.

    You've got cancer. There is no permanent cure, it can always come back again in the future, sometimes quickly, sometimes it can take a long time.

    Busy reading a book called The History of Cancer. It has calmed me down and my layman's view is to just bite the bullet and get on with it.
    I am still highly sceptical about the treatment methods - I bet a million quid folk will look back in 20 years or so and be saying did we really use such a horrible, body destroying treatment for cancer?! Unfortunately it is not 20 years down the line and when you're diagnosed with cancer you haven't got a lot of time to decide what route you want to take.

    I don't want to die just yet if I can help it. But it seems too scary, plus I'm not brave enough, to go down the 'alternative therapy' route, so the only option you can look to is chemotherapy and radiation, both very nasty, but there it is. Chemo can also cause cancer as well as kill cancer cells, so you are stuck between a rock and a hard place.

    I'm scared sh**l*ss. My treatment starts next week, 18 weeks of bodily punishment, then 3 weeks or radiotherapy followed by monthly intravenous drugs for a year at least.

    Neither does it help the situation when you are mucked about by a broken and inefficient mainstream system into the bargain. Where I live there are massive staff and support service shortages. I've found myself to be no more than a piece of meat on a rather flimsy, battered and unreliable production line in a sausage factory.

    It's a case of gritting your teeth, being vigilant (I have my scary big sister keeping an eye on proceedings now, thank god!) and trusting that you will get through the process and have some reasonable quality of life remaining when you come out the other end of the nuclear war.
    Life: unfinished threads in a never-ending tapestry
    There but for the grace of God go I
    Thanks harrow, delicagirl thanked for this post

  4. #14

    Member Number
    22267
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    4,856
    Quote Originally Posted by mariesnowgoose View Post
    I'm seeing the chemo nurses for a pre-chemo talk session at 3:30 this afternoon.

    I have also looked at the alternative ideas, they do sound good and when you're facing scary radiation treatments you desperately want there to be something else that would work just as well. Not that chemo or radiotherapy works that well, at best it maybe delays the inevitable for a few years.

    You've got cancer. There is no permanent cure, it can always come back again in the future, sometimes quickly, sometimes it can take a long time.

    Busy reading a book called The History of Cancer. It has calmed me down and my layman's view is to just bite the bullet and get on with it.
    I am still highly sceptical about the treatment methods - I bet a million quid folk will look back in 20 years or so and be saying did we really use such a horrible, body destroying treatment for cancer?! Unfortunately it is not 20 years down the line and when you're diagnosed with cancer you haven't got a lot of time to decide what route you want to take.

    I don't want to die just yet if I can help it. But it seems too scary, plus I'm not brave enough, to go down the 'alternative therapy' route, so the only option you can look to is chemotherapy and radiation, both very nasty, but there it is. Chemo can also cause cancer as well as kill cancer cells, so you are stuck between a rock and a hard place.

    I'm scared sh**l*ss. My treatment starts next week, 18 weeks of bodily punishment, then 3 weeks or radiotherapy followed by monthly intravenous drugs for a year at least.

    Neither does it help the situation when you are mucked about by a broken and inefficient mainstream system into the bargain. Where I live there are massive staff and support service shortages. I've found myself to be no more than a piece of meat on a rather flimsy, battered and unreliable production line in a sausage factory.

    It's a case of gritting your teeth, being vigilant (I have my scary big sister keeping an eye on proceedings now, thank god!) and trusting that you will get through the process and have some reasonable quality of life remaining when you come out the other end of the nuclear war.
    Now listen, I though that you was a tough old girl ?

    Without you..... those nurses will be on facebook and eating chocolate biscuits, get yourself down that hospital and get yourself fixed up !
    Thanks mariesnowgoose thanked for this post

  5. #15

    Member Number
    6231
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    11,088
    Motorhome
    CI Euro Riviera 100
    Quote Originally Posted by mariesnowgoose View Post
    I'm seeing the chemo nurses for a pre-chemo talk session at 3:30 this afternoon.

    I have also looked at the alternative ideas, they do sound good and when you're facing scary radiation treatments you desperately want there to be something else that would work just as well. Not that chemo or radiotherapy works that well, at best it maybe delays the inevitable for a few years.

    You've got cancer. There is no permanent cure, it can always come back again in the future, sometimes quickly, sometimes it can take a long time.

    Busy reading a book called The History of Cancer. It has calmed me down and my layman's view is to just bite the bullet and get on with it.
    I am still highly sceptical about the treatment methods - I bet a million quid folk will look back in 20 years or so and be saying did we really use such a horrible, body destroying treatment for cancer?! Unfortunately it is not 20 years down the line and when you're diagnosed with cancer you haven't got a lot of time to decide what route you want to take.

    I don't want to die just yet if I can help it. But it seems too scary, plus I'm not brave enough, to go down the 'alternative therapy' route, so the only option you can look to is chemotherapy and radiation, both very nasty, but there it is. Chemo can also cause cancer as well as kill cancer cells, so you are stuck between a rock and a hard place.

    I'm scared sh**l*ss. My treatment starts next week, 18 weeks of bodily punishment, then 3 weeks or radiotherapy followed by monthly intravenous drugs for a year at least.

    Neither does it help the situation when you are mucked about by a broken and inefficient mainstream system into the bargain. Where I live there are massive staff and support service shortages. I've found myself to be no more than a piece of meat on a rather flimsy, battered and unreliable production line in a sausage factory.

    It's a case of gritting your teeth, being vigilant (I have my scary big sister keeping an eye on proceedings now, thank god!) and trusting that you will get through the process and have some reasonable quality of life remaining when you come out the other end of the nuclear war.
    it is a common misconception treatment can cure the same applies to my ailment , A transplant is seen as a more viable alternative to Dialysis. THat said the screening for transplant is ultra rigorous because the Med professions attitude is there is always dialyisis

    I highlight this to reinforce exactly what you are saying, advances in medicine may occur but doesnt really help as things stand.

    People talk as if it is like popping a paracetomol it isnt , we buried a fellow patient yeasterday.

    Marie you just have to engage the best you can , understand as much as you can one thing the consultants will do is offer better more extensive explainations, Look on the positive side and be grateful for the small vicotries as they occur.

    When i say engage I spoke with a transplant co ordinator yesterday need to know as you go along basis as per the norm but the hidden cloak and dagger questions i knew what she was trying to establish through sdoing my own research and the tone of the convo changed when she realised I was listening and she wasnt talking to a muppet

    Be direct, if you dont understand something ask again until you do ,Alternative therapies are a great idea but sadly most are not trialled in a clinical fashion so figures can be corrupted

    a Harrow says dont be shy ,trey and think positive...I cant prove it but state of our minds does play a big part in our welfare

    Channa
    Thanks mariesnowgoose thanked for this post

  6. #16

    Member Number
    22267
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    4,856
    Quote Originally Posted by mariesnowgoose View Post
    I'm seeing the chemo nurses for a pre-chemo talk session at 3:30 this afternoon.

    I have also looked at the alternative ideas, they do sound good and when you're facing scary radiation treatments you desperately want there to be something else that would work just as well. Not that chemo or radiotherapy works that well, at best it maybe delays the inevitable for a few years.

    You've got cancer. There is no permanent cure, it can always come back again in the future, sometimes quickly, sometimes it can take a long time.

    Busy reading a book called The History of Cancer. It has calmed me down and my layman's view is to just bite the bullet and get on with it.
    I am still highly sceptical about the treatment methods - I bet a million quid folk will look back in 20 years or so and be saying did we really use such a horrible, body destroying treatment for cancer?! Unfortunately it is not 20 years down the line and when you're diagnosed with cancer you haven't got a lot of time to decide what route you want to take.

    I don't want to die just yet if I can help it. But it seems too scary, plus I'm not brave enough, to go down the 'alternative therapy' route, so the only option you can look to is chemotherapy and radiation, both very nasty, but there it is. Chemo can also cause cancer as well as kill cancer cells, so you are stuck between a rock and a hard place.

    I'm scared sh**l*ss. My treatment starts next week, 18 weeks of bodily punishment, then 3 weeks or radiotherapy followed by monthly intravenous drugs for a year at least.

    Neither does it help the situation when you are mucked about by a broken and inefficient mainstream system into the bargain. Where I live there are massive staff and support service shortages. I've found myself to be no more than a piece of meat on a rather flimsy, battered and unreliable production line in a sausage factory.

    It's a case of gritting your teeth, being vigilant (I have my scary big sister keeping an eye on proceedings now, thank god!) and trusting that you will get through the process and have some reasonable quality of life remaining when you come out the other end of the nuclear war.
    PS, if you have given up, can I have your Harley Davidson ?

    Can't help being naughty
    Last edited by harrow; 23-05-2019 at 13:18. Reason: being naughty
    Likes mariesnowgoose, delicagirl, Alf liked this post

  7. #17

    Member Number
    16509
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    17,317
    Location
    bristol
    Motorhome
    sprinter banger
    funny enough [ hilariously !] , i've just come from the oncology dept myself. had a nice cheerful chat to the consultant about how the chemo was a waste of time and time for radiozapping ,i think it's called. no promises of course, none expected mate, i always thought that something would get me . time now to get some skunk juice ,or whatever is around, and give that a go
    personally i don't think reading about cancer is good for you- they can't guarantee a cure ,so it's pointless . better to do what you can and live like it won't get you, constant thinking about it has to be bad for your brainbox ! so pack it in and get on with the positivity , even if you have to force it a bit !
    too blessed to be stressed

  8. #18

    Member Number
    32936
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    1,999
    Motorhome
    vw t5
    Agree about the skunk juice Mr Broon. Not a miracle cure by any means but has transformed my life mentally and physically after a diagnosis of MS. Thanks to cbd oil I can now get back on with my life and stop taking the chemicals prescribed by my GP.

  9. #19

    Member Number
    55769
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    60
    Motorhome
    Frankia i650
    Hi
    I was a scientist researching the effects of lifestyle (diet, exercise, etc) on cancer (prevention mainly) for over 20 years and in that time I have read (and also published) a lot of papers on the benefits (or not) of various "natural" products on cancer. In my view there is very scarce convincing evidence for anything due to the lack of rigorous clinical trials since who would fund them as there's no patentable product to make money from. However, some of the evidence for turmeric, vitamin d and cruciferous vegetables (broccoli, sprouts, etc) is persuasive and worthy of doing some reading. Incidently I take turmeric in the form of golden paste (google for recipe) and recommend it to anyone who'll listen.
    Thanks harrow, mariesnowgoose, yorkslass thanked for this post

  10. #20

    Member Number
    55264
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    189
    Motorhome
    High roof doblo
    Quote Originally Posted by bellars View Post
    Hi
    I was a scientist researching the effects of lifestyle (diet, exercise, etc) on cancer (prevention mainly) for over 20 years and in that time I have read (and also published) a lot of papers on the benefits (or not) of various "natural" products on cancer. In my view there is very scarce convincing evidence for anything due to the lack of rigorous clinical trials since who would fund them as there's no patentable product to make money from. However, some of the evidence for turmeric, vitamin d and cruciferous vegetables (broccoli, sprouts, etc) is persuasive and worthy of doing some reading. Incidently I take turmeric in the form of golden paste (google for recipe) and recommend it to anyone who'll listen.
    Have you read the China study? That was an enormous data collection with relevance to cancer prevention and possibly cure.

Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •